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Full text of "Genealogy of the Child, Childs and Childe families, of the past and present in the United States and the Canadas, from 1630 to 1881"

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IILD.CHILDSANDUHILDE 



j FAMILIES, 

Of the Past and Present in the United States and the C 

from 1630 to 1881. 



ELIAS CHILD. 




published for the Author by 
OURTISS & CHILDS, PRINTERS, 167 GENESEE ST., U'TICA N. V 



1881. 






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DEDICATION. 



TO THE DESCENDANTS NOW ON THE STAGE, AND THOSE COMING AFTER, 

OF A WORTHY ANCESTRY TRACED IN THE SEVERAL LINES 

BEARING THE NAME OF CHILD, CHILDS AND CHILDE. 

THIS WORK IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED; 

WITH THE EARNEST WISH AND CONFIDENT HOPE THAT THE RESULTS 

OF A PATIENT AND PERPLEXING SERVICE OF MORE THAN THREE 

YEARS, MAY MEET THE CORDIAL APPROVAL OF THOSE 

FOR WHOSE PLEASURE AND BENEFIT THE WORK 

HAS BEEN UNDERTAKEN. 



!: Honour thy father and thy mother, that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord 
* h y God giveth thee." — Exodus xx. 13. 







THE CHILD COAT CF ARMS. 



PREFACE. 



We would earnestly request all to read the Introduction (so 
termed) to this work, as opening the plan pursued in its arrange- 
ment. Selecting the _ Emigrant, the date of whose arrival in 
America in most definitely ascertained, as the pioneer in our 
Genealogy, we have traced his descendants as far as attainable 
to the present time. The next line is kindred to that first gi ven, 
the emigration, also, supposed to be about the same time ; and 
thus with each line the same order is observed in reference to 
arrangement.' These differing lines are followed by some in- 
complete families now in the United States who have not as yet 
been able to find the clues to their early ancestry in America ; 
and two ancestors and their descendants who have come to 
this country within the present century; the whole supple- 
mented by some names not linked to any line, and some sta- 
tistics pertaining to lines previously recorded, which came to 
hand too late to be placed in their due position. Such matter 
is so marked as to be easily placed whereat belongs. There is 
another point we wish may early attract -attention, namely, the 
articles on the " Origin and EtymoHf y of the surname Child," 
and "Sketches and Incidents of English Families." That 
we may escape the charge of any purpose to force the use 
of a form in the name, which some discard, we wish it to 
be distinctly understood that our aim has been to write 
the name in all cases as desired by its bearer. Any failure 
has been unintentional. It has been exceedingly difficult to 
discriminate, when in the same family a part write the name 
with, and a part without the "s". Further on we think it is 
clearly shown that the name was originally written without the 
We are aware that some feel indifferent, and others regret 



".9. 



VI. PREFACE. 

the use of the " s" as a terminal in their own case, and have re- 
quested that it be left off in the printing of their record. Others 
still are quite tenacious to have the "s ".attached. We cannot 
but express the belief that when the article on the origin of the 
name, furnished by one who has devoted much time in its prep- 
aration, is carefully read, there will be a common feeling of 
regret that the " s " should ever have been added. Its use or 
omission will not vitally affect the identity of any one in this 
work. No very serious embarrassment will arise in tracing the 
lines. Our method of recording the different branches by gen - 
i erations in due chronological order, will generally render it easy 
for one to trace his or her line of ascent. In this place it is 
pertinent to emphasize the advantages of a well prepared Gen- 
ealogy — one of which is that it preserves the identity of families 
and individuals, even with such changes in the spelling of the 
name, in any manner to please -the fancy. The importance 
of preserving this identity is apparent in questions of legal titles 
to an estate, a point perhaps to which many have not given 
serious thought. A no less important consideration is that 
Genealogical records show how far we are indebted to our an- 
cestors for our physical, mental and moral proclivities — an in- 
heritance we cannot escape if we would. It is folly there- 
fore to attempt to ignore our ancestry, as we are held by a law 
higher than ourselves. It is the dictate of wisdom to recognize 
the existence of relations which affect our destinies, and cherish 
what are beneficent, while we guard against those that are bane- 
ful in their tendencies. Much of the moral evil and physical 
suffering of this life might be avoided or remedied by giving 
heed to the laws of transmission. The medical man in the 
treatment of physical diseases has gained a point often when 
he has learned the antecedents of his patient. This law applies 
to mental and moral tendencies with equal force. Instead of 
alliances and associations fruitful of baneful results, more 
healthful ones could be inaugurated, bearing sweeter fruits, 
were not fundamental laws set aside. 



Table of Contents. 



introduction, - • - - - 9-22 

Origin and Etymology of the Surname Child, 23-30 

Sketches and Incidents of English Families, - 31-58 

Article ox Coat of Arms. ... - .V.t-64 

American Families. 

Ephraim Child, Earliest Emigrant, Wafertown, Mass . «*>.",— 6T 

Koxb.ry Branch. 

Benjamin Child, and Descendants. Roxbury, Mass.. - 69-493 

Woodstock Families. 

Ephraim Child. Woodstock, Ct., 74-79 

(apt. Increase Child, Saratoga Co., X. V.. - 79-81 

Judge Salmon Child, Saratoga Co., X. V.. 81-85 

Increase W. Child. M. !>.. Saratoga Co., X. Y.. 85-86 

William Child. Walworth Co., Wis., - 90-91 

Rev. Increase Child. Frewsburgh, X'. Y., - 93 

Alfred B. Child St. Lawrence Co.. X. Y., 94-95 

Warren G. Child. Ogden City, Utah, - - 102-104 

Walter Hewitt, Ypsilanti, Mich . - - 110 

Wooster Family, - - - 110-112 

Ephraim Child. M. D., Saratoga Co., N. Y., - 117 

Orville W. Childs, Syracuse, X. Y.. - - 119-122 

Noadiah M. Childs. Syracuse, N. Y., - - 124-125 

Daniel B. Childs, Esq., 195 Broadway, X. Y. City, - - 125-120 

Bosworth Family, ..... 129-134 

William Child, Editor, in Michigan, . - - - 134-135 

Asa Child, Editor, in New York City, - - 135-137 

Rev. Win. Chauncey Child, D. D., Boston, - - - 137-138 

Renssalaei Child, Woodstock, Ct. - - - 139-140 

Hon. Asa Child, Norwich, Ct., - - - 140-141 
Hon. Calvin G. Child, Stamford, Ct , 140-141 and 792-794 

Hon. Linus Child. Boston. Mass., 143-144 

Daniel Child. Bethel, Yt., - - - 148-149 
A. L. Child, M. D., (thrilling experience of ) Plattsmouth, Neb. 151-155 
Stephen Child. Woodstock, Ct., and the Burleigh Family, 



William Chandler, Woodstock, Ct., 
Henry Child, Woodstock, Ct„ 
Capt." Willard Child. Wood-tuck. Yt.. 
Morse Family, Exeter. X. Y., 
Henry Child, Fairlee, Yt., 
Dea. Luther Child, Woodstock. Ct., 
Dca. Asa T. Child, Woodstock, Ct,, 
Clinton Child, Woodstock, Ct,, 



1(1!) 

173-175 

3-179 and 791 

1 ; H-185 

185 

187 

188 

188 



Vlll. 



CONTENTS. 



Rev. Willard Child, D. D., Pittsford, Vt. 

Erastus May, Woodstock, Ct., 

Sylvia C. Walker, Woodstock, Ct. , 

Cynthia Child May. Woodstock. Ct., 

Lyon, May, and Phillips Families. Woodstock, Ct., 

Exeter. N. Y., - 
Capt. Elisha Child, Woodstock. Ct., 
Dea. Charles Child, Woodstock, Ct., 
Witter Family. Woodstock, Ct., 
John Child, Woodstock Ct , 
Charles Child, Woodstock, Ct,, 
John H. Child. Woodstock. Ct.. 
Abiel Child, Wallingford, Vt., 
C. Harris Child, New York City. 
Capt. Flias Child, Woodstock, Ct., 
Elisha Child, Exeter, N. Y ., 
Parker M. Child, Exeter, N. Y., 
Henry H. Curtiss, Utica, N. Y., 
Lucius C. Childs, Utica, N. Y., 
Elias Child, (compiler of this work) Utica, N. Y., 
Charles Childs, Otsego, N. Y., 
Dea. Elisha Child, Woodstock, Ct., 
Wm. G. Child, Woodstock. N.Y., - 
Horatio H. Child, Leonardsville, N. Y., 
Charles T. Child, Exeter, N. Y., - 
Luther Child, Fowlersville, Livingston Co., N. Y., 
Erastus Child, Oneida, Knox Co., 111., 
Aaron P. Child, Creston, Iowa 
Erastus Child. Woodstock, Ct.. 
Peter Child, Woodstock, Ct., 
Col. Chester Child, Woodstock, Ct, 
Capt. Benjamin Child, Woodstock, Ct., 
Cephas Child, West Fairlee, Vt,, - 
Chamberlain Family, Bradford, Vt.. 
Luce Family, Vermont, and Half Day, Lake Co. 111., 
Nathaniel Child, Woodstock, Ct , 

Dea. William Child and Samuel his son, Woodstock, I 
Alpha Child, Woodstock, Ct., 
Darius Child, Fairlee, Vt,, 
Judge William Child, Fairlee. Vt., 
Griffin Child, Providence, R. I., 
Rev. Wm. S. Child, D. D., Newport, R. I., 
Rev. Jedediah Morse, D. D., Charlestown, Mass., 
Prof. Samuel F. B. Morse, LL. D., New York City. 
Sidney E. Morse, New York City, 
Rev. Aspenwall Hodge, D. D.. Hartford, Ct., 
Walker Family, 
Roxbury Family. 

Edward Child, Roxbury, Mas., 

Stephen Child, Roxbury. Mass., - - - 







Pages. 




- 


190 


-192 


- 






195 




- 




195 


- 






196 


and 










. 


198-207 


- 




207 


-209 




- 




210 


- 






212 




- 




215 


- 






216 


- 


- 




217 


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-223 


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and 


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-795 


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240 

241 




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-782 




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t., 


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and 


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253 
254 


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256 




- 


256- 


-257 


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-260 




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-262 


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263 




265 


and 


789 






266- 


-279 




_ 




280 


- 




283- 


-285 



CONTENTS. ix. 

I* A ' ■ 

Stephen Childs, New Bartford, N. V.. - 288 

Grace Child and Timothy Walker, Rehoboth, Mass., 293 

Mary Child and Peter Walker, Rehoboth, Mass., 295 

Woodstock Families. 

Ebenezer Child, Castleton. Vt., - 309 312 

Horace S. Child, Geneseo, Henry Co. [11., - 313 

Orange Child, New York City, - - 315 

Alonzo Child, New York City and St. Louis, Mo., 319-321 

Pearley Child, New York City, - - 323 

Col. Jonathan Child, Thetford, Vt.. - - 325 

William Child, Thetford, Vt., - - 325-326 

Cyril Child and Judge Edward P. Child, Lincoln. Neb., 326 and 785 

Major Jonathan Child, Rochester, N.Y., - - 326-328 

Rev. Eber Child, Fulton, Wis., - - - ' - 332 

Capt. Penuel Child, Connecticut, - - 33- r -336 

Horace Child. Ashtabula Co. , - - 339-340 

Jesse Child, Howell, Mich., .... 345 

A midon Family, Genesee Co. N. Y., -• 346-348 

Timothy Child, Sullivan Co. N. Y., - - 850 

Lord Family, Now Jersey and New York City, 351-355 

Richard Dwight Child, Grahamville, X. Y., 355 

Obadiah Child, Neversink, N. Y., - - - 356-357 

Bradley Child. White Haven, Pa., - - - 359 

Judge John G. Child, Napanock, N. Y., - 364-365 

Capt. John Child, Bath, X. H., - 366-367 

Hon. John Hibbard, Bath, N. H., - - 3G8 

Hon. Dwight P. Child, Bath, N. H., - - 371 

Hon. Wm. G. Child, M. D. Bath, N. II., - - 372 

Hon. Bradley G. Child, Bath, N. H. - - 374 

Sanborn Family, Jay, Vt.. - - 375-378 

West Family, Derby, Vt., - - - 378-382 

Hutchins and Goodall Families, Bath, N. H. 382-383 

Dea. Dudley Child, Bath, N. H., - - - - 383-384 

David Child, Nevada, Story Co. Iowa, - 384-385 

Richard Child, Nevada, Story Co. Iowa, • 388 

Jonathan Child. Grinnell, Iowa, - 391 

Dudley child, Bath, N. H., - - 390 

Dea. Thomas Child, Woodstock, Ct„ 394-395 

Justus Childs, Utica. N. Y., - - - 396-397 

J. Morris Childs, Utica, N. Y.. 397 

Orlando J. Childs. Utica, N. Y., - - 397 

Rev. Thomas P. Child, Troy, Ohio. - 398 

Roxbury Family. 

Joshua Child, Roxbury, Mass., - 400 

William Child, Baltimore. Md., 4C2-403 

Capt. Amasa Child, Sturbridge. Mass.. 404 

Miss Anna Child, San Fracisco, Cal., 406 

Addison Child, Boston, Mass., 406 

Richards ( hild, Boston . .Mass., 408- 109 

Isaac Child, Boston Highlands, Mass., - - -411-413 



CONTENTS. 



Daniel P. Child, Boston, Mass., 

Edward V. Childe, Paris, France, 

May Pamily, Roxbury, Mass. and Woodstock, Ct., 

Johnson Family, - 

Woodstock Families. 

John Child, Woodstock, Ct., 

Abijah Child, Pomf ret, Vt.. 

Jacob Child, Franklin Co , N". Y., - 

William S. Child. M. D. Chateaugay, N. Y. - 

Justin Child, Malone, N. Y. 

Elias Child, West. Woodstock, Ct. 

Horatio N. Child, West Woodstock, Ct. - 

Russell Child, West Woodstock. Ct., - 

Gnrdon H. Child, West Hartford, Ct., 

Nathaniel Child, Thomson. Ct., 

Hon. Marcus Child, Thompson, Ct., 

Elijah Child, Sharon, Vt.. 

Alexander Child, Granville, Vt., 

Charles H Child, Ash Grove, 111., 

Abner Child, Vermont. - 

Baxter Pamily, Grand Rapids, Mich., - 

Roswell Child, Moretown, Vt., 

Charles Childs, La Payette, Ohio., 

Charles F, Child and Chapin Family, Grinned, Iowa., 

Keith Family., ------ 

Marcus Child, Dixville, Stanstead, Co. P. Q. 

Elias W. Childs, Janesville, Wis., 

Seth Child, M. D. East Hartford, Ct., 

Stephen Child, Saganaw, Mich., 

Jacob Child, West Woodstock, Ct., 

Waldo Child, Norwich, Chenango Co. N. Y. - 

Benjamin Child, West Woodstock, Ct., 

Asa Child, Lenox, N. Y., 

Chester Child, Ludlowvillc, N. Y. - 
Watkrtown Family. 

William Child and Descendants., 

John Child, Watertown, Mass., 

Jonathan Child, Grafton, Mass., 

Josiah Child, Fpton, Mass., 

Col. Asa Childs, Upton, Mass , 
, Harvey Childs, Pittsburgh, Pa., 

Col. James H. Childs, Pittsburgh Pa., - ■ 

Maj. George A. Childs, Pittsburgh, Pa., 

Solomon Child, Henniker, N. H. , - 

Dea. Aaron Child, Henniker, N. H , - 

Rev. Ward Child, Onondaga Hill, N. Y., - 

William H. Childs, Niagara Falls, 

Heaton Family. - 

Hon. Aaron Childs, Ypsilanti, Mich., 

Ira Goodell Childs, Ypsilanti, Mich., 



Pages. 
413 

418 

418-421 

422-423 

426-427 

428 

429 

431 

432-433 

434 

436 

437 

438 

440 

442 

444 

447 

448 

460 

460-404 

467 

469-470 

470-471 

475-478 

480-481 

481 

483 

482 

485 

484 

485-486 

486-487 

491-492 

494-594 

506-507 

508 

508-5.9 

512-514 

515-517 

517-519 

522-524 

524 

525 

526 

529 

531-535 

539 

542 



CONTENTS. XI. 

Pages. 

Dea. Josiah Cbilds, Augusta, Mich., - - 542-548 

Moses Child and Janus Child his son, Maine, 545 548 

James Loring Child, Hallowell, Me., - - - 548-549 

David Lee and Mrs Lydia .Maria Child, Boston, Mass., - 556 

('apt. John Childe, Springfield, Mass., - 558 

Eagar and Twitch ell Families, Vermont, - - 560-576 

Alexander Child, Barre, Orleans Co. N. Y., 576 

Sidney S. Childs, Menasha, Wis., - - 577 

Rider Family, LeRoy, Genesee Co., N. Y., - 580-581 

Colby Family.- ... . 586 and 796-797 

Hon. John Child, Weybridge, Vt.. - - - 583-584 

Hon. John A. Child, Weybridge, Vt., 585 

Boston Family. 

John Child and descendants. ... . 595-604 

Prof. Francis J. Child Ph. D. Harvard University, - 599 

Francis Child, Boston, Mass.. Tremont St., G00-<)01 

Benjamin G. Child, Boston, Mass., - 602 

Nicholas G. Child, Boston, Mass., - - 603 

Richard D. Child, ... 603 

Barnstable Family. 

Samuel Child and Descendants, - - 605-681 

Richard Child, Barnstable, Mass , - - 600 

Dea. Samuel Child, Barnstable, Mass., - 606 

Ralph Childs, Providence. R, I., - - 609-610 

Lebbeus Childs, Conway, Mass., 013 

Oliver Childs, Seneca. N. Y.. - - 613 

Theron H. Childs, Seneca, N. Y., - - - 614 

Edmund Childs, Wheatland, Mich., - 615 

Charles E. Childs, Norwich, N. Y., - - - 617 

) Jonathan Childs, Hardwick, Mass., 620 

Benjamin W. Childs, Barre, Mass., - - (i.'l 

Francis Lee Childs, Barre, Mass., - - 623 

Dea. Martin Luther Childs, Springfield, Mass., - <'>'.?4 

Maj. Jonathan Childs, Wilmington, Vt., - - 629-630 

John Lusk Childs, Boston, Mass., - - - 634-636 

Laban J. Childs, Council Bluffs, Iowa, - 633 

Maj. Adnah B. Childs, Wilmington, Vt., - 637-638 

Wm. II . Childs, San Francisco. Cal., - - 639-040 

Asaph P. Childs, Bennington, Yt , - 641 

K. Haskins, Esq.. Brattleborough, Vt., - - 641-642 

Ebenezer Childs. Shutesbury, Mass., - - - 643 

Ebenezer Child. M. D., Shutesbury, Mass., <>44 

Charles!). Childs, York, Livingston Co., X. Y. - - 645 

Charles Dwight Childs, Ionia, Mich., ■ 646 

David Childs, Conway, Mass., - - - 648 

Rogers Family, Conway, Mass., 650-651 

Otis Child. Conway, Mass., - - - 651 

Silas D. Child, Montreal, Canada, - - 664 

Silas D Child, Utiea, N. Y., - - . - 665 

Timothy Childs, M. D , Pittsfield, Mass., - - - <I7<'-871 



XII. CONTENTS. 

Perry Childs, Cazenovia, N. Y.. - - - . • 671 

Lieut. Gov. Henry H. Childs, Pittsfield, Mass., - - 673-674 

David W. Childs." Utiea, N. Y., - - 673 

Rev. Geo. S. Boardman D. I> , Cazenovia, N. Y , - 672-673 

Ledyard Family and Powers, - - - . 674-676 

Gen. Thomas Childs, U. S. Army, - 677 

Gen. David P. Woodbury, U. S. Army, - - - 678 

Reuben Childs and Descendants, - . - 682-691 

Mrs. Mary K. Childs Lowrie, and Hon. Walter Lowrie, - 684-686 
Rev. Thomas S Childs, D. D., and Mrs. Mary P. Childs, 

Wooster Univ. Ohio, - - - - - 689-690 

Swansea Branch. 

Jeremiah Child and Descendants, .... 692-711 

Capt. George Child, (commanding the 'Lexington,") R. I., 700 

Watertown Link, No. 2. 

Benjamin Child and descendants, - - 712-723 

Bigelow Family, Jackson, Tenn., - - - 718-720 

Webster and Breed Families, California, - - 723 

Amherst Child, Rutland, Mass., ... 724 

Hon. A. L. Childs, Waterloo, Seneca, Co., N. Y., - 727-728 

Charles Child. Woodstock, Ct.. - - - - - 729 

Issachar Child, Woodstock, Ct , - - 732-733 

Casper Childs, New York City, - - - 732 

George D. Child, Chicago, 111., - - 733 

Pennsylvania Family. 

Henry Child and Descendants, - - - 734-754 

Cephas Child, Plumstead, Pa., - - 735. 

Moses Child, Mayfield. N. V.. 738 

Mahlon M. Child, Wilmington, Del., ... 739 

Cadwallader Child. Phil., Jeff. Co., N. Y.. - - 739-740 

Wattson Childs, Manchester, Iowa, ... - 741 

Hamilton Child, Syracuse, N. Y., - - 741-742 

Lewis J. Child, Philadelphia, Jeff. Co., N. Y., - - - 742 

Henry Teas Child, M. D., Philadelphia, Pa., - 744 

Isaac Child, "Friend Minister," Pa., . - 745 

George W. Childs, Philadelphia, Pa,, - 750-757 

Nathaniel Child and Descendants. - - - 757-766 

Nathaniel Childs, Jr., Washington, D. C, - - - 761-762 

Unattached Families. ... - 766-790 

Appendices, - - 791-810 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page. 

1. Child Coat of Arms. - • - - ii. 

2. Ephraim Child Residence, 79 

3. Warren G. Child, - - - 103 

4. Hon. Linus Child, - 143 

5. A. L. Child, M. D., C-CWmxL;) 151 

6. Henry Child Residence, - 173 

7. Elias Child, - 225 

8. Prof. S. F. B. Morse, LL. D.. 261 

9. Isaac Child, - - 411 

10. Col. Asa Child, 513 

11. Francis Child, - - - 601 

12. Maj. Adnah B. Childs, 637 

13. George W. Chills. - - 751 



EXPLANATIONS. 

To the name of each individual is attached a number This number will 
indicate that individual wherever found, proving an additional means of 
identification ; necessary where names are so often repeated. 

The following abreviations have been used b. for born; m. for married; 
d. for died; yg. for young; da. or dau. for daughter. 



ERRATA. 

Page 147. No. 28. — Read Ruth Curtis, not Ruth Ammidown, as found twice 

on this page; again No. 641. 
Page 417. No. 641. — Read Dudley, not Daniel Chase. This marriage linked 
the family with the U. S. Senator Dudley Chase, Bishop Philander 
Chase, both brothers of Mercy Chase, who married Stephen Child No. 
641, and a later generation, the late Chief Justice Salmon Chase who 
was a nephew of Mercy Chase Child. Ruth Child, No. 646, not Harris 
left one son Samuel M. Chase. 
Page 148. — Read Abner Palmer, not Abraham. Chas. Palmer. 

151. — Read in line 17, Meteorology, not Metallurgie. 

126. xxx.— Read Alfred DeForest Childs, not Arthur C. 

238. No. 1449.— Read Ida, not Ada. 

226. — Foot note, read Mrs. Sylvina Thorp Child's family. 

182. No. 938 — Read Louisa, not Loisa. 

285. No. 1851 —Read Hannah B. Holmes. 

485. No. 4449 — Read Mary Blanchard Malcom. 

723. 7078. — Read Samuel Capen, not Chopin Child. 

418. No. 3566. — Read Mildred Lee, not Milinda. She was the daugh- 
ter of the distinguished General Henry Lee. of revolutionary fame of 
Virginia, and sister of Robert E. Lee. the late Confederate general; the 
same change from Milinda to Mildred should be observed when repeated. 
Page 404. No. 3427. — Read Fitz Henry Morse, not Fitzhugh. Same change 
should be observed where Fitzhugh is repeated, page 405, Nos. 3435, 
3436, 3437. 
Page 210. No. 1234.— Should read Hale, not Hall. 

233. No. 1403. — Read Angeline Coats, not Augusta. 

285. No. 1850. — Read Hannah Holmes, not Howes, and again 1851, 
where William Childs is taken over read Hannah Holmes. 

485. No. 4449.— Read Mary Blanchard Malcom. 

508. Read No. 4747.— Josiah Child. 

510. No. 4762.— Read Mehitable Flagg, not Taft. 

578. No. 5491. — Read Freeman Childs, not Truman, 

496. No. 4549. — Read Sarah Piatt, not Sarah Norcross. 

723. No. 7078. — Read Capen, not Chapin. Same page read Mary 
Burditt, not Burdell. 

634. No. 6240.— Read Mrs. Hitchcock, not Alvord. 

473. Nos 4291, 4292.— Read Brigham, not Bingham. 

396. No. 3331— Read William Bennett, not Burnett. 

332. No. 2454 —Date of birth of Ellen Louisa Child read 1845. 



INTRODUCTION. 



Not infrequently concurrent influences draw one into a line 
of activities unsought and unlooked for. By such a method 1 
have been led to undertake the work of preparing a Genealogy 
of the Child, Childe or Childs family, and alliances by marriaj 
in the United States and the Canadas. 

The name has been variously spelled in this country for years, 
taking on sometimes the terminal "e," but more often the termi- 
nal "&" For the first two generations in this country the name 
was written Child. Occasionally at an early period the terminal 
u e' was used. But later the "s" has been more frequently em- 
ployed. Upon whatever principle the change may be explained, 
it seems unfortunate for the preservation of the integrity of the 
family, as the effect is sometimes to lead members of the 
same branch to lose sight of their kindred. We have aimed 
scrupulously to write the name in this volume as written by 
those who have furnished their record ; deeming it our duty how- 
ever, to be governed by the public records where the fathers of 
the lines have observed the English method of spelling the 
name. Not a few using the terminal "s" have expressed to me 
regret that it had been added to their name. In this connection 
it occurs to us to suggest a return to the original mode of spell- 
ing the name with the terminal il e"' as written upon its transla- 
tion in Great Britain from its Norman Frank form, might now 
be accomplished, as the different branches are awakened to an 
interest in their family history. This would meet the objection 
felt by some as to the brevity of the name, and its easy confu- 
sion with the common noun. This proposed change has been 
spoken of to some of the leading ones of different branches 
who are quite ready to fall in with it. 

It is approaching three years since I was first made acquainted 
with the fact that Mr. Isaac Child of Boston, Mass., a descendant 
in direct line like myself from Benjamin Child, the emigrant, 
had for many years been gathering the statistics of the early 

B 



10 INTRODUCTION. 

families of the New England emigrants of our name and their 
descendants. This information was given me by Hon. William 
Graves Child, M. D., of Bath, Grafton county, N". H., whose 
special interest in behalf of a Genealogy of the family name 
was awakened by the connection of his immediate branch with 
the D wight family, and whose family record is extensively re- 
corded in Dr. D wight's Genealogy; an early ancestor of Dr. 
Child having married a daughter of Rev. Josiah Dwight, who 
was ordained and settled as the first Congregational minister of 
Woodstock, Ct., in 1690. It was upon the suggestion of Dr. 
Child that I was led to entertain the purpose of attempting a 
Genealogy on the basis of Mr. Isaac Child's material. After 
much deliberate reflection, I decided to undertake the task of 
reviving the memories of those who had passed away, and 
placing their names with those now upon the stage, in a form 
of permanent record. In the incipient stages of the work, a 
slumbering affection for the memory of those whom in child- 
hood I had been taught to revere was quickened, and incidents 
of early and later life, almost forgotten, or thought of occasion- 
ally as of no great significance, began to be recalled. I could 
see in them a moral, conveying thoughts noble, inspiring, and 
instructive. To bring these memories into a form, and weave 
these incidents into a web of sufficient interest to attract intelli- 
gent members of the great fraternity, seemed indeed a work of 
much labor and not a little delicacy, yet not without some com- 
pensating pleasure. The circle of family friends of near kin- 
ship, with whom I found myself allied at the commencement, 
has been enlarging, till almost thousands are now numbered in 
a quasi kinship, with many of whom, by a daily handshaking 
through epistolary correspondence, I seem to be brought into 
bonds of warmest friendship. There is much of common inter- 
est, so much of sentiment and sympathy in common, our expe- 
riences are found to run naturally in a common channel. 

Correspondence was opened with Mr. Child of Boston, who 
had hitherto been unknown to me, which led to an arrangement 
with him for placing in my hands the material which he had, 
to be incorporated in the proposed Genealogy. His matter 
forms the nucleus of this work ; not that it constitutes the larger 
amount, nor that it was arranged, as incorporated in this work. 
The filling up of many branches, partially traced by Mr. Isaac 



[NTRODUCTION. , 11 

Child, and the discovery of many new lines, will swell the vol- 
ume to threefold or more beyond his material. Vet had it 
been for his industry and perseverance, it is probable the ] 
ent work would not have been undertaken. 

The scope of my plan takes a wider range than thai 
braced in his manuscript. His record has not gone outside of 
the New England emigrants ami their descendants: nor doe- it 
extend, with but few exceptions, to the female members of 
family and their descendants. The present plan embraces all 
of the name, whether traceable to New England emigrants, or 
to ancestors known to have come to our shores at other points, 
and at later periods. I trace also the descendants of the female 
members, as well as the males to the latest dates. 

It was not possible to foresee the amount of labor and expend- 
iture of money which would be required, nor the numberless oc- 
casions of delay, before the work could be completed. Much is 
due to the earnest desires expressed by many prominent in the 
branches they represent, that the work should go on to comple- 
tion, that it has not been abandoned long ago as a hopeless 
task. For it was early discovered that a superficial production 
would not only prove unsatisfactory, but be held, as one mem- 
ber expressed it. "with intolerable loathing." There is no lack 
of intelligence in this widespread family. It would be wo 
than folly in an enterprise of this kind to ignore this intelli- 
gence; and it is with not a little pride and self-gratulation that 
I record the fact that words of cheer have reached me from out- 
side the family name. — from those who view such works as ;i 
benefaction to the race: among these is one of New York's 
most enlightened and patriotic statesmen — Hon. Horatio Sey- 
mour. Ex-Governor of this State. In a letter dated Utica. Julv 

i %j 

10, 1879. he writes: 

Dear Sir: I am glad that you mean to get up a record of your family. 
I have known some of its branches, and held them in high regard. Gene- 
alogies do not merely gratify curiosity. They tend to elevate, because they 
keep in men's minds the character of the best of their race: and these 1" - 
come standards of morals and positions, which men aim to equal. The 
commandment that we should honor our fathers has purposes more wide and 
far reaching than is usually supposed. I hope you will go on with your 
work. I am truly yours, &c, 

EUns Child, Esq.. Utica. Horatio Seymour. 



12 



INTRODUCTION. 



In the earlier stages of the work I received, unsolicited, the 
following generous note from Rev. Theophilus Packard, who 
was for fifty years a citizen of Shelburne, Mass., and twenty- 
five years of that time pastor of the Congregational Church in 
that town : 

Dear Sir:— I have had sufficient experience in such work (Genealogies) to 
sympathise with you in the difficulties and delays which must have tried 
your patience. Yours is a worthy undertaking; and will, if completed, be 
more highly appreciated by future generations than by those now living. I 
shall be glad to assist in your work. I have many valuable statistics as to 
the tribes of Childses, and will gladly and gratuitously furnish them to you 
if you deem them suited to your profound work. 

Wishing you success in your enterprise, I am, respectfully, yours, &c," 

Theophilus Packard. 

Additional encouragement is derived from a monthly Journal 
published in New York city by the "American College of Her- 
aldry and Genealogical Registry,'' brief extracts from which I 
quote : 

There is an importance attached to carefully written accounts of the ori- 
gin and dispersion of the individuals of a family, becoming more essential 
as population increases in this vast country, the asylum of all nationalities. 

Often the rights of heritage, through a neglect of records systematically 
kept in the family, or public documents properly guarded and certified to 
by qualified officials, are imperiled or utterly lost. Great estates in Eu- 
rope are lost entirely to heirs who might have had wealth and position had 
their parents been careful to bring with them when emigrating to the Uni- 
ted States, documentary evidence of their lineage in their fatherland. 

A few have been fortunate in securing a rich competency to which they 
had never supposed themselves entitled on account of the many heirs be- 
tween themselves and an estate; but who in the revolutions of society have 
suddenly and unexpectedly emerged from poverty to wealth, on the strength 
of the testimony of a record in a long forgotten book, hardly known to exist, 
in which was chronicled their descent from a remote ancestry; only known 
to them through the declarations of a court of chancery. 

The indifference of some, and the positive aversion of others, 
to Genealogies, may break the force of such testimony as these 
extracts afford, yet they are the views of men of experience 
and sound judgment. The wisdom of the cautionary language 
here employed to guard against indifference and neglect on this 
point, finds confirmation in actual cases of estates waiting for 
claimants of our own family name. There are credits in the 



INTRODUCTION. 13 

Bank of England, in stocks and money, 'against the followi 
names : 

Elizabeth Child, \ 

Jane Child, [ 

Henry Childs, All dating back to 1813-1818. 

Richard Child, \ 

Martha Child, / 

Also in the Bank of England, there have long been credits 
waiting for claimants in the heirs of Ann Child, John Child. 
Sarah Child, Anthony Child, Thomas Child, William Child. 
Mary Child. These properties have been several times adver- 
tised, as attested by J. P. Jayne, Commissioner. 

We are seldom indifferent to the opinions of our friends, and 
when they coincide with ours, or may be somewhat in advance, 
they lend encouragement and force to our schemes ; and it is a 
pleasure to place them on record, when in form to be preserved. 
From one of the many communications from the pen of Judge 
William Child of Fairlee, Vt, the following extract warmly 
endorses our enterprise : 

I would say there is a pleasure in erecting monuments of marble or 
granite or other material to the memory of our relatives. Why may not our 
pleasure or gratification be greatly increased by the possession of a volume 
containing a brief mention of all the families of our name, whether near or 
remote, to which we can at any time refer, and ponder upon their good 
qualities of head and heart therein recorded, and try to emulate or excel in 
all the virtues that pertain to any individual or family of our name. Sums 
great and small are continually being expended in erecting memorials to our 
departed relatives; the smallest of such sums would probably purchase 
many volumes of the work upon which you are engaged, and which would 
be as valuable as inscriptions on monumental marble. 

Professor Francis Joseph Child, LL. D., of Harvard Uni- 
versity, who does not claim to have made the Genealogy of his 
family a special study, says: 

I do not see how a human being should not be glad to know what was his 
kith and kin, when some one is able to tell him. For one, I thank you and 
Mr. Isaac Child for the interesting information I have derived, and expeel 
to derive, from the volume preparing. 

The almost universal approval of the object set forth in the 
circulars and letters sent out, renders it difficult to draw a line 
that may not seem to undervalue the kindly offices of many in 
helping in our common enterprise. Yet we fail not to appre- 



14 INTRODUCTION. 

ciate the smallest service, while we specially note the more 
marked efforts of a goodly number of the friends: 

Daniel B. Childs, Esq. of New York city, was among the ear- 
liest who prepared a lengthy and lucid record of the prolific 
branch to which he belongs. Mrs. Alice Walker Child of East 
Woodstock, Ct., whose fourscore years are a storehouse of use- 
ful memories, is entitled to special recognition for her volun- 
tary and effective services in gathering material for this book. 
George Walker, Esq. of Northford, Ct., who has the blood of 
two most worthy families in his veins, has poured out the riches 
of a mind well stored with historical facts and chronological 
statistics to enrich the volume. Mrs. E. M. Childs Haskins of 
Brattleboro, Vt.,has been indefatigable in collecting records and 
tracing different lines in the branches of her own and other fam- 
ilies. Mrs. William G. Child of North Woodstock, Ct., has 
been an earnest and untiring worker in this enterprise. Mrs. 
Cynthia Child May of North Woodstock, Ct, has manifested a 
laudable interest and rendered valuable service in hunting up 
records and supplying interesting incidents. Mr. Elias Child of 
East Woodstock, Ct., who has passed away since this work 
commenced, greatly facilitated our labor by putting into our 
hands a transcript of the Woodstock records, as far as relating 
to the Child family. Wm. H. Childs, Esq. of Niagara Falls, 
N. Y., was an early and zealous advocate and helper, whose 
earnestness gave much impulse to the work. Miss Alma Childs, 
daughter of Hon. Aaron Childs of Ypsilanti, Mich., has wrought 
cheerfully and effectively in the work. Mrs. E. A. B. Child 
Eice of Lyons, N. Y, an octogenarian, has devoted much time 
with good results. Franklin S. Childs, Esq. of Grinnell, Iowa, 
has been a faithful gleaner of essential material. Roswell Child, 
Esq. of Moretown, Vt, has done much. Alexander B. Child, 
Esq. of Granville, Vt., has done good service. Hon. A. L. Childs 
of Waterloo, N. Y, editor of the Seneca Neius, has rendered 
kindly aid Through the channels of his popular weekly. Al- 
bert Baxter, Esq., editor of Grand Rapids Eagle, Michigan, has 
rendered aid through his columns and otherwise. Jonathan 
Child, Esq. of Rochester, Lewis J. Child, Esq. of Philadelphia, 
Jeff. Co., N. Y, Nathaniel Childs of Washington, D. C, War- 
ren Gould Child, Esq., Ogden City, Moses R. Chamberlain, Esq., 
Bradford, Vt, Miss Jennie Child of Bath, N. H., and many 



INTRODUCTION. 15 

others whose friendly offices might be named, we sincerely 

thank. 

To Mr. Addison Child of Boston, is due an especial and hearty 
tribute. His scholarly researches in the United States and 
Great Britain have furnished us the fascinating and instructive 
article upon the "Origin of the Name" and very largely the 
resume of the "English Families." 

I should fail in my duty did 1 neglect to recognize before the 
public the efficient aid rendered by my wife, Mrs. S. P. Cleave- 
land Child, whose autograph has so often appeared in the copi- 
ous correspondence demanded in the preparation of this volume, 
and who has been a judicious counsellor and essential helper in 
its compilation. I have no censures for any who confess they 
feel rio interest in a family Genealogy. Our tastes and judg- 
ments are formed from different surroundings, and must neces- 
sarily differ somewhat in their character. What to one is a 
pleasure, to another may be an object of aversion or indiffer- 
ence. So if any have neglected to reply to our courteous re- 
quests for family record, or sent a curt response, we accept their 
estimate. 

To meet a feeling that may have obtained to some extent 
that this enterprise is purely a business affair, entered upon 
from mercenary motives ; and that honorable business rules 
have been ignored, I desire here more fully to explain my 
position. 

The work was commenced under the impression that six 
months, or at most one year only, would be required to com- 
plete it. It was supposed that the material was already col- 
lected ; that it only needed proper arrangement, historically and 
chronologically, to be ready for the press. But it was early 
apparent that much remained to be done by way of collecting 
material, if anything like a satisfactory Genealogy was to be 
prepared. Having advanced to a point where the field could be 
more fully surveyed, it was seen that a work had been entered 
upon whose end lay far in the distant future. To abandon the 
work would disappoint many whose efforts had placed in our 
hands much valuable material, and, whose enthusiasm had in- 
spired in us sanguine hopes of ultimate success, though the 
road should prove long in reaching the end. There seemed to 
be no alternative but to continue the work, relying upon the 



16 INTRODUCTION. 

magnanimity of a family with whom it is our pride to be con- 
nected, and whose interest for our success had been so often 
and distinctly announced, to shield us from essential loss. 

Under the impression, presumably, that the sale of the book 
would reimburse outlays and compensate fairly for time spent, 
the pecuniary responsibility has been left to myself. I have 
assumed it not from my abundant wealth, but from a confidence 
that the many embraced in the family who would want a book 
would make the burden light. 

The estimated cost of the book at $5.00 per copy was made 
upon the basis of an issue of five hundred copies and of more 
than one hundred pages less than the present volume contains. 
And although only about two hundred copies have been or- 
dered, I have decided to publish, trusting there will be,' after 
its issue, the full compliment of five hundred copies called for. 

While my pecuniary circumstances would not justify indif- 
ference to the results of my labors and expenditures, I have 
never allowed myself to ignore legitimate business principles. 
The doctrine of a quid pro quo I fully recognize. But I have 
been shut up to the necessity of the utmost economy, (not un- 
derstanding in the beginning what the burdens were to be,) in 
order to make the enterprise pay the necessary outlay. I have 
asked no service, however, of such as were not known or sup- 
posed to be interested equally with myself in preserving the 
records of the family name and alliances by marriage, for which 
I have not paid or offered a full compensation. Those of the 
family name and those allied by marriage, I have treated in my 
correspondence more as allies embarked with me in a common 
cause; such I have found, with few exceptions, ready coadjutors. 
In two or three instances I have accidentally come upon those 
that are allied who were preparing some history of the special 
branch with which they were connected, but with all due def- 
ference have refrained from unfriendly interference with their 
rights. I sa} T this much because I have been misapprehended, 
and consequently unjustly censured. 

Our friends may look for greater perfection in the compi- 
lation of this work than it is possible for ordinary intelligence 
to produce. Errors in dates and names and possibly in inci- 
dents will occur, while special care has been taken on our part to 
secure the greatest exactitude. These errors may arise in some 



INTRODUCTION. 17 

instances from oversight on our part, or they may occur from 

illegible chirography. or from differences in the reports of dif- 
ferent members of a family widely separated and unable to 
compare notes previous to sending their records; reliance on 

memory and erroneous tradition may bring out a false record. 
In view of the-manifold difficulties it would be a marvel if no 
errors were discovered. 

Failures to find a complete record will appear in almost any 

branch. This should not be chargeable to us. We have writ- 
ten and waited long for returns, which either do not come or if 
sent in part it is with the announcement that the records have 
been lost or have never been kept : and memory and tradition 
can supply but imperfectly. Such incidents show the value of 
a family GreneaL >gy deposited where casualties could not destn >y 
the entire record : scattered among a numerous family and 
placed, as copies usually are, in public libraries. 

Our efforts to bring out a Genealogy that should meet the 
reasonable expectations of those who are interested have not 
been limited to letter correspondence ; this has been extensive 
and ought to have accomplished a great deal more. We have 
visited in person, or by paid agents, state and city libraries, 
county and town records, in several different states, and spent 
many days in searching records to discover missing links in 
branches of families whose records have been given to us in- 
complete, or to establish some important historical point. 

Our sincere thanks are due and heartily tendered to the 
librarians of the following public libraries : New York State 
Library, at Albany, N. Y. ; Astor and Mercantile Libraries, 
New York City; State Library, at Hartford. Conn. ; Springfield 
and Worcester. Mass., public libraries: Historical Library, of 
Worcester. Mass. We also recognize the gentlemanly attentions 
of county and town clerks, who have rendered us ready facili- 
ties for examining such records as could afford us aid in our 
work. 

All sources of information known to hold out promise of suc- 
cess we have explored and exhausted to make the work com- 
plete. Any failure to secure the most satisfactory results can- 
not be more a matter of regret with others than with ourseh 
Future research may reveal the link connecting the American 
emigrants wi.th the English ancestor. The friends can not fail 



18 INTRODUCTION. 

to appreciate the difficulties lying in the way of securing a 
complete record. 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

A brief resume of some of the prominent characteristics of 
the family may afford pleasant reflections to the reader. If we 
have not failed to form just opinions from the examinations of 
early public records, and the historical sketches sent us by de- 
scendants of ancestors, and of cotemporaries, there is not a little 
to admire and imitate. 

A spirit of enterprise is a feature of the family which will not 
escape the notice of the reader. A desire to improve their con- 
dition draws them on in new enterprises and efforts to make 
the most of life. They possess enough of the impulsive ele- 
ment to defy dangers and to grapple with difficulties to obtain 
a manly independence. As pioneers, no class of men can show 
a better record. There has been a constant migration of suc- 
cessive generations till, from the Atlantic shores, they have 
spread over the continent. Sober, industrious, frugal, and with 
a good degree of intelligence, they have known how to use the 
appliances of life wisely and effectively to construct comfortable 
homes and rear intelligent and virtuous families. 

One may well be amazed at the incidents in the histories of 
not a few recorded in this volume. The determination and per- 
severance with which many have met and overcome difficulties, 
and the boldness and daring in adventure displayed in others, 
will thrill the reader and awaken his admiration, if he has a 
spark of enthusiasm in his composition. 

In pursuits, the family is largely agricultural ; yet it has its 
representatives in the various industries of the country. In 
every generation there are found shrewd and prosperous trades- 
men. Men of inventive genius in the mechanic arts, successful 
manufacturers, and men of thrift in the lesser trades. While 
few can boast of large fortunes, as measured by present stand- 
ards, the conditions of medium wealth are usually attained. 

For general intelligence and virtue it has a fair record. Edu- 
cation and high culture have been regarded as essential in every 
generation. The number who have enjoyed the opportunity 
of a liberal education will favorably compare with most other 
American families. The proportion who have been employed 
as public teachers is strikingly large. 



INTRODUCTION". 19 

Among the educated class there have been those who have 
risen to prominence in all the learned professions. The legal, 
the medical and the clerical representatives of the family, in 
many cases, have attained to no mean eminence. Literary 
ability and acquirements are by no means lacking. We often 
find the love of knowledge drawing them away from the bustle 
and ambitions of life into the quiet seclusions of the study, 
where they find their sweetest companionship with some his- 
tory, romance, or philosophical treatise. 

Another prominent feature of this family is its patriotism. 
None have been more ready to expose themselves to the hard- 
ships of the camp and the dangers of the battle field than the 
emigrants and their descendants. They have often risked and 
sacrificed their all to save their country. Military fame has fol- 
lowed not a few from the battle field, while many from the rank 
and file have borne for life the scars of many a hard-fought battle. 
Many of the early emigrants were in the Indian and French 
wars ; their descendants were in the revolutionary struggles ; 
then again in the war of 1812; later in the Mexican war, and 
finally in the civil war, from 186 1 to 1865, which closed a 
bloody era in the nation's history. In the revolutionary period 
twenty-two (22) of the family name were of the first company 
of volunteers and minute men, on the outbreak of hostilities, 
when Lexington, Mass., was attacked by the British, April 19, 
1775. In the following list, which embraces the above twenty- 
two Massachusetts patriots, many of the descendants will re- 
cognize their ancestral head : 

Aaron Child, Jonathan Child, 

Abel Child, Joshua Child, 

Abijah Child, Josiah Child, 

Abraham Child. Lemuel Child, 

Daniel Child, Moses Child, 

David Child, Phineas Child, 

Elijah Child. Reuben Child, 

Elisha Child, Silas Child. 

Isaac Child, Samuel Child, 

John Child, Solomon Child, 

Jonah Child, Timothy Child. 

A manly independence has ever been more to the race than 
fame or wealth or position, while none of these would be de- 



20 INTRODUCTION. 

spised or rejected if they were the legitimate rewards of indus- 
try and virtue. 

As benefactors of their race they are usually sympathetic and 
active : they abhor oppression ; they are earnest advocates of 
equal rights. No wrong stirs their blood so certainly as that 
which is inflicted by the exercise of irresponsible and arbitrary 
power. Their philanthropy is not limited to that form of op- 
pression which draws its life from organized agencies. It 
reaches to its subtler forms as found in individual character and 
in social life. It is not less their mission as benefactors to em- 
ploy such appliances as Providence has placed in their hands 
to rescue their fellow men from ignorance, degradation and 
crime. Their benefactions are distributed upon the broadest 
principles of Christianity. 

It is a family of decided religious tendencies. The early 
emigrants came to this western world with essentially just re- 
ligious ideas ; with longings for freedom of conscience denied 
them in the fatherland. Their deep religious convictions are 
evinced in the conscientious observance of the institutions of 
our Christian religion. A spirit of toleration has marked its re- 
ligious history. Independent thought has had full scope ; and 
different religious creeds and philosophical theories have come 
to exist, yet the mass have built their religious opinions upon 
the Bible, substantially as interpreted by the Reformers of the 
16th and 17th centuries. They have a profound reverence for 
the Bible. While some of the opinions of the early ancestors 
are received in a modified form at the present period, the es- 
sential truth, as taught in the Divine Book, is warmly cher- 
ished and insisted on as constituting the only true basis of sound 
morality, and a rational theory of accountability to the I'ivine 
Lawgiver. 

In politics they have distinct and differing opinions, which 
are maintained with characteristic earnestness and persistency. 

It may be of interest to know the impression of a thoughtful 
and observing member belonging to one of the largest and most 
intelligent branches as to some of the characteristics of the 
family. I take pleasure, therefore, in giving an extract from a 
recent letter from Rev. Increase Child of Frewsburgh. Chautau- 
qua county, N. Y.: 



[NTRODUCTION. 21 

I should like to give you some of my impressions in regard to the Child 
family. I hope, too, you will somewhere in your work endeavor to give 
-(imc df the more prominenl characteristics of our family, [would say thai 
during my early life 1 was told over and over again that I was not a Child, 
imt a Deake, my mother's boy. So thai 1 used to think of the child family 
as almost another family. For that reason I have thought thai 1 could think 
and speak of them somewhat impartially and independently: and I have 
often taken a foolish pride in trying to do so. As I have grown older, friends 
have often said to me. "You are getting to be more of a Child than yon 
used to be;" and it seems so to me also. However this may I.e. I feel a. 
great aversion to being made conspicuous. Sometimes 1 suffer very much 
from this feeling. I like to see and hear all that is going on. but give me a 
quiet seat in the corner. I think this is characteristic of our family. Per- 
haps our natural love of ease is at the bottom of it. 1 have heard my 
father say many times that the Child family were lazy. I do not admit 
that, as we commonly use language, but perhaps there is some ground for 
it. especially if it be true, as old Dr. Wayland used to say, that mankind 
are as lazy as they can lie. Of the family, my impressions are derived, 
first, from my grandfather, Judge Salmon Child and his brothers; and sec- 
ond, from my own observation. x My impression is that they are a benevo- 
lent, virtuous and intelligent people; not particularly ambitious, loving 
ease and quiet, but possessed of a considerable degree of latent power, which 
has never been developed as it should have been. They are a people wdio 
love to read and speculate; love their friends, love to have friends and serve 
them, and are not particularly adapted to the accumulation of property. 
My impression is that they love order and a good style of things, and are 
sufficiently conservative to keep them from an extreme radicalism or fanati- 
cism. At the same time they wish to know the reason of things too well to 
follow a blind orthodoxy; in other words, there is a certain tendency to 
rationalism. Hence, instead of the old New England orthodoxy, you find 
Baptists, Methodists and Universalists, even, amongthem. So far as Iknow 
the Child family, they love liberty and have a deep-seated hatred of oppres- 
sion of every form: a people of quick sympathies and impulsive nature, 
capable of enjoying much and suffering much. A people who have accom- 
plished much, but who ought to have accomplished much more. Their love 
of ease and of the pleasures of knowledge and refinement, as well as love of 
home has often prevented them from achieving what they were capable of. 

This estimate accords with mvown convictions, derived from 
my correspondence and personal knowledge of many members 
of the family. 

In a brief recapitulation of some of the characteristics of 
this family, viz., its robust character, mentally and physically, 
its general intelligence, its enterprise, its independence in 
thought and action, its sobriety and industry, its patriotism and 
philanthropy, and its reverence for divine authority — it will be 
found that it is a fair inference that these elements aptly consti- 
tute the family a valuable factor in rearing the structures of 



22 INTRODUCTION. 

prosperous communities, for which they challenge the respect 
and confidence of their fellow citizens. 

Carl yle says, " the writers of newspapers, pamphlets, books, 
poems — these are the real working, effective church of a mod- 
ern country." The compilers of this book feeling the desira- 
bility that all persons should be made acquainted with the char- 
acters, noble deeds and experiences of their ancestry, and recog- 
nizing the fact that such knowledge is not born with a person, 
but must come by cultivation on these topics, have sought so to 
embody the results of their explorations and collations, as to 
make the work as truly instructive and elevating as it can be 
entertaining, or suitable for mere matter of reference. 

The tradition handed down in many branches as we have 
found, that from three emigrant brothers have sprung all of the 
name, must be overturned by the record as we find it. A like 
tradition has been widespread in other families, witli no better 
foundation. 

Our pleasant labor is ended : its results you have. That our 
success will be variouslv estimated is a matter of course. We 
deprecate no fair criticism, but crave your acceptance of our 
honest effort to give a true report of our honest, honorable fam- 
ily (whose nobility is that Of the higher nature), in plain ungar- 
nished Anglo-Saxon phrase. 

Elias Child. 



Origin and Etymology of the Surname Child. 



The name Child, in common with many other modem names, 
is derived from Hildr of the Norse mythology. The name of 
this deity can in turn be traced to the rudimental and inter- 
changeable al, el, il, ol, the feracious root of many terms and 
words expressive of holiness, power, and supernatural attributes 
in all the languages and religions derived from the Ayrans. 
This would include the Solar and Hellenic myths from which 
the Norse came, and. the Jewish Hagiology. Hild became 
synonymous with Bel with the Scandinavians, and hence a 
popular protonym with their belligerent descendants in the 
early warlike centuries. It also became a VaZkyrian term for 
maiden, and a fertile root in the nomenclature of the Norse 



sagas. 



Its dual significance and its descent from mythic to historical 
times can be traced in that beautiful epic, the Nebelungen Lied, 
the /Ziad of the north. 

After the " Love breathing Kreimhild " has supplanted the 
" Flower maiden BrynA ild " and immolated her entire family, 
she is herself taken off by £ft7c/ebrand (war sword). [The ety- 
mon has been italicized throughout and quotations made from 
the saga, to show its constant use.] 

" The King sat at the festive board beside the Queen Bvynhild " 
" Who never felt injured pang as when she saw Kreini7ti7(Z." 
******** 

•• It happened in those quiet times when good Queen Helchn died, 
That Etze/ rider of the Huns desiring other bride, 
Was by his friends and courtiers, told of Burgund's widow famed 
For lofty mind and perfect form, Kreimhild was she named." 
Etze? is supposed to have been Atala the " Scourge of God.'' 
He afterwards, according to Goldsmith, married /Mica (beauti- 
ful maid), and died on their nuptial night. Ch tide is first used 

as a title for King in this saga, 

" DethiVder the youthful Margravine, now gave her lily hand 
To Gishe/der. the youngest King of famous Burgund land." 
or, as rendered in a more graceful version, 

:i This done, with gentle gesture the damsel meek and mild 
By the hand yet trembling, took Gishe/der the Ghild( ." 
C 



24 ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILD. 

A son, of Jjryn/iilde. the " Flower maiden," 1 assumed the 
Burgundian throne in A. D. 466, under the title of Childperic 
(Battle Empire). His ponderous sword (almost as large as the 
wonderful Gram or Ba/mano- of his ancestor, forced bv Vo/and. 
the Norse VwZcan) was taken from his tomb in the last century, 
and is now preserved in the Louvre. A brother of Meroveus 
had previously, in A. D. 451, aided by AtaZa, made himself 
King of the Ripuarian Franks and taken the title of Childeric 
(Battle Splendor). He was converted from heathenism by his 
wife Clothilde, baptized Glochilde, whereupon the Pope be- 
stowed upon him the title of " first Christian King." and 
" eldest son of the church,'' which the legitimate kings of France 
proudly retained. He was succeeded by Childevic, the father of 
Childebert (Bright Warrior), who became King of the Parigii. 
Ama/ric, King of the Visigoths, married Childeherts sister. 
and was by him assassinated for his cruelty to her. 

Gaidoz, in his " French Folk Lore/' published in 187S, says 
that this sister was the heroine of the "Chanson de Cloiliilde" 
from which Perrault founded his story of La Barbe Bleue. 

Man}* of the kings of France prefixed Childe to their cogno- 
mens, from the fifth to the tenth centuries, after which the title 
descended to the eldest son. A large number of the kings, 
queens, and allodial rulers of Europe during this time, derived 
their appellation from this root. The Goths carried it to Spain. 
The great Visigothic Kins; Pe/avo, named his son Hildelans 
(Eager in war), but southern tongues refused to pronounce the 
harsh aspirate, and softened it into J7fonso, a title borne by some 
scores of kings since. The be/ligerent monk Hddebvand (war 
sword) carried his warlike name and sword (literally) to Italy, 
in the eleventh century, and by the help of the imperial jla- 
thilde, seated himself on the Papal throne. The Tuscans 
euphonized his Go/lie name into Aldovrandino. since borne by 
the Counts D'Este. While the Goths and Vandals were blend- 
ing their Norse terms with the Latin and Romance idioms of 
the south, hordes of Scandinavian and Teutonic adventurers 
were carrying their sharp swords and aspirated words to the 
shores of Great Britain. There is no pantographical history of 
Britain from the egress of the Romans to the ingress of the 
Teutons, or to the advent of the Norman French. The blurred 
record of the race-struggles, and the persistence of the fittest, is 



ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILt). 25 

written in the idiomatic names of their battlefields, bretwa 
and abiding places. The Norse war term Hild from the belli- 
cose spirit of the times, became a popular patron vm. Dooms- 
day Book 1 (A. D. 1083) registers over three hundred towns, and 
wapentakes (hundreds) bearing this synonym, with sullices 
indicating their environments and the tribe that adopted it, as 
Childewolde, Childness, Childtiiorpe, cote, ton, Childhan, by, bre, 
dale, ford, &c, besides many Latin terminations. CVYteconil*. 
now Childcomb, near Winchester, had nine churches at the time 
of the Domesday survey. But like the protographs of the pa- 
limsests, these allodial records have been so rewritten, over- 
written, overgrown and buried by newer accretions, that most 
of them are now veiled to all except to the skilled eye of the 
archaeologist. Although four out of the five British authors 
who wrote before the Conquest, Gri7das, Aldhe/me, Hi Ida of 
Lindisfarne, and Ahum, wore Thor's mark in their names, the} 7 
were soldiers of the* cross only, and wrote but little secular his- 
t( >rv. Some legends that floated down the stream of time were 
gathered by the early English writers. Robert of Gloucester 
preserved the legend of " Chylcle Waween, King Lothe's son." 
Lotus was a British king converted to Christianity about A. D. 
650. Morgan, in his England under the Normans, p. 135, says 
that " there are several persons in Domesday book, bearing the 
surname or title of Child, and among them the Kentish ^.mod, 
and Godewin, Abbot of Westminster," and that the " great 
Thanes of Kent, Child Jinod and his peers, guarded the king 
CEduuardy when he rode into Canterbury.'' He also says that. 
" Eduuard Child of Domesday Book, had a third part of the 
Archbishop of York's Church at Wyne in Lancashire ;" and 
Sporley says, that " Eduuinus, called Goduinus Childe. sue 

1 Domesday or Doomesday Book, a very ancient record, made in the time 
of William the Conqueror, which is now in the exchequer, in two volumes. 
The larger contains a survey of all .the lands in most of the counties in 
England, and the less, some counties not at first surveyed. The Book of 
Domesday was begun by five justices, assigned for that purpose in each 
county, in the year 1081, and finished in 1086. It was of such authority 
that the Conqueror himself submitted, in some cases wherein he was con- 
cerned, to be governed by it. Camden calls this book the Tax Book oj 
King William; and it was further called Magna Rolla. There is a third 
volume, made by order of the same king; and a fourth— an abridgement of 
the other books." 

- The dual letter, double u, is used throughout Doomesday Book. 



26 ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILD. 

ceeded his cousin Uualnoth as Abbott of Westminster, in 
1049," and that " in his time the church of Westminster was 
pulled down and rebuilt in more splendid style by Eduuard 
the Confessor," that he was of English descent and called Al- 
guui in one of the conqueror's charters and Palgrave, that 
" UiWnothe Childe of Sussex, sometimes called Thane of Sus- 
sex, was father of Groduuin who went with Canute to Denmark, 
afterwards the powerful Earl Godwin of Wessex." He married 
Grytha, All Jarl's sister, and their daughter Edgytha married 
Eduuard, who gained the sobriquet of Saint, or Confessor, by 
abjuring his marital right too continently." Hasted, in his 
History of Kent, says that A /nod Cyld was a younger brother 
of King Harofcl, who from the royalty of his kindred, had the 
addition of Oild" and that "one of his manors was given by 
William the Conqueror to Battle Abbey." Kilham and oth- 
ers assert that Leuuric Child of Doomesday Book, was Earl 
Leofric of Mercia and Coventry, the husband of Lady Grodiva, 
whose irresistible charms proved so fatal to poor Peeping Tom. 
Her personal merits are commemorated in song, stone, and stat- 
ute, and revived yearly by a civic procession in which her nai- 
vete is personated modo et formo. The term Childe is generally 
used as a title in Doomesday Book : indeed surnames were al- 
most unknown to Anglo-Saxon England, and were introduced 
by the Norman French during the last Saxon and first Norman 
reigns. The French prefix sur is a contraction from the Latin 
super, over, and the surname, as it indicates, was not at first 
written on the line with, bnt over the Christian name, between 
the lines, in smaller letters. It is so written over these names in 

Cild Cild Cild Cild 

Doomesday Book ; Eduuinus, Brixi, Leuuinus, Ulft. Ulft held 
wapentakes in Lincolns'cire, Snottings'cire (Nottingham), and 
Derbyshire. This would indicate that in these cases it was 
used as a sur, or over-name. It was used as the equivalent of 
prince and knight by the earliest writers. Nares says, prince, 
Lower, knight, and both that it was a title held by the eldest 
son of a king or earl, " until he inherited the title of his an- 
cestors or gained new honors by his prowess." 

" And yonder lives the Childe of Elle, 
A young and comely Knight.'* 

Percy's Reliques, 1-109. 



ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILD. 27 

"Chylde Rowland to the dark tower came." 

Lear iii. 4. 
"Chylde Tristam prayed that he might go,'' &c. 

Fairie Queen, vi. 34. 

A manuscript by Chaucer, now in the British Museum, 
quaintly commemorates the legend of "Childe Bristow." who 
gained his title not by noble descent or prowess in arms, but 
by devoting his patrimony in restitution of that wrongfully 
gotten, and in prayers for the redemption of his fathers soul 
from purgatory, after which new riches flowed in upon him ; 
he "First was rich and Sithen bare, and Sithen richer than ever 
he were." 

Byron's fictitious application of the historic Childe Harold to 
his hero, in fact to himself, is a euphemism : 

"Childe Harold was he hight; but whence his name 
And lineage long, it suits me not to say ; 
Suffice it that perchance they were of fame, 
And had been glorious in another day." 

The title, profession, calling, location, or some characteristic of 
the individual was generally adopted as the surname. As the 
title Childe became gradually obsolete it was generally adopted 
as a surname by descendants or dependants. Etymology indi- 
cates and former usage requires that the name should be writ- 
ten Childe. If the original or correct spelling is ever generally 
restored, it will distinguish the name from the noun. The per- 
centage of families of the name, retaining the original final "e," 
is larger in England than America, while those adding a final 
"s" is much less. None of the legitimate or higher families in 
England use the "5.'' About one in four of the name, graduates 
of Oxford University since 1856, have used "e" final, while 
none have added the "5.'' Of sixty-four of the names in the 
London Commercial Directory and twenty-six in the Court 
Directory for 1S78, fourteen and seven, respectively, add the 
final "s." The latter spelling is a solecism, and Childs is a 
misnomer of modern growth and uncertain origin. Probably 
it arose from a negligent retention of the apostrophic "s"' after 
the elision of the object and mark of the genitive case, as 
Childs for Child's (House), Childs broder for Child's brother, 
and Child's cote (side) appear as names in Doomesday B01 >k 

Eadulf Evilchild was made Thane of Northumbria by Edgar, 
in 971. We gather from the Camden Publications, that Walter 



28 ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILD. 

Childe was living near Hereford in 1 294, and was granted an 
annuity for life by Bishop Swinefield; that Thomas Childe 
was tenant of the Priory of St. Mary's, Worcester, in 1304 ; 
that Johani Childe lived near Finchdale, Durham, in 1362 ; and 
that Lawrence Child was Bishop of St. Asaph's in 1382 ; "That 
Thomas Childe presented the judges of Wigorn (Worcester) 
assizes with a lambe and vi. artichokes valued at 12 pence, in 
1601 ;" that Robert Chylde received a legacy from Sir Robert 
Cook, Vicar of Hawley, near Bury, Suffolk, in 1587. There 
are several instances in the early history of England where the 
name took the French form, L'Enfant. Indeed, although the 
term undoubtedly came to the Anglo-Saxon through the Frank - 
ish form of the Scandinavian, there are indications that it was 
also brought to Anglo-Norman England in the Latinized French 
names of the conqueror's followers. In 1350, Roger Baldwin, 
a descendant of the Bawd wins of the Roll of Battle Abbey 
married Jane, daughter of Wm. de Wigley by Alice LeChilde, 
great granddaughter of John L'Enfant, who married Emblema, 
daughter of Richard Acheley, descendant of William Achilles, 
named in the Festa de Nevelle of Henry Third's time. 

Having traced this Teutonic term from its apotheosis in the 
Norse mythology through a gradual avatar to a common sur- 
name in England and America, we will now trace its further 
descent and differentiation from a name to a noun, the correla- 
tive to parent, and follow it through some of its inflections. 
There has always been a tendency to appropriate and assimi- 
late titles and words of dignity from the specific to the generic. 
Such may have been the process whereby Child came to be a 
generic term for the young of the human species of either sex, 
and a declinable word. From an Ethnic term for Deity, it be- 
came that of supernatural attributes, and descended by divine 
right to kings ; by primogeniture to their eldest sons, by eti- 
quette to other sons, by usage to all sons, and by convenience 
to all human progeny, regardless of sex. The fact that this 
term was primarily restricted to males in England, would 
strengthen this view, if its equivalents in other dialects did not 
sometimes limit it to females. Some authorities, not very re- 
liable, have asserted that it was so used in Warwickshire. The 
fact that Shakespeare, in the 'Winter's Tale," makes the old 
shepherd exclaim on finding Perdita, 'What have we here? 



ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILD. 29 

Mercy on's, a barne, a very pretty barne; a boy or a child, 
I wonder?" has no1 much weight when it is remembered 
that the scene of that drama was laid in a foreign country, of 
Slavonic origin, filiated with the Teuton a-. If Prof. Caro is 
correct in his exhaustive commentary on that drama, recently 
published (1878). Shakespeare founded it upon an old Lithu- 
rian ballad, brought to England in the fourteenth century. In 
this ease he may have followed the original text. It is more 
than probable that the use of the word child, for progeny, came 
fr< >m an earlier and similar differentiation in the Keltic and 
Gothic tongues. There was an unipersonal blending of the 
generative principle inherent in all cosmologies, and especially 
those of the sun or nature myths. The scheme and nomencla- 
ture of tk_ j northern mythologies was derived from Aryan 
roots. 

Terms denoting both muliebrity and virility have been de- 
rived from those androgynous roots, and applied 1 arl >itrarily 
and interchangeably by different nations. The Teutons called 
the sun female and the moon male. Hild was a Norse term 
for both hero and maiden : from the latter came Kulla, mean- 
ing a maid and a brood, in Danish, and Hilda and Hulda, almost 
generic terms for maiden, in English. Cen, cyn, kyn. in Cymric 
are allied words of kindred meaning. Some etymologists have 
derived child (offspring) from Anglo-Saxon cenned or Danish 
kulla. the past participle of kennen, and kullden, to bring forth, 
while others trace it to the Gothic kilthei (womb) and Latin 
cyma, from the Greek, a sprout or embryo. However derived, 
early English writers use the word freely, and with some inflec- 
tions rarely used now. Wyclif uses the phrase "Eve chylded," 
&( ■.. in his translation of the Bible. 1380. Chaucer uses chylded 
and kinded for begotten — "chosen of Joseph whom he took 
to wive, unknowing him childed by miracle.'' Drayton 
writes, 

••Who having in her youth her childing felt the woe, 
Her lord's embraces she never more would know." 

Addison Child. 



30 ORIGIN AND ETYMOLOGY OF THE SURNAME CHILD. 

It may interest some to know that in the various works of 
Heraldry, in which we have made diligent and exhaustive 
search for the establishment of the line, the arms, and the 
name, of which the more prominent are Clark, DeBret, Lodge, 
and numerous editions of Burke, we have never found the 
name written with the terminal "s." For the curiously in- 
clined we append this list of names in the differing spelling, 
as culled from these works : 

L 'Enfant, Chylde, 

In/cms, Chyld, 

JUe Chylde, Child, 

Le Child, Child— Villiers, 

Hooke — Child, 

Child — Pemberton. 



Sketches and Incidents of English Families. 



Sir John Child of Sural, E. I. ; Sir Josiah Child and 
Sir Francis Child of London, Eng. 

These three men were, perhaps, the most noteworthy and 
distinguished individuals of any bearing the name of Child. 
They all raised themselves to eminence, occupied prominent 
positions, both in public and private life, and became the 
founders of opulent families in the last half of the seventeenth 
century. The first as a civic and militaiy ruler, the second as 
a merchant, political economist and philanthropist, and the lat- 
ter as a banker, goldsmith and sociologist. 

They were descendants of a family whose chief was among 
the first to adopt a surname, and probably assumed his Saxon 
title (Childe) as such, towards the end of the Saxon domination 
in England. Following the usage of the higher classes, after 
the Norman-French conquest, members of the family took the 
Latinized French form of the name (L'Bnfant) for some gener- 
ations.' Several individuals of the name were concerned in 
Henry Second's concpiest of Ireland and its subsequent govern- 
ment in the twelfth century ;' J and others seated themselves at 
Shrewsbury, Salop county, and Pool-Court, Pennock and North- 
wick, in the county of Worcester. 3 Baldwin Childe and Robert 
L'Enfant are mentioned in the Cartulary of St. Nicholas, Es- 
sex, and the latter was Provost of Shrewsbury in Henry Third's 
time, and signed Robert L'Enfant as a witness, and Le Childe 
to other documents. 4 Richard Le Child was lord of the manor 
of Northwick in 1320. and was succeeded by his two sons — 
William Le Childe in 1350, and Thomas Le Childe in 1353, 
and by his grandson, Thomas Le Childe, who was escheater for 
the county in 1428. The latter was the progenitor of William 

1 Bourne's London Merchants. 2 Lodge's Peerage of Ireland. 

3 Fuller. ' Collectanea Gfenealogica. 



32 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

Childe of Northwick, Edmund Childe of the same, and Wra. 
Child high sheriff of Worcestershire, in 1586, and William 
Child of Pensax, high sheriff in 1599, and William, lord 
of the manor of Northwick, in 1634. The sons of the lat- 
ter, Thomas of Northwick, William and John Child, one' or 
more of whom, probably the two younger, migrated to the 
neighborhood of London previous to Charles First's time. 5 
They intermarried with the Wheeler family, originally of Wilt- 
shire, but goldsmiths of " The Marygold," Temple Bar, Fleet 
street, London, in James First's time. A son, Richard Childe, 
the father of Sir John and Sir Josiah Child of this article, be- 
came a merchant of London, trading with the West Indies and 
the American colonies, and high sheriff of Bedfordshire at the 
commencement of the Ions: Parliament in 1(5-10/' He was the 
great grandson of the second high sheriff of Queen Bess' time. 
There is some diversity in statements regarding the parent- 
age of Sir John Child. Both Collins 7 and Betham 6 state that he 
was a son of John of London, gentleman, by Frances, daughter 
of Francis Goody ear of Hereford. Macaulay, 9 Bourne, and later 
writers say he was a brother of Sir Josiah, whose father was 
Richard, and as they quote from his contemporaries, White, 
Carey, Pierce, Butler, Hamilton, Papillion, and the records of 
the House of Commons, they are most likely to be right. 
Palfrey 10 speaks of " that astute London merchant, Sir Josiah 
Child," as the brother of the " factious Dr. Child, whose experi- 
ence in Massachusetts was not likely to have made his brother 
friendly to that colony." If they bore this relationship, the 
subject of this article must have been the Maj. John Child who 
defended his brother (the Doctor) so ably in the " Jonah cast 
up in London," 1647, and who subsequently sought a more 
independent field of action in the infant English colony of the , 
east. Dr. Robert Child was a distinguished graduate of Ben- 
net's College, of the University of Cambridge, and of the most 
renowned medical school of the world, that of Padua, Italy, 
from which he received his medical diploma. 11 He came to 
Boston by the advice of such men as Emanuel Downing, John 
Winthrop, Jr. and Hugh Peters, with other capitalists, to assist 

6 Bourne's Celebrated London Merchants. p Ibid. 

' Wotten's Ed. British Baronetage, London, 1741 * English Families. 

9 History of England. 10 His. New Eng. " Winthrop's His. New Eng 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. 33 

in developing the mineral wealth of the new country. lie in- 
vestigated, at that early day. the deposit of black lead in Wor- 
cester county, Mass., and of iron at Braintree and Saugus, Mass.. 
and was one of the original proprietors of the iron works at the 
latter places, the first established in America. 

He purchased of Sir Richard Vines, in 1645, the site of Bid- 
deford. Me., and was invested with the Patent, "livery and 
seisin " of the same, which William Phillips of Boston subse- 
quently acquired. ia That same year the notable Rev. Hugh 
Peters wrote Gov. John Winthrop : " Dr. Child is come : that 
honest man, who will be of exceeding great use, if the country 
know how to improve him : indeed he is very, very useful. I 
pray let us not play tricks with such men by our jealousyes." 
How necessary, but disregarded, this admonition was, subse- 
quent events proved. Having enlarged views, he held that the 
Charter guaranteed political and religious liberties, that were 
arbitrarily abridged by the Puritan rulers. His claiming the 
right of petition, and resorting to it for redress, so roused the 
ire, hatred and fear of the colonial magistrates, that they not 
only traduced, amerced, imprisoned and expelled him from the 
country, but invoked the vengeance of God upon his head, and 
did not hesitate to ascribe the accidental stumble and injury of 
a messenger canying his petition, the burning of a house, and 
the natural phenomenon of a storm at sea, to his special inter- 
vention. 14 John Cotton, in his sermon, compared his petition 
to a Jonah, and precatorily exhorted passengers by sea, in case 
they perceived God's special anger rising, to search for the hid- 
den petition, appease Him and exorcise their ship by giving it 
to the clamorous waves.' 1 lb This they afterwards alleged they 
piously affected, and " God stilled the troubled waters." They 
and the All-Seeing were imposed upon, however, by a counter- 
feit. The bona fide Jonah (petition) arrived with them safely 
in London. These incidents suggested the title to Major John 
Child's disquisition, " New England's Jonah cast up at Lon- 
don." 

Gov. Winthrop says Dr. Child's " hopes and endeavors had 
been blasted by the special providence of the Lord." He 
remained in England, but retained the friendship and became 

12 Mass. His. Collections. I3 Ibid. u Strong. 

15 Mass. His. Collections. 3C His. New Eng. 



34 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

a valued correspondent of John Winthrop, Jr., imparting to 
him the developments made in the world of science, to which 
he henceforth devoted himself.' 7 The names of these two indi- 
viduals seldom appear in the annals of New England after this, 
but that of their younger brother, Josiah, is often referred to. 
Little else is known of Maj. John Child, except that he had 
command of a regiment in Kent, 18 until he went to India, in 
1653, and was subsequently made Governor of Bombay and 
Calcutta, and commander of all the land and naval forces of 
England in the East. The title of " His Excellency " was con- 
ferred upon him by Parliament, in 16S2, 19 and King James II. 
made him a baronet as " Sir John Child of Surat," in 1684 
He was a powerful coadjutor of his brother, Sir Josiah, execut- 
ing his imperious instructions with a swift, sure hand. His 
enemies asserted that he was grasping and violent, ruling arbi- 
trarily and that he assumed sovereign powers, declaring war 
and governing by martial law upon his own responsibility. 20 
This his friends justified upon the ground that it required 
twelve months to transmit instruction from the home govern- 
ment, and while surrounded by powerful and warlike enemies, 
there were times when there was not a government armed ves- 
sel within ten thousand miles." 1 He was much blamed as all 
English Colonial Governors have ever been since, under similar 
circumstances, for becoming at war with the Great Mogul, King 
Aurengzebe, but history has shown that it was made necessary 
by the machinations of his political enemies. All recrimina- 
tions were ended by his death, in 1691, just after he had signed 
a protocol of peace. 22 Later writers say " he had the reputation 
of being a person of sobriety, wisdom, truth, and courage, es- 
teemed and beloved by all the people of all the nations of the 
East." '" He had two sisters married to members of the East 
Indian Company at Bombay. 24 He married Mary, daughter of 
John Shackston, deputy governor, and had issue — John who 
died in 1718, and Sir Caesar, who married Hester, daughter of 
John Yance of Loudon, goldsmith, by whom he had Sir Caesar, 
the father of Sir Caesar, with whom the baronetcy became 
extinct, in 1753. 25 

17 Winthrop's Letters. 1S Winthrop. 19 Macaulay. 20 Pierce Butler. 

21 Macaulay. 22 Ibid. ™ Bourne's Great London Merchants. 

24 Burke's Irish Peers. 25 Ibid. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 35 

Sir Josiah Child, born in 1630, younger brother of Governor 
John Child, and son of the London merchant, Richard Child, 
succeeded to his father's business. He became the first royal 
contractor for supplying the naval docks at Portsmouth, Eng- 
land, with ship timber from the coasts of North America. 
British archives show that government furnished his ships wit h 
convoys through the pirate-infested English Channel, and that 
they awarded him, in 1665, £25 and £33 each for masts, twenty 
and twenty -five inches in diameter." He also engaged in brew- 
ing, and at the death of Timothy Alsop, he succeeded him as 
brewer to the King. In 1666 Charles II. recommended him to 
the ''Honorable Company of London Brewers," as "having done 
faithful service in supplying the royal household and navy 
with beer." 27 But his greatest achievement was in the East. 
The wealth and importance of the ^Indies were concressive 
and concurrent with his own. Thornbury styles him the 
•"eminent political economist, president and formulator of 
the first East India Company." 28 The two cities which he 
practically founded, Calcutta and Bombay, aggregate more in- 
habitants to-day than the prefounded cities of New York and 
Boston. "Sir George Gough attributes his wealth and eleva- 
tion to having had while young the advice of the great Sir 
Josiah Child.'" But his sound judgment, liberal views, com- 
mercial enterprise and personal patronage were not unrecog- 
nized in the Western Hemisphere. William Vaughn, a wealthy 
merchant of Portsmouth, N. H., when unjustly imprisoned by 
Governor Cranfield, in writing his friend, William Weare, who 
had escaped to London says : "I send you a letter to nry 
master, Sir Josiah Child ; wait on him while he reads it, and 
attend to his directions, if God moves his heart to do aught for 
us.' ,:, ° 

Palfrey sa} r s : "Sir Josiah was not an acknowledged noncon- 
formist, but had always upheld religious liberty, and was a 
judicious counselor for the colonies;" that "he was one of 
that class of active and important traders whose stubborn char- 
acter and whose heavy purse had for fifty years prolonged the 
doubtful conflict," 31 meaning that waged between the colon \ 

-'Green's Callender State Papers. "Bourne. 

~ ( >ld London and New. -'Wotten's English Baronets. 

; "Bouton's Provincial Papers of N. H. 31 History New England. 



36 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

and the home government. He questioned the expediency of 
enacting the Navigation Act, which required all British colonies 
to confine their commerce to the ships and ports of the mother 
country, and which proved so obnoxious to the colonies ; 3 ' 2 and 
doubted whether the inconvenience it brought with it be not 
greater than the convenience ;" 33 but he upheld its principles, 
and urged that a "country was better off without, than with, a 
colony competing with home interests."' 34 In his "New Des- 
cource on Trade" he compared the colonies of the Round Heads 
in New England with those of the Cavaliers in Virginia and 
Antigua, and showed the superiority of the first, and warned 
his countrymen "that New England was the most prejudicial 
plantation to the kingdom, for the reason of its competition in 
articles produced in England, its capacity for building ships 
and raising seamen, and consequent growing naval strength, 
and because of its comparative freedom from negro slavery." 35 
Sir Josiah was the first to perceive and warn his government 
of the correlation between the stubborn bigotry, self-will and 
obstinacy of the Puritan character and the event that climaxed 
at Bunker Hill a century afterwards, in religious, commercial 
and political independence. Sir Josiah 's national sympathies 
were always with the New England colonies and unaffected by 
the narrow bigotry and petty tyrannies of their rulers ; but his 
large grasp of commercial polity made him cosmopolitan, and 
when the colonies differentiated their interests from those of 
the mother country his patriotism led him to uphold the latter. 
Thornbury 86 states that Sir Josiah was once a partner — and 
others, that he was a brother — of Sir Francis Child, founder 
of the banking firm of Child & Co., but T. G. H. Price. 37 a 
present member of that firm, who has access to their early 
books, says that both these statements are incorrect, but that 
he was closely related to him through his father, and also 
through the Wheelers. He was born May 7, 1630, 38 and must, 
with all his other enterprises, have become interested in oriental 
trade early in life. Tyndal says that "He applied himself 
chiefly to the East India trade, which, by his management, was 

32 Palfrey's Hist. New England. 33 New Discourse on Trade. 

Si Ibid. 35 Ibid. s6 Old London and New. 

37 London and Middlesex Arena?. Soe. 1875. 
3t Morant's Hist, and Antiquity of Essex. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. 37 

raised so high that it drew much envy and jealousy upon him- 
self and the company." The shares in the East India Company 
advanced during his presidency from £70 in 1664-, to £370 in 
1691. Macaulay 89 says: '-There was one great man pointed out 

on the Royal Exchange, as having by judicious or lucky pur- 
chases of stock, created in no long time, an estate of twenty 
thousand a year. This commercial grandee, who in wealth and 
in the influence that attend wealth, vied with the greatest 
nobles of his time, was Sir Josiah Child." He was by far 
the richest member of the East India Company, with one-third 
of its stock on his own hands and that of his dependents. 40 
Bourne 41 says : "From the time of Charles Second's accession Sir 
Josiah became a favorite at Court, doing his share of money 
lending to the spendthrift king, and gaining esteem by the 
honest deporment. which even the most dishonest well knew 
how to appreciate." Macaulay devotes many pages to him in 
his History of England, Vol. IV.. pp. 108 to 119, describing 
his immense wealth, superior talent, great force of character and 
potency in controlling not only his associates, but " opposing 
majorities in Parliament, kings, epieens, and the powers of the 
East." Sir Josiah had always been a whig, and won the special 
hatred of the Duke of York by his tolerant spirit and bold de- 
fence of schismatics : but on the dissolution of the Oxford Par- 
liament he separated from his old friends and formed a close 
alliance with the tories. "When the Court was all powerful 
in the state, he became all powerful at the Court." 

He distributed his wealth with a judicious prodigality. 
Charles II. accepted a present of 10,000 guineas and his brother, 
the Duke of York, a like sum of 10,000 guineas, and readily 
became a stockholder in his company. "All who could help 
or hurt at Court, ministers, mistresses, priests, were kept in 
good humor by presents of shawls and silks, bird's nests and 
attar of roses, purses of diamonds and bags of guineas."'" 
Very soon, however, all was changed, the revolution of 'S8 
brought in a whig government : the connections that had been 
his boasts were now its weakness. The king was in exile, the 
judge who had decreed his doings legitimate was a prisoner, the 
great whig merchants whom he had expelled from the direction 

39 History of England. 40 Peirce Butler's Tale, 1680 

41 Celebrated London Merchant*. i: Macaulay's Hist, of Eng. 



38 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

of the company demanded justice and vengeance. 43 But his in- 
domitable courage and persistent will quailed not. and prevailed. 
He began with William and Mary, and his enemies reported 
that he gave the leaders in Parliment 100.000 pounds sterling 
to stave off the repeal of the charter of his company. These 
political opponents accused both himself and his brother, Sir 
John. Governor of the East Indies, of the most frightful atroci- 
ties, usurpations and ponderous briberies in the administrations 
of the company's affairs. Scores of volumes of speeches, let- 
ters and essays upon the exciting subject were printed and 
read. During all this the most exalted families in the realm 
were seeking alliance with his, and William III. conferred a 
baronetcy on his son Josiah. 44 His jiowerful enemies went so 
far as to demand his dismissal forever from the direction of 
the company, and reported that the Great Mogul had made a 
like degradation of his brother, Sir John, a condition of peace. 
But before any action was taken death relieved the latter, leav- 
ing Sir Josiah to climb successfully the excelsior heights of 
his ambition alone. 

He seems to have been the best hated man of his day. 
But after the political animosities of the day had been assuaged 
by time, and all jealousy and envy put to rest by his death, 
most authorities agree in characterizing him as a man of great 
probity and enlightened views. Macaulay 45 says that his suc- 
cess in accumulating great wealth and in forwarding the inter- 
ests of the company of which he was the head, made him some- 
what haughty and imperious, and gave color to some of the 
envious charges brought against him by his enemies ; but that 
all conceded "that with all his love of monev making his main 
object was to establish the sovereignty of England in the East ; 
and to him, more than an} 7 other man is this due.'" Even at 
that early day he was assiduous in urging the Japanese ambas- 
sadors, then in London, to open the trade of their country to 
England. Tyndal says that "he had a compass of knowledge 
and apprehension unusual to men of his profession." His 
"Observations Concerning;; Trade and Interest on Monev,"' 
written at his country seat, Wanstead, during a leisure forced 
upon him by the prevalence of the great plague of 1665, con- 
tain ideas far in advance of his day and generation. At that 

43 Butler's Tale. I4 Burke. 46 History of England. 46 Hid 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 39 

time the commerce of England was in the hands of the opulen.1 
Netherlander. He gave fifteen reasons why his countrymen 
should imitate their policy, the soundness of which the course 
of trade since has proven. Only the most advanced commer- 
cial nations have }^et arrived at the truth of the ideas he evol ved 
on the use and interest of money. He wrote an Essay on the 
best practical methods of elevating the lower classes of London, 
and did much personally to ameliorate their condition. He 
was a patron and large benefactor of Christ Hospital. The ad- 
vanced thoughts which he put forth were combatted by the 
conservatives of the day, especially those on the science of 
money, in a paper war that continued long after his death. 

Evehm's 47 assertion "that there were those who remembered 
him as a merchant's apprentice, sweeping out one of the count- 
ing-houses of the city,'' was probably true, but that implied no 
menial service, for in those days every young aspirant for com- 
mercial eminence, had to begin at the bottom round and mount 
the ladder through a regular apprenticeship, however well born. 
While looking after his royal contracts for shiptimber at Ports- 
mouth, England, in early life, he met with and married Anne 
Bout 4S of that city, by whom he had two sons who died young, 
and one daughter who "nobly wedded.'' He married . second 
Mary Atwood of Hackney, by whom he had a son, baroneted 
as Sir Josiah Child b}^ William III, 1692, who died without 
issue, in 1704, and two daughters, who also "nobly wedded." 
He took for his third wife Emma, daughter of Sir Henry Ber- 
nard, and had by her Bernard Child, who died in 1698, and 
Sir Richard Child, made Baron of Newton and Viscount Cas- 
tlemaine in 1718, and Earl Tylney in 1732. Sir Richard mar- 
ried Dorothy, daughter of John Grlynne, and granddaughter of 
Francis Tylney of Rotherwick. and added Tylney to his name. 
He had Richard, first Earl Tylney, and John, second Earl Tyl- 
ney, both of whom died childless, and a daughter Emma, who 
married Sir Robert Long of Dracott, and had Sir James Tylney 
Long, who died without issue, and Catherine, who married 
"William the Worthless," Viscount Wellesley, fifth Earl of 
Mornington, who assumed the name Tylney Long. His son. 
William Richard Arthur Pole Tylney Long Wellesley. sixth 

47 Evelyn's Diary. 4a Macaulay's Hist, and Antiq. of Essex. 



40 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

Earl of Wellsley, "ended the richest merchant family of the 
seventeenth century. * ,J 

The first Sir Josiah's third wife, Emma, survived her hus- 
band twenty-six years, dying in 1725. "at which time she was 
so nearly allied to so many of the prime nobility, that eleven 
dukes and duchesses used to ask her blessing, and above fifty 
great families went into mourning for her." 50 

Soon after his first marriage Sir Josiah purchased Wanstead 
House, where eighty years before the Earl of Leicester enter 
tained most devotedly his royal mistress, Queen Elizabeth. 51 
Here the great merchant ''expended immense sums in excavating 
fish ponds and in planting whole square miles of barren land 
with walnut trees." 52 He was made a baronet by Charles II. 
in 1678, and died at Wanstead, in 1609. 

While Sir Josiah was acquiring distinction in unfolding the 
maxims and laying the foundations of modern commerce, suc- 
cessfully contending with and controlling whig cabals and tory 
cabinets, amassing wealth, with his hand on the rudder of his 
fortune ten thousand miles away, his cousin, Sir Francis Child, 
was gaining a like distinction by initiating, and opulency by 
practicing, the sj'stem of modern banking. 

Descending from the same ancient stock, his immediate pro- 
genitors seated themselves at Heddington, Wiltshire, from 
whence Francis migrated to London, in Charles First's reign. 53 
He was apprenticed to a goldsmith's firm whose business had 
been conducted by his relatives, the Wheelers, at the sign of 
"Y e Marrigold, Temple Bar, No. 1 Fleet street," from time 
immemorial. Francis 54 says "the books of Child & Co. go 
back to 1620, and refer to previous documents." He married 
his cousin Elizabeth, only daughter and heiress of his uncle, 
the second William Wheeler, 55 of the firm of which he and his 
descendants subsequently became the head. 

Previous to the introduction and manufacture of fictile wares 
in Europe, in the eighteenth century, the lower classes used 
wooden, the middle pewter, and the higher classes and nobility 
used services of gold and silver ; articles of the latter for the 

49 Bourne's Celebrated London Merchants. 60 Ibid. 

bl Morant's Hist, and Antiq. of Essex. i2 Macaulay. 

53 Price's London and Middlesex Archaeological Society, 187. 

M History of Bank of England. 5& Evelyn's Diary. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 41 

toilet and table, costing pounds where the same in porcelain 
cost shillings now. This made the goldsmith's craft an import- 
ant and lucrative one. Formerly the nobility and wealthy 
classes kept their money and valuables in " cash boxes," in 
their castles and domiciles, but as their wealth increased and 
their armed retainers decreased, this became unsafe. They 
then used the mint in the Tower of London as a safe deposit. 
But Charles I. perfidious^ seized and confiscated all those de- 
posits. They then made the rich goldsmiths their custodians. 
This led the latter to keeping " running cashes" and to making 
interest bearing loans to tradespeople, and others, on pawns 
or pledges, thus adding incipient banking to their craft. Child 
& Co. are inserted in the little London Directory for 1677, as 
" goldsmiths keeping running cashes.'' They were the first to 
separate the two callings. Francis 56 states " that the celeb- 
rity of the first banking-house belongs by common consent to 
Mr. Francis Child." There is an account on their ledgers 
opened in 1669, before they divorced the two vocations, under 
the head of "Pawns." changed a few years later to "P." which 
has been brought forward from ledger to ledger under this title 
as their collateral loan account, for two hundred and ten years. 
The record of this family of bankers is so interwoven, warp 
and woof, with that of Temple Bar, the Marygold and their 
environs, that any narrative of either, without frequent refer- 
ence to the others would be perfunctory indeed. Many of 
their customers addressed their cheques to " Mr. Alderman 
Child and partner, at y e Marygold, next door to Temple Bar ; '» 
sometimes " next door to the Devil Taverne." When the heads 
of the firm were lord mayors of London, the Earl of Oxford 
addressed his cheques li To the Worshipful the Lord Mayor 
& Co., at Temple Bar." Like most of the distinctive appella- 
tions of the goldsmiths of London, the sign of the Marygold 
originated in that of a tavern. It was the usage for succeeding 
occupants to retain the sign, without reference to the vocation. 
" Messrs. Child's banking house was in King James First's 
reign, a public ordinary, the sign being the Marygold." 58 When 
it came into the occupation of the goldsmiths is not definitely 
known, but probably about 1620, as the last mention of it as 
a public house was on St. Thomas' day, December 21, 1619, 

56 History Bank of England. r,T Price. M Beaufoy's Tokens. 

D 



42 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

when it was presented to the ward-mote " for disturbing its next 
neighbors late in the nights, from time to time, by ill disor- 
ders." 6S The goldsmiths held it on a ground rent. Sir Fran- 
cis Child put the present front to the Marygold in 1666, the 
year of the great fire of London, although the conflagration did 
not reach it. An old document, still extant, shows that Sir 
Francis renewed his lease of the Marygold from the " Feast 
of St. Michael the archangel, 1707, and the Sugar Loaf and 
Green Lettuce, 1714, at a yearly rental of £60 for sixty-one 
years." The Sugar Loaf was an old London tavern, directly 
in the rear of the Marygold. Sir Francis repaired it in 1707 and 
added it to his banking premises. He subsequently purchased 
for £2,800 the famous tavern popularly called the " Old Devil " 
from its sign. " St. Dunstan pulling the Devil's nose," which 
adjoined, and erected a block of houses now known as " Child's 
Place." 6 " The "Old Devil" was the favorite resort of Ben Jonson, 
where he lorded it over his confreres that were " sealed of the 
tribe of Ben." Here he sometimes met Shakespeare. He wrote 
"Drink to me with thine eyes," &c, at this famous resort. 
Child & Co. have with characteristic conservativeness preserved 
many very interesting relics of these three historical houses. 
They have the original sign of the Marygold and Sun, made 
of oak, stained green, with gilt border, with the motto u Ainsi 
mon ame" now put up over the door between the front and 
back office, and retain it on the water-mark of their cheques, &c. 
The old passageways of the Sugar Loaf, with their wooden 
hat pegs, the old dining rooms, kitchens and larders, with their 
wooden meat hooks, are preserved as they were two and three 
centuries ago. In one of the rooms over the old kitchen may 
be seen the bust of Apollo, and the tablet on which the lines 
of welcome to the Apollo Eoom, by Ben Jonson, are engraved 
in gold letters. 01 Those were on the chimney piece of the great 
room. When Sir Christopher Wren rebuilt Temple Bar, in 
1 666, Child & Co. rented the chambers over the arcade adjoin- 
ing their premises, of the city of London, at a yearly rental of 
£20, which they used as a sort of muniment room for the safe 
keeping of their old papers and books of accounts, until the 
excavations for the foundations of the new Inner Courts of 
Law, in 1875, caused Temple Bar to settle so much that, in 
58 Beaufoy. m Price. 61 See Tatler, No. 79. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISB FAMILIES. 43 

1877. the city gave them notice to vacate on "next midsum- 
mer's day :' VJ what a notice to give and receive ; a n< >t ice to quil 
forever premises filled with the familiar associations and the 
daily recordsof one's ancestors for centuries ! The widening of 
Fleet street demanded for public convenience the demolition of 
the time-honored banking house, and the erection of another, 
one door east covering the site of Child's place, anciently that 
of the "Old Devil." to which the firm moved on next bank 
holiday, April 15, 1879. 63 They are still on ancestral ground. 
Among the main- interesting pre-Elizabethan relics found in 
excavating the foundations of Sugar Loaf and the Old Devil 
taverns, in 1878, the most curious is an ancient flagon, filled 
with a ruby wine, intact, the glass of which has been oxidized 
into iridescent colors by contact with the earth for centuries. 

During a larger part of their tenancy the heads or quarters 
of those who suffered for political offences were exposed 
upon Temple Bar. directly opposite the windows of the bank. 
It sometimes happened that the bankers were obliged to look 
daily upon the ghastly features of a former friend and client for 
long years after the procurator of the crown had covered in to the 
public treasury the forfeited balances of their accounts. Dick- 
ens 64 characteristically described Child & Co. under the pseu- 
donym of Tellson & Co., as they were in the days of the French 
revolution. Up to that time crimes against propertv, theft. 
forger}-, false coining, the unauthorized opening of a letter, 
were punished by death. He says "that their bank had taken 
so many lives in its day, that if the heads laid low by it had 
been ranged on Temple Bar, they would probably have ex- 
cluded what little light the ground floor had in a rather signifi- 
cant manner. 7 ' He hardly exaggerates when he saj-s : " The 
house was founded a hundred and fifty years previously," or 
caricatures in saying, "their bank by Temple Bar was an old- 
fashioned place, even in the year one thousand seven hundred 
and eighty. It was very small, very dark, very ugly, very in- 
commodious. It was an old-fashioned place, moreover in the 
moral attribute that the partners in the house were proud of 
smallness, proud of its darkness, proud of its ugliness, proud 
of its incommodiousness. They were even boastful of its emi- 

62 London Times, February 22, 1877. 

63 London Telegraph, January 28, 1879. Ci Tales of Two Cities. 



44 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

nence in those particulars, and were fired by an express con- 
viction that if it were less objectionable, it would be less re- 
spectable. This was no passive belief, but an active weapon 
which they flashed at more convenient places of business. 
Tellson's (they said) wanted no elbow-room, Tellson's wanted 
no light, Tellson's wanted no embellishment. JSToakes and Co.'s 
might, or Snooks Bros, might ; but Tellson's, thank Heaven ! — 

" Any one of these partners would have disinherited his son 
on the question of rebuilding Tellson's. In this respect the 
house was much on a par with the Country ; which did very 
often disinherit its sons for suggesting improvements in laws 
and customs that had long been highly objectionable, but were 
only the more respectable. 

" Thus it had come to pass, that Tellson's was the triumphant 
perfection of inconvenience. After bursting open a door of 
idiotic obstinacy with a weak rattle in its throat, you fell into 
Tellson's down two steps, and came to your senses in a miser- 
able little shop, with two little counters, where the oldest of 
men made your check shake as if the wind rustled it, while 
they examined the signature by the dingiest of windows, which 
were always under a shower-bath of mud from Fleet street, 
and which were made the dingier by their own iron bars proper, 
and the heavy shadow of Temple Bar. If your business neces- 
sitated your seeing 'the House,' you were put into a species 
of Condemned Hold at the back, where you meditated on a 
misspent life, until the House came with its hands in its pock- 
ets, and you could hardly blink at it in the dismal twilight. 
Your money came out of, or went into, wormy old wooden 
drawers, particles of which flew up your nose and down your 
throat when they were opened and shut. Your bank notes 
had a musty odor, as if they were fast decomposing into rags 
again. Your plate was stowed away among the neighboring 
cesspools, and evil communications corrupted its good polish 
in a day or two. Your deeds got into extemporized strong 
rooms made of kitchens and sculleries, and fretted all the fat 
out of their parchments into the banking house air. Your 
lighter boxes of family papers went up stairs into a Barmecide 
room, that always had a great dining table in it and never had 
a dinner, and where, even in the year one thousand seven hun- 
dred and eighty, the first letters written to you by your old 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 45 

love, or by your little children, were but newly released from 
the horror of being ogled through the windows, by the heads 
exposed on Temple Bar with an insensate brutality and ferocity 
worthy of Abyssinia or Ashantee. 

" Cramped in all kinds of dim cupboards and hatches a1 
Tellson's. the oldest of men carried on the business gravely. 
When they took a young man into Tellson's London House 
they hid him somewhere till lie was old. They kept him in a 
dark place, like a cheese, until he had the full Tellson flavor 
and blue-mould upon him. Then only was he permitted to 
be seen, spectacularly poring over large books, and casting his 
breeches and gaiters into the general weight of the establish- 
ment" 

Child k Co. had a branch house in Paris, with the accounts 
of the noblesse which were transferred to London during the 
revolution, together w T ith their valuables, to be used to eke out 
a miserable existence, or to to be settled sans compte rendu par 
Les Etats executifs, the guillotine. 

The Marvgold became the headquarters of the Emegres during 
the reign of terror, and its secret couriers were constantly pass- 
ing between the two cities. So great was the crowd anxious to 
get the latest news from Paris, that bulletins were posted in its 
windows giving the names of the daily victims of the guillo- 
tine. 

The banking firm retain many old time usages, probably in- 
herited from their ancestors, the goldsmiths. They call their 
front office " the shop," and that in the rear, where the ledgers 
are kept, " the counting house," where they " cast up the shop " 
once a year. Use cheques written (never printed) on paper bear- 
ing their trade-mark, the Marvgold, in its water mark. Thev 
adhere to the good old fashioned rule now too little practiced, 
of advancing their clerks by seniority and merit, and eventu- 
ally admitting them as partners. 

The firm has usually consisted of a head and five or six act- 
ive partners, restricted, as a rule, to one of a family at a time, 
but open to hereditary succession, other tilings being equal. A 
member of the Child family has always succeeded to the first 
position, and the gaps made by time among other partners have 
been filled from the well seasoned stock of head clerks, selected 
in the sapling and carefully bred in the soil favorable to the 



46 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

best growth. Tins selection and survival of the fittest, together 
'with inherited conservativeness, seems to have been favorable 
to longevity. Eight head partners of four generations, presided 
from 1063 to 1S67. The last was of the fourth from the first 
Sir Francis Child, while he was of the sixth generation from 
his contemporary, VereFane, third Earl of Westmoreland, who 
opened an account with their bank in 1678. During these two 
centuries there were about fifty active partners, with an average 
tenure of about thirty years, and nearly as many more as clerks. 
There were three John Wormalds, father, son and grandson, 
partners in the firm collectively eighty-nine years, and clerks 
ninety -four years. The last died in 1874, having been taken 
ill on the sixtieth anniversary of the day he began his appren- 
ticeship. Ealph and Greorge Addison averaged about the same 
time as partners, and Robert Dent was a partner forty- three 
years. 

The exceptional prosperity and continuity of this banking- 
firm is largely due to the wisdom and forethought with which 
the first Sir Francis Child laid its broad foundations. The con- 
sensus that he evolved and the remarkable clauses that he in- 
serted in his will, together with their innate conservativeness, 
have enabled his descendants to conduct a large aud increasing 
business successfully through the perturbations of two centuries 
and more. This is probably an unique instance of a vocation 
having descended from one generation to the next, without a 
consanguinal break, in the same building, for more than two 
hundred years ! 

" Within that time how many an empire hoar 
And young republic flushed with wealth and war 
Alike hath changed the ermine for the shroud." 

The first Sir Francis Child was a careful, shrewd man of 
affairs, conservative in many things, but the originator of many 
of the maxims and forms of modern banking. That he was a 
man of little political or religious bias, is shown by his popu- 
larity with men differing widely on these subjects. His old 
ledgers show that he had the accounts of Oliver Cromwell, 
Charles II, his queen, his mother, his ministers, his mistresses, 
his natural sons, the Dukes of Richmond and Monmouth, his 
brother, James II., William and Mary, and the leading men of 
their several reigns. The Middlesex and London Arclueologi- 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 47 

< al Society published a list, in 1875, of some scores of noblemen 
and leading men who opened accounts with his bank previous 
to 1700, whose descendants are still keeping their bank accounts 
there. Among the many valuable autographs and relics pre- 
served in the bank is a cheque drawn by the Duke of Bolton 
to the order of. and endorsed by the notorious Titus Oats; our 

her 

signed "Ellen X Gwin/'a bond signed by four dukes and earls 

mark 

agreeing to pay her indebtedness to the firm, by overdrawing 
her account £0.000, after deducting her plate, 14,400 ounces 
turned in; Dr. Hurrell's receipt ''in full for all remedies and 
medicines delivered to Miss Ellen Gwin, deceased," dated 1699, 
twelve years after her exit: a cheque for £200, payable " upon 
producing and delivering to them, the King's pardon to James 
Hooper for high treason;" an autograph note of the Duke of 
Leeds, dated 1(594, praying "his very good friend, Sir Francis 
Child, goldsmith, neare Temple Bar," "to subscribe foure thou- 
sand pounds for meeto the stock of the Bank of England," then 
forming; a school receipt dated 1085, for £2.18.5 tuition for 
his sons Robert and John at a private school, which small sum 
includes their books, "a Cato and Corderius, a Horace, a Livy> 
a Cornelius Nepos, and a French master;" another for £2.5.10 
for John, including the above and "dinners for ten weeks less 
five holidays." His son James' bill for 1702, including "books, 
light, fire, coach hire, pocket money, gloves, mending clothes, 
cutting hair, tuition, pole money, and full board for six months" 
was £12.2.0; another, including all the above and "the board 
and expenses of a private tutor, writing, French and dancing 
masters, powder, oyl and church dues," £23.16.8. 

There is a spirited caricature by Hogarth, extant, of the Duch- 
ess of Marlboro' as she appeared at the bank, Temple Bar, fol- 
lowed by porters carrying the most remarkable articles of silver 
and gold plate which she had hastily collected, on hearing of a 
threatened run on Child's bank, to tide them over. During a 
panic in 10n'3, Pepys 66 says: "I cannot have my two hundred 
pieces of gold again for silver, all being bought up last night 
that were to be had, and sold for twenty-four and twenty-five 
shillings, so I must keep my silver by me." Forgetting that 
similar acts had brought the " grey crowned head" of his father 

e * Pepys' Diary. 



48 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

to the block, Charles II. treacherously closed the exchequer in 
1672, entailing ruin, bankruptcy and want upon all classes, es- 
pecially the goldsmiths, who had large amounts deposited there, 
and among them Alderman Backwell, of " the Grasshopper," 
Lombard street, to whom the Crown owed £296,000. After 
great distress, the King issued six per cent, annuity bonds to 
Backwell and others, but repudiated them before any interest 
was paid, and Backwell died in prison. After many years, 
William III. reinstated those debts which Charles' prodigality 
had caused, and this was the beginning of the present public 
debt of England. A late number of the British Review naively 
remarks, that "Barbara Villiers was the foundation of this public 
debt." 

After Alde'rman Backwell's failure, his son married a daugh- 
ter of Sir Francis Child, and became a partner in that bank, 
taking his books and valuable accounts with him, many of 
which are still on their books. " Sir Francis acted as messen- 
ger and banker of the lottery of Prince Rupert's jewels, valued 
at £20,000, at which the King himself took part, counting out 
the tickets among the lords and ladies.'' There was much 
jealousy and rivalry between Child & Co. and the Bank of Eng- 
land. Previous to the establishment of the latter, the former 
had found it popular and lucrative to issue notes of circulation, 
which privilege the bank's charter took from them, within sixty- 
five miles of London. They then put their certificates of de- 
posit into circulation, which soon commanded a premium, while 
the notes of the bank were at a discount. Stung by this, and 
to retaliate, the bank secretly bought up a large amount of their 
certificates, hoping to break Child & Co. by presenting them all 
at once. Hearing of this, the latter applied to their sure friend, 
the Duchess of Marlboro', who loaned them £700,000 in a 
single cheque on the Bank of England. .Holding this until the 
certificates were presented, a preconcerted signal caused a clerk 
to draw the bills for it, and return with them long before the 
cool headed banker had summed up the total of the certificates, 
when he paid them off with the bills. He was able to buy 
them the next day (to pay the Duchess back), at a large dis- 
count." Some time after this, Sir Francis attempted to break 
the bank, by refusing publicly to receive its notes ; not succeed- 

" London Gazette, Dec. 3, 1683. 67 Francis' Hist. Bank of England. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 49 

ing in this, he essayed to effect it by their own device, quietly 
collecting £100,000 of their bills and demanding their redemp 
tion ; they tided over this by paying out only sixpences, mis- 
counting, and keeping their counters thronged by their own 
servants, who returned the silver privately to the bank after 
drawing it. 

Sir Francis was arraigned in parliament, of which he was 
then a member, for injuring the government and helping its 
enemies, by trying to break the Bank of England. 08 He curried 
it off with a high hand, saying every " tub must stand on its own 
bottom," or fall. This rivalry and warfare was kept up for half 
a century, and long after the first and second Sir Francis were 
dead. In the year (1745) that the Stewarts made their last, 
most brilliant, and almost successful attempt to recover the 
crown of their ancestor, under the guidance of the youthful and 
comely Charles Edward, the notes of the Bank of England were 
at a fearful discount. "The directors, alarmed at the great de- 
preciation of their paper, and attributing it to the high estima- 
tion in which the house of Child & Co. still remained, attempt- 
ed, by very unfair artifices, to ruin their reputation. 69 But like 
that of the Pretender, the assault ended in strengthening the 
assailed. Smiles 711 says that when the Duke of Bridgewater be- 
came embarrassed in the construction of his great canal, in 1760, 
"taking the road to' the city on horseback, attended only by his 
groom, to try what could be done with his London bankers, 
Child & Co., Temple Bar, then the principal banking house in 
the metropolis, as it is the oldest, and where most of the aristo- 
cratic families kept their accounts." He effected a loan on hy- 
pothecating the revenues of the canal, that enabled him to com- 
plete it. 

The first Sir Francis Child was a man of great executive 
ability, public spirit, and benevolence. Besides conducting his 
business through four rather panicy reigns, with much sagacity 
and success, discounting revolutions, holding the "sinews" and 
patronage of whig or tory alike, he held respectively the offices 
of alderman, high sheriff, colonel of the honorable artillery 
company, 71 and lord mayor of London. 72 He represented the 
city in Queen Anne's first parliament, 73 and was president and 

68 Francis' Hist, of Bank of England. ™ Ibid. 

70 Lives of the Engineers. 71 Highmore. 72 I. B. Firth. 

78 Falkner's Hist. Falkner, &e. 



50 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

a large benefactor of Christ's Hospital, rebuilding the ward over 
the east cloisters, 74 which bears a marble tablet inscribed "Anno. 
1705. This ward was rebuilt at the sole charge of Sir Francis 
Child, Knt, some time lord mayor, and now president of this 
house." Full length portraits of Sir Francis, and his son Sir 
Francis, who was also president of the institution and lord 
mayor of London, adorn the centre of the great hall, opposite 
to the fine portrait of its founder, Edward VI. 7(i 

Sir Francis purchased the magnificent estate, Osterly House, 
in 1711, but died, two years later, without occupying it, in a 
mansion which he built, called East End House. The "Beau- 
ties of England and Wales" has a fine view of Osterly House. 
Sir Francis had three brothers : Daniel, who lived with him, ar 
Parson's Green ; Edward, who lived at Burghley, and John, at 
Devizes, and twelve sons and three daughters. Sir Robert, Sir 
Francis and Sir Samuel succeeded their father puri-passu as heads 
of the banking house. Stephen Child founded a separate bank- 
ing house previous to 1713, under the name of Stephen Child & 
Co., which has been doing business ever since at the "Crown," 
near Pope's Head Alley, under varying titles, but as Willis, 
Percival & Co. for several generations, and has had dealings and 
an open account with Child & Co. for one hundred and sixty-six 
years, as shown by their books. 77 John was a clerk in his fath- 
er's bank, where the following undertaker's bill is still preserved: 
" For the burial of John Child of the Marygold, Esq., in the 
vault of the Temple Church, February, 1702," total, £6.10.00 
of which the principal items are " for candles for the church, 
£0.2.6;" "for the six bearers in gowns, £2.0.0." George was 
in holy orders ; Thomas a merchant ; James and William died 
early, and were buried in Falham churchyard, with their father 
and sister Martha, who married A. Collins ; Jane died young, 
and Elizabeth married Tyrringham Backwell, who became a 
partner in Child's bank, as did his two sons, Barnaby and William ; 
what became of Leonard and the other two sons, is not known. 
The eldest son, Robert, as has been said, succeeded his father 
as head of the firm ; he was also alderman, and colonel of the 
honorable artillery company, and was one of the four citizens 
knighted by George I. on his accession, in 1714, in compliment 

74 Trollop's Hist. Christ's Hospital. 75 Ibid. 

. 7B Allen's Hist, of London. 77 Price. 



SKETCHES AND [NCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES, 51 

to the city of London, 7 " yet he paid, according to his cash hook 
of 25th September, "£86.11.6 for the honor of knighthood." 
He was the first of the family who resided at Osterly, where he 
died without issue, in 1721, and where his portrait, by Michael 
Dahl, can he seen. His next brother, Francis, alderman 1721, 
high sheriff 1722, lord mayor and baronet 1732. president 
Christ Hospital, or " blue coat school"' 1727-1740; member of 
parliament for the city, and director in the East India Company, 
lived at Osterly, to which he added Northall, in 1726, at a cost 
of £19.501. and died there, in 1710. Full length portraits of 
himself and his father, both in the robes of lord mayor, may be 
seen there. 79 

He was succeeded as head of the bank and at Osterley by 
his younger brother, Sir Samuel Child, baronet and member 
of parliament. He lived in Lincoln's Inn Field, and married 
Miss Agatha Edgar, by whom he had two sons, Francis and 
Robert, and a daughter. There is a beautiful group of these 
three children at Osterley, by Dandridge, and also of Sir Sam- 
uel and Lady Child, by I. Vanderbank. Sir Samuel was suc- 
ceeded as head of the firm at his death, in 1752, by his widow, 
Mrs. Agatha Child, until her decease in 1763, when her eldest 
son, Francis, took her place. He, however, died the same year, 
leaving two of his partners, Devon and Lovelace, £20,000 each, 
and £20 each to their seven clerks for mourning. It is remark- 
able that, under the good old rule of the house, all these seven 
clerks became partners in the firm within the next twenty-seven 
years, the youngest reaching that goal in 1790. Francis Child 
was a man of cultivated taste and refined discrimination. He 
expended large sums in rebuilding Osterley House in 1760, 80 
preserving the ancient ground plan generally, but covering the 
square court in front by a spacious portico, and changing Oster- 
ley chapel, where the beautiful Anne Waller was married to 
Sir Philip Harcourt, in 1661, into the present servants' hall. 81 
He purchased a fine painting, by Rubens, in Holland; which 
ornaments the grand staircase; subject, "The Apotheosis of 
William I, Prince of Orange." 

Osterley Manor, according to Lyson, was a fine old place in 
Edward First's reign, in the thirteenth century. Having be- 



78 



Allen's Hist, of London. 70 Lyson. 

Lyson's Environs of London. M Lyson. 



52 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

longed to the convents of Sheen and of Sion, it reverted to the 
Crown on the suppression of the monasteries, and was granted 
successively to the Marquis of Exeter and the Duke of Somer- 
set, and was forfeited by both on their attainders. 62 Coming into 
the possession of Sir Thomas Gresham, the founder of the Roval 
Exchange, he enclosed the park, rebuilt the Manor House, and 
entertained Queen Elizabeth there in 157S most sumptuously. 
The Queen having remarked that the great court " would look 
handsomer if divided by a wall in the centre," Sir Thomas, when 
the Queen retired for the night, procured workmen from Lon- 
don and had the wall built before she rose in the morning:. 83 
Result, a pun, that it was " no wonder that a man who could 
build a 'Change could change a building.'" b4 Like unto " rain 
water sherry," one wonders how such a weak pun could have 
been preserved so long. 

Osterley House stands in the centre of a fine park of three 
hundred and fifty acres. It is 140 by 117 feet. " The interior, 
which is fitted up with great taste and magnificence, was fin- 
ished b} r Robert Child, who succeeded to his brother Francis' 
estates in 1763." The most remarkable of the rooms are a 
noble gallery, 130 feet in height, (sic) containing a good collec- 
tion of pictures by the old masters, and some valuable portraits. 
" The state bedroom, very magnificently furnished, and a din- 
ing room hung with beautiful tapestry, procured at a great ex- 
pense from the Gobelins manufactory in 1775.'" - 6 " The library 
contains a large and most valuable collection of books, of which 
there is a printed catalogue, drawn up by Dr. Morell, in 1771." 

Robert Child succeeded his brother as head of the firm, and 
amassed the largest private fortune of the eighteenth century. 
He sold his house in Lincoln's Inn Field, and purchased tha^ 
of the Duke of Manchester, in Berkley square, in 1767, for 
£10,500. This is still the town residence of the family. With 
all his magnificent expenditures, he was a close, penurious man. 
He once asked Sheridan, who lived neighbor at Osterley, to 
write him a sermon. He took for his text, " A Rich Man," 
and described his neighbor's (the banker's) characteristic foibles 
so accurately, that it was patent to every one whom the subject 
of the discourse was intended for. He married Sarah, daughter 

8! Lyson. S3 Wolton's English Baronets. 84 Ibid. 

85 Lyson. 6S Ibid. 



SKETCHES AXD INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 53 

of Gilbert and Mary (Craddock) Iodroll, of Ankerwicke Pri- 
ory." (This Priory, on the banks of the Thames, was the 
refuge of King John the night before he was compelled to sign 
Magna-Charta of Runnymede.) Their only child, Sarah Anne, 
eloped from her father's house in Berkley square on the night 
of the 17th January, 1782, with John Fane, tenth Earl of 
Westmoreland, causing a great sensation at the time. Her 
father took post-chaise and pressed the lovers so closely in 
Northamptonshire, " that the Earl was obliged to stand up in his 
carriage and shoot the leading horse of the pursuers, capsizing 
the vehicle, thereby causing a delay that enabled the lovers to 
reach Gretna Green and be married by the blacksmith before 
the father arrived." 88 The incensed father never forgave his 
daughter, but disinherited her and debarred her right of succes- 
sion to the firm, bequeathing that valuable right and his im- 
mense estates to her eldest daughter. He died within the year, 
when his widow, Mrs. Sarah Child, succeeded him as head of 
the firm. She subsequently married Lord Ducie, who signed 
the balance sheet with her on the "casting up of the shop," in 
1791, and receipted for her at her death, in 1793, from which 
time to the majority of her granddaughter, Lady Sophia Child 
Fane, in 1806, the headship of the firm was held in abeyance 
for the first time. 

Lady Ducie was an accomplished artist, and many of her 
paintings are to be found at Osterley, where she continued to 
live. There are to be seen there several paintings of her, and a 
joint one of her as Lady Ducie and her daughter, the Countess 
of Westmoreland ; and also several of Robert Child ; one by 
Romney, which is considered his best work. He is commem- 
orated by a fine monument of white marble in the south chan- 
cel of Heston Church, near Osterley, designed by Adams, archi- 
tect. 

The Earl of Westmoreland was of the fifth generation from 
Vere Fane 3d Earl, who opened an account with his contempo- 
rary, the first Sir Francis, in 1678, which account he still kept 
open. He was dining with Robert Child at the bank, Temple 
Bar, a few days before the elopement, when he asked the banker 
confidentially what he would do " if he was in love with a girl, 

w Lyson's Beauties of Buckinghamshire. 
** London Gazette, July, 1782. 



54 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

whose parents, he had good reason for believing, would not 
consent to the marriage," and was answered, " run away with 
her, of course," the banker little thinking that " the girl" was 
his own daughter. She had one son, John, the eleventh Earl, 
who married Priscilla Ann Wellesley, neice of the great Duke 
of Wellington, and sister of the fifth Earl of Mornington, who 
married Catherine, daughter of Sir James Tylney Long, and 
great granddaughter of Sir Josiah Child/ 9 and three daughters, 
the second of whom, married Earl Morey, and for her second 
husband Sir Arthur Paget; and the third married the Earl 
of Bessborough. The eldest daughter, Lady Sophia Child Fane, 
became the head of the firm of Child & Co. at her majority, 
March, 4, 1806. When they "cast up the shop," as they still 
term it, the head of the firm visits their counting house, exam- 
ines and signs the " balance sheet," concurrently with all the 
partners, and afterwards dines with them in the old Sugar Loaf 
dining room, up one flight of stairs, at the Marygold. 

On the occasion of Lady Sophia's assuming her hereditary 
position at the head of the table and firm, a full-length portrait 
of her, by Sir Thomas Laurence, was placed over the Eliza- 
bethan chimney piece of the old dining room, where it has since 
remained, and the old-time day of reckoning changed from 
October 3d to March 4th, in honor of her birthday. This slip 
of Gretna Green proved of thoroughbred tissue. She presided 
longest of any of her blood — sixty-one years. She became a 
reigning beauty of the Court of George IV., "succeeded by 
bequest to the immense fortune of her grandfather, Robert 
Child, and married George Villiers, fifth Earl of Jersey, who 
was twice lord chamberlain of George IV., and twice master of 
horse to Victoria,' 1 He was enabled, bjr act of parliament, to 
assume the additional arms and surname of Child, in 1812. 
He died in 1859. 90 Issue: George Augustus Frederick Child- 
Villiers, sixth Earl of Jersey ; Augustus John, who married a 
daughter of Viscount Keith ; F. W. Child- Villiers, who married 
a sister of the Earl of Athlone ; Francis and three daughters, 
one of whom married Prince Esterhazy. George, sixth Earl, 
married a daughter of the late Sir EobertPeel, and predeceased 
his mother, who was succeeded as head of the firm, at her death 
in 1S67, by his eldest son, Victor Albert George Villiers-Child, 
89 Burke's Peerage. 80 Burke's Peerage. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE BNGLISB FAMILIES. 00 

seventh Earl of Jersey, who married a daughter of Lord Leigh, 
of Stone Leigh, and has a son, Henry George Child-Yilliers, 
born 1S73, who is heir-apparent to Ids father's position as head 
of the family and Child & Co.'s bank. The present Karl was 
born in 1845, educated at Eton and Oxford : is Baron IIoo and 
Viscount Grandisou, Magistrate for Oxen. Lord of Middleton 
Park, Bicester, ami Osterley Park, Hounslow, where he has 
country seats, and resides in Berkley square, city. He is a 
direct descendant of several noble families, who opened accounts 
with his great ancestor, Sir Francis Child, previous to 1700, 
and of Edward Yilliers, Governor of Ireland, father of the 
beautiful Barbai-a Yilliers, mistress of Charles II, Duchess of 
Cleveland, Countess of Castlemaine, who kept an account with 
Child & Co., and whose autograph cheque that firm still hold, 
beginning, "Pray pave Fifty Ginneys to berer,*' dated 1689, 
and of the lineage of the Earls of Bridgewater, Derby, Cumber- 
land, descendants of the Duke of Suft'old, who married Mary, 
sister of Henry VIII., through whom he has the right to quar- 
ter the royal arms. 

If any apology is due for the prominence given to the com- 
mercial relations of the family herein imperfectly sketched, it 
may be found in the fact that it was eminently a commercial 
family : that its members were potent factors in the establish- 
ment of an important commercial colony, now grown to be a 
great political empire, with hundreds of millions of subjects, 
and the founders and are the managers of the first and now the 
oldest bank among English-speaking people ; that these rela- 
tions have been the prime source of wealth and eminence, and 
are so interwoven with its history that if less accentuated this 
article would have been more imperfect. 

Note. — The writer of the above sketch is indebted for many 
of the incidents of the family and bank to an article thereon 
written by a present member of the firm of Child & Co.. V. 
Hilton Price, and published in the proceedings of the London 
and Middlesex Archaeological Society, for 1875. 

Addison Child. 



56 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

Some fragmentary items of various persons of the name are 
herewith given. One is a metrical account of an affaire de ceour, 
published some years ago in England, which I found in the 
".Book of Days." In the same book was found the item in re- 
gard to Lady Child. These are of an amusing character. 

In 1750, Charles Baldwin married a daughter of Sir William 
Lacon Childe, and assumed the name and arms of Childe. 
Their present representative is William Lacon Childe, of Shrop- 
shire. Symonds' Diary says that, "Charles I. encamped at 
Childley, an ancient house near Oxford ; also at Childton, near 
Hungerford, in 1644, and in 1645 at Child's, Wickham, Glos'- 
tershire. 

John Child was in the secret service of Charles II. and 
James II., and was sent by the latter to St. Christopher's as 
chaplain, in 1685. He may have been the son of Sir Francis 
Child of London, who died in L703. 

Rowland Davis speaks of William of Orange lodging at 
Child's house at Cullen, near Tipperary, Ireland, in 1690. 

From the Book of Days we quote: "Dr. Plott in his Nat- 
ural History of Shropshire, 1686, gives many instances of cen- 
tenarians of his time." After citing some of these, he says: 
"This is much the same that Zuingerus reports of a noble 
matron of the family of Dol burger, the archbishop of Mentz, 
who could thus speak to her daughter : 

"(1) Mater ait (2) natar, Die (3) natar, Filia, (4) natam 
Ut moveat, (5) natar flang ere (6) fitiotam!" 

That is, the " Mother said to her daughter, daughter, bid 
thy daughter tell her daughter that her daughter's daughter 
cries ! " He adduces as proof how far this case is from being 
difficult of belief, that a Lady Child of Shropshire, being mar- 
ried at twelve, her first child was born before she was complete 
thirteen ; this being repeated in the second generation, Lady 
Child found herself a grandmother at twenty-seven. At the 
same rate she might have been a beldam*' at sixty-six, and had 
she reached one hundred and twenty, as has been done by 
others, it was possible that nine generations might have ex- 
isted together." It will be found that Lady Child of Shrop- 
shire, is not the only matron in the Child family at the age of 

92 One who sees the sixth generation. 



SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 57 

twelve, as Benjamin Child, son of the emigrant of that name, 
married Grace Morris when she was only twelve. 1 

In this same Book of Days we find an extract from "The 
Berkshire Lady's Garland:" k - March 29th, 1679, is the date of 
a baronetcy conferred on a Berkshire gentleman, William Ken- 
rick of Whitley, which, however, expired with the second gen- 
eration, about the close of the century. The second baronet left 
his property -to an only daughter, who is understood to have 
soon after disposed of herself in marriage, in a very extraordi- 
nary manner. Tradition and a contemporary broadside ballad 
concur in representing this young gentlewoman as paid court to 
by many, but refusing all, and keeping herself disengaged, until 
attending a wedding at Beading, she met a young and hand- 
some, but poor, attorney, named Benjamin Child, with whom 
she fell violently in love on the spot. For some days she rea- 
soned with herself on the subject, trying to shake herself free 
of this sudden passion, but all in vain. Then feeling that 
something must be done, but unable, from confusion of mind, 
to devise a proper course, she took the extraordinary course of 
sending the yonng man a letter, demanding satisfaction for in- 
juries she alleged he had inflicted on her, and appointing time 
and place for a hostile meeting. Mr. Child was much surprised, 
and quite at a loss to conceive who the challenger could be. 
By the advice of a friend, however, he resolved to attend. 
The meeting may be described in the words of the ballad : 

•' Early on a summer's morning, 
When bright Phoebus was adorning 

Every bower with his beams, 
The fair lady came, it seems. 

At the bottom of a mountain, 
Near a pleasant crystal fountain, 
There she left her gilded coach, 
While the grove she did approach. 

Covered with her mask and walking, 
There she met her lover, talking — 
With a friend that he had brought. 
So she asked him whom he sought." 

" 1 am challenged by a gallant 
Who resolves to try my talent, 
Who he is I cannot say. 
But I hope to show him play." 

"It is I that did invite you: 
You shall wed me, or I'll fight you 

1 An error, as later record proves. 
E 



58 SKETCHES AND INCIDENTS OF THE ENGLISH FAMILIES. 

Underneath these spreading trees; 
Wherefore choose from which you please. 

You shall find I do not vapour; 
I have sought rny trusty rapier; 
Therefore take your choice," said she: 
"Either fight, or many me!" 

Said he, "Madam, pray what mean you? 
In my life I've never seen you; 
Pray unmask, your visage shew 
Then I'll tell you aye or no." 

" I will not my face uncover 
Till the marriage ties are over; 
Therefore choose you which you will, 
Wed me, sir, or try your skill. 

Step within that pleasant bower 
With your friend one single hour; 
Strive your thoughts to reconcile, 
And I'll wander here the while." 

While the beauteous lady waited, 
The young bachelor debated 
What was best for to be done, 
Quoth his friend, "The hazard run. 

If my judgment can be trusted, 
Wed her first, you can't be worsted ; 
If she's rich, you'll rise to fame, 
If she's poor, why you're the same." 

He consented to be married ; 
All three in a coach were carried 
To a church without delay, 
Where he weds the lady gay. 

Though sweet pretty cupids hovered 
Round her eyes, her face was covered 
With a mask, — he took her thus, 
Just " for better or for worse." 



Now he clothed in rich attire, 
Not inferior to a Squire ; 
Beauty, honor, riches' store, 
What can man desire more ? 

The ballad goes on to state that the pair went in her coach to 
the lady's elegant mansion, where leaving him in a parlor, she 
retired to dress herself in her finest attire, and by-and-by broke 
upon his vision, as a young and handsome woman, and his de- 
voted wife. 

It appears that Mr. Child took a position in society suitable 
to the fortune thus conferred upon him, and was high sheriff of 
the county, in 1714. 9 



92 



93 Entire ballad, with notes, in "Ancient Ballads and Songs of the Peas- 
antry," edited by Robert Bell, 1857. 



Of the Coat of Arms. 



That a Coat of Arms should be represented in the Geneal- 
ogy of a family long residing in a republic, may to some seem 
incongruous ; indeed we have in our intercourse with this wide- 
spread household, found those who have expressed more than 
indifference to this matter. Those who think highly of such 
memorials, will not need the following resume of the original 
use of such heraldic devices, but we believe we can make it 
apparent that if we are truly entitled to cherish these favors 
long ago conferred upon some unknown ancestor, we shall find 
all, eager for their preservation. I shall therefore make extracts 
from Burke, and DeBrete, (indisputable and well known au- 
thorities on such matters,) and from a very admirable 'little 
compilation, by Hugh Clarke, entitled "Introduction to Her- 
aldry:" 

"Heraldic devices, truly so called, make their first appear- 
ance in Europe in the middle of the twelfth century, and about 
one hundred years later we find Heraldry a science in hisrh re- 
pute, without being able to trace its intermediate progress, or 
discover the names of those who first laid down its laws, or 
subsequently promulgated them. The earliest Heraldic docu- 
ment of which even a copy has come down to us is a Roll of 
Arms, that is, a catalogue of armorial bearings of the Kings of 
England, and the principal barons, knights, &c, in the reign of 
Henry Third, and from internal evidence, supposed to have 
been compiled between the years 12-1-0 and 1245." In the 
reign of Henry Third armorial ensigns became hereditary, 
marks of cadency distinguishing various members of a family. 

The use of arms at that period was to distinguish persons and 
property, and record descent and alliance, and no modern in- 
vention has been found to supersede it. Only the members of 
a particular family can lawfully bear certain armorial ensigns, 
and the various branches of that family have their separate 
differences to distinguish one from the other. 



OF THE COAT OF ARMS. 

The shield, or escutcheon, (from the Latin word scutum, a 
hide, of which shields are supposed to have been originally 
made.) represents the defensive implement of that name used 
in war. and on which armorial e sig - were originally borne. 
The ground, or surface, is called a field, and here are depicted 
the figures which make up the coat of arms. The position of 
these different figures mark the distinct and different arms. 

' its were anciently marks of great honor, because they 
were worn only by heroes of great valor and high rank, that 
thev mierht be the better distinguished in an engagement : and 
thereby rally their men if dispersed. Crests appear on the hel- 
mets of knights as earl v as the thirteenth century; and after the 
institution of the Order of the Garter, and in imitation of Ed- 
ward III., who was the first King: of England that bore a crest on 
his helmet, all knights companions of the Order began to wear 
crests. This practice soon became more general, until at length 
they were assumed at discretion, by all who considered them- 
selves entitled to bear arms. They are at present considered 
mere ornaments. The crest is the highest part of the ornaments 
of a coat of arms, and is placed upon a wreath, unless it is issu- 
ant from a coronet, or standing on a chapeau. In the middle 
ages, no man who was under the degree of knight had his 
crest on a wreath, which is composed of two rolls of silk twisted 
tosrether, and of the color or metal of the arms. 

Mottoes are not always hereditary, and have been changed, 
varied, and relinquished at the pleasure of the bearer. As 
manv now in use have been oris;inallv war cries, and most are 
presumably associated with some deed of prowess or noble as- 
piration, it would seem desirable to retain those handed down. 

Arms are divided into eleven classes : 1st. Arms of Domin- 
ion, such as kings and emperors bear constantly on coins, stand- 
ards, seals, etc. 2d. Arms of Pretension, as the quartering of 
the amis of France with those of England, until 1801. 3d. 
Arms of Community, as those of bishoprics, cities, universities. 
etc. 4th. Arms of Assumption, formerly allowed when one 
captured a prisoner of higher rank than himself, he took his 
arms. 5th. Arms of Patronage, such as governors of provinces, 
patrons of benefices, add to their family arms. 6th. Arms of 
Succession, taken by those who inherit lands, manors. &&, by 
will, entail, and donation, and which thev add to their own. 



OF THE COAT OF ARMS. 61 

7th. Arms of Alliance, as when heiresses marry into families, 
are taken by their issue, to show their descent, paternal and 
maternal. 8th. Arms of Adoption, like arms of succession, 
called "of adoption" because the last of a family may, by will, 
adopt a stranger to possess his name, estate, and arms. 9th. 
Arms Paternal and Hereditary, such as are transmitted from 
the first possessor to his son, grandson, and succeeding genera- 
tions. 10th. Arms of Concession, are augmentations granted 
bv the sovereign, of part of his ensigns, or regalia, to such 
persons as he pleaseth to honor therewith. 11th. Canting or 
Allusive Arms, are coats of arms whose figures allude to the 
names, professions, &c, of the bearer, as three herrings for Her- 
ring, a camel for Camel, three covered cups for Butler, a pine 
tree for Pine, etc. Such arms have been mistakenly supposed 
by some to be of an inferior order, whereas there can scarcely 
be greater proof of their antiquity, and highly honorable char- 
acter." 

There are other distinctive marks attached to arms to mark 
the different sons of a house, and descent therefrom ; the dupli- 
cation or combination of these distinguishing figures carries on 
the ratio and line of descent. There are nine of these defining 
figures ; that of the eldest son is of this form / \ 

and is termed a label ; the second is a cres- 
cent: \__y the third is called a mullet ; ^ V the fourth a 

martlett (or small martin). vv^We give the marks of dis- 
tinction so far, for a reason apparent farther on. We 
think what we have quoted from these authorities will be a 
sufficient explanation of the desire, if we may lawfully do so, 
to hold as a memento of past worth, a coat of arms. 

We have found in the American families, what may be called 
three coats of arms, or more strictly, two. One bears upon its 
field three doves, the motto being " Imitari Quam Invidere. m 
The other has three eagles, in the same positions, with the same 
crest, and motto ; the third is a variation of the second, in hav- 
ing in its centre a small shield with a martlett, indicating 
the bearer to be the fourth son of the first house. Had 
the researches prosecuted years since through Mr. Horatio 
G. Somerby, and later by some members of the family, 

J;| Imitate rather than envy. 



62 OF THE COAT OF ARMS. 

succeeded in establishing the line from which the American 
families are descended, we could doubtless know with measur- 
able certainty to which we were entitled. Failing this, we give 
the grounds upon which we base our decision, and preface, with 
the fact that about the time of the Revolution, and later, a 
John Cole and his son made it their business to furnish fami- 
lies who desired them, coats of arms ; these were not wholly 
plagiarisms, as they generally, if not always, gave those which 
were borne by some family of the same name in Great Britain. 
Later research has shown many of these works to be spurious. 

The great grandfather of the compiler of this book,Mr. Henry 
Child of Woodstock, Ct., built in the } r ears 1761-2 a large and 
commodious house for his family, and as it stood upon a prin- 
cipal thoroughfare, and removed from the town, he opened 
therein an Inn, and hung out for his Inn-sign a transcript of a 
coat of arms ; this sign, now in preservation (though it ceased 
to swing out its welcome to the wayfarer many years ago), bears 
unmistakably the doves, and an octogenarian relative tells us, 
that "it was always called the family coat of arms, and the fig- 
ures were meant for doves." Rev. Dr. Willard Child (my un- 
cle) found some years since, in the old homestead, a torn copy 
of a coat of arms, upon which the figures are evidently doves. 
These escape the condemnation of Cole's manufactures, as they 
antedate his operations. We shall farther on give the coat of 
arms of an English family, resident in that county of England 
in which the New England emigrants have been thought to 
have originated, bearing doves, upon its field. 

Indeed we have found copies of a coat of arms in several 
families and lines. Among the descendants of Edward and 
Margaret Weld Child are found two copies alike in main 
points, but with some slight variations. In the Watertown 
branch, in the family of Ephraim Child, Jr., of Rutland, and 
West Bo}dston, Mass. In the Barnstable branch in the family 
of Dr. Timothy Childs ; and in a family of one of the southern 
branches. 

Mr. Addison Child, who has aided us much in furnishing 
the scholarly articles over his signature, has given much 
thought to this matter, and we have, upon consultation with 
him, accepted his view, which we thus sum up. 

The percentage of families bearing the arms with the eagles 
upon the field is so very much the larger, that any other form 



OF THE COAT OF ARMS. 63 

is but an occasional exception, therefore, presumably the coat 
of arms of the family would hear the eagles. 2d. Each advance 
we have made in establishing a link between the American and 
English families has pointed more and more strongly towards 
a family bearing the eagles upon their arms, circumstantially 
indicating a kinship with Richard Child, father of Sir John and 
Sir Josiah Child, whose notable careers are so graphically out- 
lined for us. Sir Josiah Child had Arms " Gules, a chevron en- 
grailed ermine, between three eagles close argent. Crest, an eagle 
/rings expanded argent enveloped with a snake proper?' Motto 
'*Imitari Quam Invidere." 

Sir John Child had Arms, "Vert two bars engrailed, between 
three leopard's faces or. Crest a leopard's face or, between two 
laurel brandies proper.' 1 Motto, "Spes Alit." We do not know 
when he took these Arms, but his baronetcy was conferred 
upon him in 1684, while he was resident in the East Indies. 
He might then have adopted the leopard's faces, as the leopard 
was a frequent enemy, and some deed of prowess may easily 
have led to this assumption, always such arms are regarded as 
most honorable. His title became extinct in 1753, and his 
Arms are not at present borne by any of the name, or others 
quartering the Child arms with their own. 

As some persons have a deep interest in armorial bearings, 
we give a condensed and abbreviated summary of facts on this 
point, gathered in our exhaustive search in the best collections 
of Heraldic lore available in America. In Burke's " General 
Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales," we found 
eighteen families of the name, .with their arms, &c; with eight 
the motto was given, and five had, " Imitari Quam Invideri." 

In Berry's " Encyclopedia Heraldic and Dictionary of Her- 
aldry," of eleven families Child, we find but one marked dif- 
ference in the arms: " Ermine on a chief indented gules, three 
escallops or." Of the larger number the Arms are " Gules, a 
clievron engrailed ermine, between three eagles close argent. 
Crest, an eagle, wings expanded or elevated argent enveloped 
will i a snake proper." Motto "Imitari Quam Invideri." This 
is the coat of arms we present as that which we may accept 
with large confidence. 

In the account by Burke of the family of the present Sir 
Smith Child, who was made baronet in 1868, we find his grand- 



64 OF THE COAT OF ARMS. 

father to have been " Admiral of the Blue, 1 ' and that " he en- 
tered the navy in 1747, under Earl Gower's auspices, and emi- 
nently distinguished himself in the service. He commanded 
the 'Europe' in the two actions off the Chesapeake; subse- 
quently, in 1795, he took command of the ' Commerce de Mar- 
seilles,' one hundred and twenty (120)guns, and attained his flag 
in 1799." He may have been accompanied by his son, Smith 
Child, whom we find to have married Miss Elizabeth Parsons, 
daughter of Timothy Parsons, Esq., of Massachusetts, U. S. 
He died early, leaving one son, the present baronet. 

The family of Child, North wick, Worcestershire, (as found 
in the 38th edition of Burke's "Baronetage and Peerage of 
Great Britain,") have Arms, " Gules a /esse ermine, between three 
doves argent. Crest a dove, wings expanded argent, with a snake 
twining about her neck and body or. v 

Should any desire to have a copy of these arms blazoned to 
hang in their homes, we append herewith the proper tinctures 
or colors for the Child arms, in such terms as will be readily 
apprehended : 

Shield gules (or red) in the groundwork, chevron white, en- 
grailed black, ermine black, outlines of the shield gilt, eagles 
argent (or silver), the coils of the wreath alternate red and gilt, 
eagle silver, snake black. We give also a brief glossary of the 
heraldic terms used : 

The Chevron is formed of two lines 

TINCTURES. 

_ ~ , , „ placed m the form of a pyramid, and 

Or— Gold, or yellow. L l J 

Argent— Silver, or white, descending in form of a pair of compasses 

Gules— Red. to the extremities of the shield. 

Azure— Blue. The fosse is formed by two horizontal 

Sable- Black. ^nes acrosg t ] ie s hi e hi comprising the 

\ (jff Green. 

centre third part of the escutcheon, em- 
blematic of the military girdle worn over the armor. The Bar, 
a diminutive of fesse. 

Engrailed, \j^KJ , ermine, sable spots on a white field, the 
tail terminating in three hairs ; erminois, black spots on gold 
field. Nebulee, r\r\/\/\j- Indented WW Cross croslet, is 
a cross crossed again at the extremities, at a small distance from 
each of the ends; cross croslet fitchee, so termed when the 
under limb of the cross ends in a sharp point. 



AMERICAN FAMILIES. 



CHAPTER I. 



1. EPHRAIM CHILD. 



Could we give the parentage of this first emigrant, Ephraim 
Child, it would be exceedingly gratifying. Since prosecuting 
this work, we have learned that the same uncertainty as to the 
paternity of the emigrants, has perplexed the chronicler of other 
families, arising as we have said elsewhere from the necessity 
for a quiet embarkation. The difficulty of restoring these lost 
links may be more easily understood, when it is remembered 
that many of the early emigrants were led to come from the 
motherland for greater freedom in their religious faith, and 
often sailed from some minor port, and no list of passengers was 
made or desired. That this was true of our emigrating ancestry, 
we do not know, it may have been, as but few of the name are 
found on any preserved list. A Michael Child and Thomas 
Child sailed from London to Virginia, and in connection with 
their names it is stated that they took the oath of allegiance to 
the established church. 

Ephraim Child, born in England in 1593, came to America 
in 1630, accompanied as seems probable by his nephew, Benja- 
min Child. 

The marriage of Ephraim Child to a widow, the Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Palmer, is recorded at Nayland, Suffolk county, England, 
on the bth of February, 1625. Mrs. Palmer is presumed to 
be the daughter of Jonas Bond of Bury St. Edmunds, of the 
same county. Ephraim Child was admitted freeman May 18th, 
1631, applied therefor the year previous. 

By virtue of his seniority and prominence in colonial affairs, 
Ephraim Childs takes precedence in the Genealogy, though not 
generally believed t( nave left descendants to bear his name or 



6Q EPHRAIM CHILD. 

retain his honors. He is known as the personal friend of 
Governor John Winthrop of Massachusetts, and from this 
circumstance may have arisen the impression that, like Gov. 
Winthrop, Mr. Child was a native of Suffolk county, England. 

Mr. Ephraim Child occupied a leading position in Water- 
town, Massachusetts ; a man of property, and piety, he was 
often chosen to places of trust and responsibility in town and 
county affairs ; and held office in the church as one of the first 
deacons. For twelve years he is found a representative at the 
General Court, a post, then, bestowed only upon those of known 
integrity, mental power, and financial ability. 

His judgment is also attested in his appointment by the 
County Court one of the Commissioners to '"end small causes ;" 
and from the esteem of his fellow-citizens he was elected one of 
the selectmen of the town for fifteen years. 

His death occurred on the thirteenth of February 1663, when 
seventy years of age. His will dated, the tenth of November, 
1662, is given as of interest, and from the fact that we gather 
therefrom certain clues to further record. Bond, one of our 
authorities, says, "the appraisal of his homestall and the amount 
of his inventory (£770 15) show that he was one of the most 
affluent of the settlers, and the distribution of his widow's 
wardrobe and furniture by her will, show that she had some of 
the elegancies as well as the comforts of life.' 1 

117// of Ephraim Child. 

Novemb. 20th I give unto William Bond, father, forty acres of my Lands 
1662 . on the hither Plain, and I give unto Richard Child and John 

Child all the rest of that Land with all other lands abroad, 
namely, my remote meadow, my Farm any upon the further plain, with the 
land called Township-land, to the end that before my estate be broken, care 
and endeavour be used, either by improving or by sale, my Debts may be se- 
cured and all have their own, and withal my will is that there' be twenty 
cord of Wood cut out every year if it be there for the use of my wife, so long 
as she lives. I give unto my dear and loving wife my dwelling house and 
Lott with all that appertains thereunto, also my Divident, Dorchester Field, 
and my meadow upon the other side of the river, with all my Goods and 
Chattels for her maintenance as long as she lives, and allow her Te— [oblit- 
erated] pounds of that Estate then in being to dispose of as she pleases pr 
de— {obliterated'] being dead. My will is that Ephraim Child the son of 
Benjamin Child should inhabit my dwelling-house and Lott: with one half 
•my Divident and Dorchester field, my coz. William Bond, the Father the 
other half of my Divident and the meadow upon the other side of the river, 
and the remainder of the Estate which then shall be, be equally divided. 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURV. MASS. G7 

both Goods within (as nothing be defaced, but all that is nailed fast remain 
to the house) and all The chattels abroad unto Richard Child. John Child, 
Ephraim Child, and William Bond above named. And to that end I do 
appoinl my dear wife and my loving Coz. Willia n Bond to be my executors. 
I give unto my dearly beloved Pastour ten pounds, to Mary Rowles wife 
to John Parker a Cow with Clf. I give forty shilling- a year forever to be 
paid out of my lands towards the maintenance of a Schoolmaster in Water- 
town. I give my servant David one Cow. bullocks and unto Samuel Burk 

two Ewes. 

Thi- is the will of me, 

Ephraim Child. 



BENJAMIN CHILD. 

[First Generation.] 

2. Benjamin Child, who emigrated from Great Britain 
to America, and became the head of the larger number of the 
families of the name on this side of the Atlantic, from strong 
presumptive evidence was the nephew of Ephraim Child of 
Watertown. with whom we commence this Genealogy. Patri- 
archal in the best sense, we find Mr. Child to have been earnest 
in character, and in the promotion of # that puritan stamp of 
piety for which the Massachusetts settlers were especially dis- 
tinguished Mr. Benjamin Child was of that order of nobility 
bearing the stamp affixed at the departure from Eden. Metho- 
dical and exact in habit Mr. Child is known to have been ; and 
legal manuscripts carefully preserved at the present time by 
some of his descendants, attest his familiarity with affairs, and 
fine standing in the community. 

In the records of Roxbury. Mr. Benjamin Child is stated to 
have been of the thirty who contributed the joint sum of £104. 
05s. for the erection of the First Church of Roxbury; one of 
the customs peculiar to the period connected with the building 
of this "meeting-house." was a "raising," the bill of expenses 
and provisions amounting to £'20 15s. lOd. and £9 os. "to the 
hands for et ceteras." 

Bearing the name of the youngest son of the Head of the 
Israelites, Mr. Benjamin Child, like that patriarch, " in the land 
wherein he was a stranger,' - became the father of twelve chil- 
dren, an example his descendants have satisfactorily emulated. 
We are very glad also to say in this connection, that the pro- 



68 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS. 



bity, sterling integrity, and devout conscientiousness of their 
progenitor, are found to have been transmitted, in complete 
verification of the strong assurances of the Decalogue. 

Of the time or place of Mr. Benjamin Child's marriage, we 
are ignorant, and only know that his wife bore the sweet name, 
Mary, was like her scriptural predecessors a follower of the 
.Master; "was admitted to the Church of Roxbury in 1658;" 
she survived her husband, though we know not for what length 
of time. Mr. Benjamin Child died the fourteenth day of Octo- 
ber, 1678, residing at that time in Roxbury, near Jamaica Pond 
(or the Great Pond), as it was then called ; and his estate there 
has been the homestead of his direct descendants until a few 
years since. 

The accompanying inventory of his estate and effects, the 
original of which, complete and clear, is held in choice keeping 
in the family, is appended, that his posterity, scattered through 
nearly every State in the Union, may be informed of the exact 
fortune left by their greatest grandfather in America : 

1679. 
Benjamin Child, his Inventory. 

[Copy.] 

An Inventory of the Estate of Benjamin Child, late of Roxbury, tcho dyed 
14th October, in the year of our Lord 1678. 

£ s. d. 
A House and Barne 80 00 00 

80 acres of Land conveniently adjoining to y e 3d housing 320 00 00 

12 acres in the thousand acres 3 00 00 

2 cows at 50s. per cow, and more at 40s. ; 2 yearling heifers at 40s. 9 00 00 

One horse and a mare at 40s. $ each and one sow at 16s . 4 16 00 

Money in the House and in good hands 13 00 00 

In the parlor: 3 silver spoons and one wine cup 1 14 00 

One standing w th curtains, valines, old rug, 2 blankets, / 

bolster and pillow .[•••• 5 00 00 

One trundle bedstead w th a feather bed, bolster, blankets and ) nn nA 
covering c •* 00 UO 

One old court cupboard, 10s. ; 3 chests, 20s. 1 10 00 

8 pair of sheets at 8s 3 04 00 

3 fine Table cloths, being worne, 10s.; 11 napkins, 7s. ; 3 pair ) . nn AA 

pillow bears, 10s - 1 07 00 

All his wearing clothes, woolen & linen, shoes, stockings, and ) ~ AA A „ 
hats , f « 00 00 

One carbine 12s , one fowling piece 18s., one Rapier 5s 1 15 00 

Parlor chamber: one feather bed and a flock bed under it, w th ) 

bolsters to them and pillows to the feather bed; 2 old [ 3 00 00 
blankets and an old Rug \ 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 69 

101b of Flax 

In the Kit chin: Brass 41. 10s; Pewtar 35s. spoons & tinners ware 3s. 
fire pan-tnngs, 1 old spit, 'J pair tramels, an old frying) 
pan, an old Iron pot ami two pair of pool hookes j 

A kneading trough '-2s., and old table 2s., 2 ehairesand a woolen / 
wheel Is ) 

A powdering tubb, butter churn, old pailes, wooden bottle, i 
trenchers and other I aim her ) 

Bridle and saddle 7s. ; an axe and a bill. 3s 

A cart with shod wheeles (3 yeares old), tackling for horses ) 
draught and a piece of an old timber chain ) 

An acre and halt'e of salt marsh 10 00 00 

5i acres of Land at the pond plains 25 00 00 

One Horse more 2 10 00 



10 00 


G 08 00 


15 00 


08 00 


12 00 


10 00 


4 00 00 



£506 19 00 



Inventoryed and apprized this 24 day of October, in the yea re of our 
Lord one thousand six hundred seventy and eight, by John Weld Sen r , John 
Gore, John Weld and Mary Childe, admitt d Adm 8 made Oath in Court pr e 
May 1679, to the truth of the above Inventory, and that when more appeares 
they will adde it. Attests, Is a - Addington, Cler. 

Vera Copia of its Original on y e file of Inventory 8 Ann" 1679. 

Attest e s : Is*- Addington, Cler. 

[Second Generation.] Children: 

3. i. Ephraim Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. 1654. killed in battle. 

4. ii. Benjamin Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass, 1656, m. Mar. 7, 16S3, Grace 
Morris. 

5. iii. Joshua Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. 1658, m. May, 9, 1685, Eliza- 
beth Morris. 

6. iv. Mary Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Aug. 8, 1660, m. Jan. 24, 1683, 
Jacob Chamberlain. 

7. v. An infant, no name, b. 1662. 

8. vi. Elizabeth Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Dec. 2, 1663, num. 

9. vii. Margaret Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Dec. 21, 1665, unmarried, 
d. July 15. 1742. 

10. viii. John Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Jan. 8, 1667, d. yg. 

11. ix. Mehitable Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. June 29, 1669, in. Samuel 
Perrin. 

12. x. John Child 2d, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Aug. 1, 1671, m. 

13. xi. Joseph Child, Ii. in Roxbury, Mass, June 1, 1678, d. yg. 

14. xii. Joseph Child 2d, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Dec. 10, 1674. 

[Second Generation] 

3. i. Ephraim Child, second of the name in America, and 
eldest son of Benjamin Child of Roxbury, was born in Rox- ■ 
bury in 1654. He was baptized a few years later with two 
younger brothers, by the Rev. John Elliot, pastor of the 
Church in Roxbury. of which his parents were members. He 
was made, by his great uncle, Mr. Ephraim Child of Watertdwn, 



70 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

heir to a large portion of his estate ; he had not long entered 
upon these possessions when the Massachusetts colony was dis- 
tracted and devastated by the relentless slaughter of many of 
its inhabitants, in combats known as "Phillip's "War." Ephraim 
Child, with other valiant young men under command of Capt. 
Beers, was slain by the Indians at Northfield, Massachusetts, 
on the 23d of September, 1675. 

Thus was Mr. Benjamin Child called to seal his faith in the 
consecration of his eldest born upon the altar of patriotism ; 
and the young man, though leaving no wife or child to mourn 
his early death, has yet bequeathed to those of his race an her- 
itage of honorable self-sacrifice, for native land and for the 
right. His property was shared by his brothers and sisters. 

[Second Generation.] 

4. ii. Benjamin, second son and child of Benjamin and 
Mary Child of Roxbury, was born in Roxbury, in 1656. The 
death of his elder brother, Ephraim Child, gave him the sen- 
iority in his father's family, and the British laws of primogeni- 
ture being then in force in the colonies, he was thereby the in- 
heritor of the larger share of his father's property, or the Ben- 
jamic "double portion " 

He remained at the homestead, and we believe felt constrained 
to follow in all good wa} 7 s the example of his parents. Moved 
by the charms of a fair young maiden, he asked her hand in 
marriage, and on the 7th of March, 1683, he was united in holy 
wedlock to Grace Morris, who was born Feb. 17, 1661, a daugh- 
ter of Deacon Edward and Grace Belt Morris. "Dea. Morris 
was one of the projectors and early settlers of the town of 
Woodstock, Ct. From 1677 to 1684, he was one of the select- 
men of Roxbury, and during the same period was also a dep- 
uty from that town to the General Court of Massachusetts, and 
during part of the time Colonial Auditor. Grace Morris was 
admitted to the church June 21, 1681.'" ' The goodly number 
of twelve sons and daughters again made eheery the Puritan's 
demure household. Deed of sale of the property of his brother 
Ephraim, is on record in the name of Benjamin Child, who 
acted for the heirs. We give the quaint document accompany- 
ing — wherein he settles with brothers and sisters in the parti- 
tion of the paternal heritage, as many will be interested to look 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS 71 

in this way into the past 5 This union, so complete, was bro- 
ken by death, but for an exceedingly brief period. Mrs. Grace 
.Morris Child died on the 10th of December, 1723, and her hus- 
band joined her on the 24th of January, 1724. 

[Third Generation.] Children: 

15. i. Ephbaim Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Dee. 18, 1683. m. 1710, Pris- 
eilla Han is. 

10. ii. Benjamin Child, Jun.. b. in Roxbury, Mass., July 19, 1685, m. 
171-2. Patience Thayer. 

17. iii. Edward Child, b. in Roxbury. Mass. Nov. 1, 1087, in. 1712. Mar- 
garet Weld. 

18. iv. Grace Child, b. in Roxbury. Mass. Oct 27. 1689, m. Timothy 
Walker. 

19. v. Mary Child, b. in Roxbury. Mass. Oct. 25, 1691, m. June 9, 1715, 
Peter Walker. 

20. vi. Ebexezer Child, b in Roxbury, Mass. Sept. 7, 169?, m. 1720, 
Elizabeth Bacon. 

21. vii. Mehitable Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Jan. 5, 1095. 

22. viii. William Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Oct. 14, 1097, m. 1723, 
Deborah Goddard. 

23. ix. Penuel Child, b. in Roxbury. Mass. Sept. 3, 1699, m. March 7, 
1724, Dorothy Dwight. 

24. x. Richard Child, b. in Roxbury. Mass. Oct. 22, 1701, d. May 18, 1759. 

25. xi. Thomas Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. Nov. 10, 1703, m. Sep. 27, 
1729, Anna Morris, dau. of Ebenezer Morris, and gr. dau. of Dea. Edward 
Morris. 

20. xii. Margaret Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass. May 26, 1706. 

1 This account is given by a descendant of Dea. Edward Morris. 
2 Given on two following pages. 



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74 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



CHAPTER II 



WOODSTOCK FAMILIES. 

It will be found by a close observation of the records, that a 
restless spirit has moved upon the family at intervals, resulting 
in an emigration of numbers. The first movement of this kind 
in America was made from Eoxbury, Mass. to the new settle- 
ment of New Eoxbury, made as it was supposed, within the 
bounds of the Massachusetts colony. "Need for more extended 
pasturage," awakened the residents of Roxbury to action, and 
resulted in accordance with the custom of the period, in refer- 
ring the matter to the minister, the Eev. John Elliot, first pastor 
of the Eoxbury church ; a man whose labors on behalf of the 
Indians has consecrated his name forever. In the various jour- 
neyings Mr. Elliot had made in this missionary work, he had 
noted very correctly the soil and climate of the Massachusetts 
and Connecticut colonies, and upon his commendation the se- 
lectmen of Eoxbury petitioned the General Court of the Massa- 
chusetts colony for a grant of land, then supposed to be within 
the boundaries of that colony, which was awarded them, and 
some thirteen of their number were appointed " to spy out and 
take possession." The section within which selection was made 
at that period was known as the "Nipmuck, or Nipmung coun- 
try ;" but few Indians remained in the immediate vicinity, the 
larger number had been slain in "King Phillip's War." The 
Indian name for the location was " Wabquassit, or Wappaquas- 
sit." Here the "Apostle Elliot" had preached to the Indians 
on the 16th of September, 1674, and the colonists felt a bless- 
ing must attend a place thus consecrated. 

Reluctant to unlink them from the homesteads, the new set- 
tlement was for a period called New Eoxbury, but from this it 
would seem some conflicting claims arose, and petition was had 
to the General Court for a change of name, granted to them on 
the eighteenth of March, 1690. The private diary of Judge 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 75 

Samuel Sewall of Boston, says, " I gave New Roxbury the 
name of Woodstock, because of its nearness to Oxford, for the 
sake of Queen Elizabeth, and the notable meetings that have 
been held at that place bearing the name in England," Wood- 
stock, Connecticut, lying eight miles apart from Oxford, Massa- 
chusetts, as do the old towns of the names in Great Britain. 
A brief enumeration of some of the historical associations clus- 
tering in and about the old town of Woodstock in the mother- 
land, may not be amiss for the instruction of the younger mem- 
bers of this clan, resident in Connecticut, or claiming descent 
therefrom. The Saxon and Norman kings made this place a 
royal residence ; here King Alfred, whose religious and literary 
culture was so superior for the time, pursued his studies ; here 
Princess Elizabeth was retired to escape the intriguing machi- 
nations of Queen Mary's suspicious advisers. Sir Walter Scott 
founds one of his Waverley novels upon a legend of the town. 

An amusingly brief and explicit classification of the people 
of Roxbury is made in the records of transfer to the new 
settlement ; those emigrating were termed " Goers," those re- 
maining "Stayers."' The division of the land was made by 
lot. at a meeting held for the purpose, the minister opening 
with prayer. After appropriating a certain number of acres 
for a site for the '•meetinghouse 1 ' and the "burial ground," 
with a reserved quarry for "hearth and building stone," a por- 
tion of twenty acres for each householder was made, the exact 
location of this homestead being attained by the lot. We find 
the minister drew the third lot. The local name given to this 
village location was "Plain Hill," now known as the "South 
Parish Hill of Woodstock." The erection of a pastor's hoi 
was decided upon at a town meeting on the 27th of October, 
1690, with the details of size, "four stacks of chimneys and 
gables," the building to be sufficiently completed for use within 
two years. As a defence from the ravages of fire, each inhab- 
itant was ordered to provide a ladder and buckets for his house 
before a stated day, and "Jonathan Peak was to see that this 
was done." This ordinance for ladders and buckets we find to 
have been made six years before the establishment of the first 
fire insurance company in England. Mr. John Chandler, Jr., 
by an act at a regular town meeting, " was requested and pro- 



76 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



cured to teach the children to read, write and cipher." ' The 
colony thus sent out into the wilderness was never forgotten 
by those remaining in Roxbury, but was "the constant subject 
of prayer by the Roxbury church, the Rev. Mr. Elliot being 
wont on every Sabbath in his public prayers in the church uni- 
formly to pray for the 'colony in New Roxbury.'" But on 
one occasion, when the congregation had assembled on the Sab- 
bath for worship, the pious Elliot neglected to mention in his 
prayers the " colony of New Roxbury," closed and took his 
seat. This neglect of the minister was noticed by the goodly 
fathers and mothers of the church with great pain, and they 
began to fear the children at New Roxbury would be devoured 
by the wild beasts or destroyed by the Indians, and the iniquity 
of the fathers visit their children, because they had been omitted 
by the godly Elliot. While the good mothers were thus sit- 
ting depressed in spirit at so great a neglect, it occurred to the 
minister that he had not made mention of the New Roxbury 
colony in his prayer, and he immediately arose in his pulpit 
and exclaimed : " Alas ! alas ! I forgot to pray for our sons and 
daughters at New Roxbury, and therefore let us again pray ! " 
He made a most fervent prayer, especially for the colony, much 
to the comfort and relief of the consrregation. 

We do not find any of the Child name on the list of the 
first " goers," but a few years later the name occurs frequently 
upon the town records, as actors in the differing posts of honor 
and toil, in affairs of the town, and in the defence of colony and 
country from internal and external foes. At this early period, 
we find seven brothers of the Child name settled in the north 
part of the town. The scarcity of " neat cattle " in the new 
world limited the supply so that many who would wish to do 
so were unable to own any. One cow was owned by these seven 
brothers, Child, and they took turns in the use of her, one week 
at a time, except immediately before the Thanksgiving Day, 
when the elder brother was allowed to keep the cow long enough 
to accumulate a supply of milk which should suffice to enable 
the gathered households to enjoy a "Thanksgiving Supper of 
hasty pudding and milk." On one occasion of the annual gath- 
ering of the seven households, beneath the elder brother's roof 

1 The major portion of these facts were culled from a work by Holmes 
Ammidown, Esq., entitled "Historical Collections." 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 77 

the supper was duly prepared, and set forth upon a large " fall- 
leaf-table," each family provided with their wooden bowls and 
wooden spoons. According to their custom, all were standing 
around the frugal supper, while the elder brother, as patriarch, 
asked the Divine blessing; while thus solemnly engaged, the 
large watch dog, in passing under the table, moved the leg up- 
holding the leaf, and down went table, milk and pudding. The 
younger brother saw the table falling, and cried out. "Stop, 
brother! Stop! stop! The pudding is gone, and the milk is 
gone, and of what use is the blessing now; but kill the dog I " 
The Puritan training, though thoroughly observed and rever- 
enced, could not wholly subdue the natural temper, or exclude 
all humor from the occasional gatherings of young or old. 

In 1690, a Congregational Church and Societ}'- was organized, 
and religious services maintained for several years without a 
settled minister, when the Eev. Josiah Dwight was installed as 
pastor, which relation he held for thirty-seven years with mutual 
satisfaction of pastor and people, when an unfortunate difference 
with regard to church discipline and some other matters sprung 
up which led to the termination of the pastorate. Mr. Dwight 
was esteemed as a man of decided talents, and religiously de- 
voted to the interests of his charge during his long pastorate. 
The revolution in this church led to the organization of the 
church and society in " Muddi Brook,'" now East Wood- 
stock, in the year 1759, by the majority who claimed to 
be the first church of Woodstock. A new house of worship 
was erected in this parish ; the church records were retained by 
this majority, and a pastor, Eev. William Graves, w T as installed, 
while the minority remained undisturbed in their original place 
of worship, and in possession of the Society's property. 

[Third Generation.] 

15. i. Efhraim Child, first child of Benjamin and Grace Mor- 
ris Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Dec. IS, 1683, m. 1710, Pris- 
cilla Harris, dau. of Dan'l Harris of Brookline. Mass. He d. 
Nov. 22, 1759. She was b. June 4, 1684. She d. June 26. 
1780, set. 96. 

Ephraim Child was the eldest of the seven brothers who mi- 
grated from Roxbury, Mass., to "New Roxbury," Ct. (afterwards 
called Woodstock). He removed shortly before or immediately 



78 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

after his marriage, in 1710, and settled in that part of the town 
now called East Woodstock (anciently known as Muddi Brook), 
erecting for himself a house, which, with some additions, has 
been retained in the line of his male descendants till the pres- 
ent time, covering a period of quite 170 years. Its enlarge- 
ment, at a somewhat early period, made it as it now stands, a 
commodious and attractive home. Its site is in a beautiful 
vale, about half a mile east of East Woodstock village. It was 
probably at this house where occurred the amusing incident on 
a Thanksgiving occasion, which is found recorded in the early 
part of this chapter. Many pleasant memories cluster around 
this ancient home. It has been the birthplace of sons and 
daughters, whose history, with that of a long line of descend- 
ants, it is pleasant to trace. In this house hospitalities for 
many generations have been liberally dispensed to kindred and 
aliens, particularly on the Sabbath, when, in the interval be- 
tween the morning and afternoon religious service, numbers of 
worshippers living remote from the place of worship, accepted 
as an accorded right, a hearty meal of boiled meats and vege- 
tables, or a soporific lunch of hasty pudding and milk; this 
latter being the favorite repast, particularly of one, who could 
not resist the luxury of a quiet nap under the afternoon sermon. 

These were the good old times which the elder men of the 
present age like to recall, and which link them to the memory 
of uncles, aunts, grandfathers and grandmothers. 

Before this ancient dwelling stands a magnificent elm, whose 
trunk and outspreading branches are emblematical of a noble 
ancestor and his sturdy descendants. In 1S76 this stately elm 
was christened the " Centennial Tree." More than one hun- 
dred years had passed since man and beast had rested beneath 
its grateful shade. 

Mr. Ephraim Child was a prominent man of his day. He 
was intelligent, patriotic, enterprising, generous and self-sacri- 
ficing. His patriotism was kindled by the stirring incidents of 
the times, and he was among the first of the early defenders of 
colonial interests. In 1753 he held a commission as Lieutenant 
in Company 17, in 11th Kegiment of Infantry, in Connecticut, 
and was active in the revolutionary struggles for independence. 
He was a man of broad views, of a warm and sympathetic na- 
ture, living for others quite as much as for himself. Earnest 



'9 




ERECTED BY EPHRAIM CHILD. 1735 



A XI i BIS DESCENDANTS. 79 

in efforts for the public good, lie drew around him men l< 
brave, who shared in his sympathies and profited by his counsels. 
In church affairs he was conscientious, steadfast and reliable, a 
leader whose integrity and wisdom secured the confidence of his 
Christian brethren, and rendered him a lit man to transmit to 
posterity, attractive and valuable characteristics. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

27. i. Ephraim Child, Jr , b. in Woodstock. Jan. 15, 1711, m. Jan. 20. 
1734. Mary Lyon. 

28. ii. Daxiel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. Jan. 1, 1713, in. first Jan. 1, 
1747, to Ruth Ammidown Curtis, second m. to Abigail Bridges. 

29. iii. Priscilla Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Mar. 7, 1715, d. Sep. 6, 1736. 

30. iv. Henry Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.,May 28, 1717, in. twice, first 
1742 Rebecca Bacon. She d. Nov. 2, 1772. His second m. was July 6, 1757. 
to Dorothy Child. 

31. v. Meiiitable Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 8, 1718, ra. July 3, 
1741, Nehemiah Lyon. 

32. vi. Mary Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct.. April 12, 1721, m. first March 
20, 1746, Job Revere, m. second June 11, 1747, Stephen May. 

33. vii. Esther Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Sept. 6, 1722. Not known, 
whether she married. Hied April 9, 1789. 

34. viii. Elisha Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. Feb. 11. 1725. m. Jan. 20, 
1750, Alice Manning. 

35. ix. Peter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 6, 1727, m. Dec. 10, 1756, 
Susanna Child. 

36. x. Johanna Child, twin sister of Peter, b. July 6, 1727. d. Mar. 21, 1756. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

27. i. Ephraim Child, first child of Ephraim and Priscilla 
Harris Child, b. in Woodstock Ct.. Jan. 15, 1711, m. June, 20, 
1731, Mary Lyon. He d. Sept. 12, 1775. She d. April 21, 
1790. The}' - had four children. Residence in Woodstock, Ct. 

[Fifth Generation ] Children: 

37. i. Priscilla Child, b. 1737, m. Jonathan Bacon. 

38. ii. Increase Child, b. Dec. 13, 1740, m. Nov. 3. 1762. Olive Pease. 

39. iii. Asa Child, b. April 6, 1743, m. Nov. 16, 1793, Elizabeth Murray. 

40. iv. Theoda Child, bapt. April 7, 1745, d. Dec. 12, 1748. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

38. ii. Increase Child, second child of Ephraim and Mary 
Lyon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 13, 1740, m. Olive Pease 
of Somers, Ct, Nov. 3, 1 762. She was b. March 10, 1738, d. July 
5, 1822, in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., TST. Y. He d. June 10, 
1810, in the same town. They had nine children. 



80 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

From papers furnished by one of the descendants of Increase 
Child, we obtain items of his history which reveal a somewhat 
eventful life, showing manliness, patriotism, and personal vir- 
tues. Captain Increase, as he comes to our notice, is a lusty, 
bur-ly youth, of a mercurial temperament, of an adventurous 
disposition, not content with the monotony of a home devoid of 
excitements, bent upon knowing and seeing what was going on 
in the world. At scarcely sixteen years of age, when Israel 
Putnam was commissioned by the Connecticut colony as cap- 
tain, in 1755, in the French war, young Increase, in response 
to the call for volunteers, was among the first to be enrolled, 
and served through the seven years' campaign of this war. He 
fought in the battles at Crown Point and Ticondaroga. At the 
time of Putnam's capture, in 1756, young Child was marching 
near him. The Indians seized Putnam and bound him to a 
tree, where he was exposed to the fire of both friends and foes. 
How Putnam was extricated from his position, our informant 
does not tell. But he lived, as we know, to fight the battles 
of the Kevolution. Returning to the old homestead at the close 
of this war, he tarried but a short time, when he left and went 
to Dutchess county, N. Y., and engaged in school teaching in a 
place called "Oblong," deriving its name probably from its 
peculiar shape, as a point of land adjacent to the Hudson river. 
After spending a few years in teaching, he returned to Wood- 
stock, Ct., and married Miss Pease of Somers He made Wood- 
stock, Ct., his home for a number of years, rearing some of his 
children, if not all, in this town, when the attractions of the then 
west brought him back to the borders of the Hudson river. 
Taking his eldest son (Salmon Child), then a lad, on horseback 
behind him, he went to Dutchess county, N. Y., provided a 
home, and brought over his family, and settled there. 

When the Revolutionary war broke out, he enlisted under 
General Schujder, as captain. Under Generals Schuyler and 
Gates he served through the war and obtained an honorable 
discharge. In this campaign his son (Salmon) acted at first as 
a waiter for his father, being too young at the commencement 
of the war to be taken as a soldier, but before its close his 
name was enrolled on the list of volunteers. The excitements 
and hardships of war during an eight years' service were not 
sufficient to break the force of will and purpose in Captain In- 



AND III- DESCENDANTS. 81 

crease Child. The northern section of the State of New York, 
through which the army of Schuyler and Grates had been led, 
presented such attractions to Captain Child that he resolved to 
make it his future home. His settlement was in Milton, Sara- 
toga county, N. Y., where he became a permanent and useful 
citizen. The early opportunities of Captain Increase Child for 
a substantial education, that should qualify him for practical life, 
had been well improved. He was an excellent penman, and a 
competent surveyor and conveyancer, and a man of excellent 
general business capacity. The inherent force of character 
evinced by Increase Child in budding youth did not expend 
itself in riper years: nor did it expire at his death and leave no 
traces in the long line of descendants of this remarkable man. 
As we trace the history of this branch of the family name, there 
lies along the entire line, at not very wide intervals, the most 
robust and sturdy qualities of mental and physical manliness 
and moral worth. The children of Captain Increase Child were 
among the best and most enlightened citizens of their day. Nor 
have succeeding generations exhibited less noble, manly, patri- 
otic and intelligent characteristics. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

41. i. Hayilax Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 13, 1763, d. Aug. 19, 
1766. 

42. ii. Salmon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sep. 19, 1765, in. Jan. 7, 
L787, Olive Hose. 

43. lii. Roxalaxa Child. Ii in Woodstock, Ct., June 17. 1767, d. young. 

44. iv. Roxalaxa Child, 2d. 1». in Woodstock, Ct.. May 3. 1769, m. Robert 
Ackerman, d. at Pillar Point. X Y. 

45. v. Mark Axthoxy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 10, 1771, in. 
Dec. 8. 1793, Hannah Benedict, m. 2d 1819, Submit Peacock. 

46. vi. Ephraim Child. I). May 10, i773. in. Jan 1, 1796, Mary Wood- 
worth . 

47. vii. Olive Child, b. Mar. 11. 1775. m. 1798. Alfred Bosworth. 

48. viii William Child, b Jan. 4, 1777. m. Feb. 5, 1820, Polly Weed. 

49. ix. Asa Child, b. May 21. 1780, m. 1806. Lois Foote. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

42. ii. Judge Salmon Child, second child of Captain Increase 
and Olive Pease Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Sept. 19. 1765, 
m. Jan. 7. 1787, Olive Rose. She was b. Oct 23, 1763, and 
died May 2. 1825. He died at East Troy, Walworth Co., 
Wisconsin, Jan. 2S. 1856. They had five children. 



82 



BENJAMIN CHILD, OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



Judge Salmon Child in his boyhood received his education 
amid the stirring scenes of the Colonial Revolution. His sur- 
roundings in his youth were of a character to foster manly sen- 
timents and noble aspirations. His contact with men of large 
ideas and elevated purposes helped to develop him into the 
man he was in after life. When his father, Captain Increase 
Child, returned from the French War, with experiences full of 
stirring incident, the son could but catch the spirit and imbibe 
the sentiments of the father. Thus was laid the foundation of 
a noble character in the great and good man he came to be in 
after life. As already related in his father's history, he entered 
the Revolutionary army at an early age, serving as his father's 
waiter, being too young for regular service. When arrived at 
the proper age, he put on the trappings of the soldier, and 
fought the battles of freedom by the side of his patriot sire. 
At the close of the war he went with his father to Saratoga 
county, K Y., and effected an independent settlement in the 
town of Greenfield in that county. In 1787 he married Olive 
Rose, and entered upon a new career of life. His experiences 
in the army, conjoined with inherent qualities of sound sense 
and uncommon sagacity, fitted him for the duties of civil life. 
His influence as a leading citizen in town and county was early 
acknowledged, and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow 
citizens is clearly indicated by the official positions to which he 
was elected by their suffrages. But it was not in a civil capac- 
ity alone that Judge Child contributed a healthful influence to 
the conditions of society. Few men could be found at that 
period more truly conscientious, and who comprehended more 
clearly the importance of educational and religious institutions 
in establishing a prosperous communit}^. The estimate in 
which Judge Child was held in the town and county where he 
spent a long life will be seen in an obituary notice, taken from 
a Saratoga, N. Y., weekly paper, which we give in this connec- 
tion : 

DIED.— January 28, 1856, in Walworth county, Wisconsin, Hon. Sal- 
mon Child. 

Judge Salmon Child was for a long time a resident of Saratoga county, 
X. Y. He was one of the first settlers in West Greenfield, more than seventy 
years ago, and resided there until a few years since, when he and his family 
removed West. He was a pensioner, having when quite young gone out 
with his father, who was a captain in the Revolutionary war. He was a 



AND HIS DESCKXDANTS.. 83 

prominent member of the Baptist Church, and had much to do in its forma- 
tion and maintenance where lie resided. He was one of the six or eighl 
men in Greenfield who formed one of the first temperance societies in tins 
county, in ISO'J. He was a plain fanner, a plain common-sense man, and 
ever sustained an irreproachable, moral and religious character: the great 
weight of which brought him into public life. He was twice elected as 
Member of Assembly from this county, and was appointed and served for a 
number of years as first judge of the county. He was elected in 1821 a mem- 
ber of the convention to amend the Constitution of the State of New York. 
Perhaps no non-professional man ever received a greater share of public 
offices in the county. He has served out a long life (91 yrs.) of usefulness. 
He died calmly and in peace, and has entered upon the rest prepared for 
the people of (rod. 

We append the following quotations from the writings of 
Judge Salmon Child, as illustrating his times and himself. In 
part, they are from a long letter addressed to his granddaughter 
and her husband, when the Judge was eighty-five years of age, 
and from :m article prepared for a newspaper publication called 
the Reposilor;/. The letter begins with a clear statement of his 
religious faith, especially his strong belief in the Trinity, quot- 
ing from the Old and New Testaments, passages elucidating 
and verifying his deductions, bringing out with unmistakable 
emphasis the doctrines of free will and moral responsibility, 
closing this portion of the letter with these words : 

The history both of the Old Testament and the New, and of the Church 
of Christ down to t he present day, teaches us that settling down on a form of 
Godliness, without the spirit or power thereof, God abhors. And it is the 
stronghold, the foundation of anti-Christ's kingdom. As long as a Christian 
or a Christian church live in the faith, in the love, spirit and obedience of 
the Gospel of Christ, they will grow in grace and in knowledge daily, and 
become the "salt of the earth," the light of the world, a "city set on a hill 
that cannot be hid." 

He then gives some account of his early life: 

My parents and grandparents lived in Woodstock, Connecticut. My 
grandfather belonged to what was then called the "Standing Order," since, 
"Congregationalists." They were very strict in keeping the Sabbath and 
all the forms of religion, as they tindersto d them. They kept Saturday 
night. All kind of labor, in doors and out, was laid aside as soon as the 
sun set, and if it was necessary they should boil victuals for the Sabbath, 
every thing was prepared and put into the pot before the sun set. They 
took the whole family to meeting, and after returning, and supper was over, 
the children were taught the Westminster catechism, or other religious ex- 
ercises, until the sun set, which was watched very closely by us children, 
and not forgotten by the elders. The moment it was said, " It is sundown," 
the men were out preparing for the week's work, the women making all 
things ready for the wash-tub, and the children all hilarity. When I was 



84 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

about six years old my father moved into Dutchess county, New York, about 
one mile from the west line of Connecticut. The Stamp Act had been 
passed and repealed before this time, but a number of other oppressive laws 
had been passed. There was at that time very little paper made in America, 
and no contract, even to a note of hand, could be collected, or was lawful, 
unless written on stamped paper, sent from England. Boston was the cen- 
ter-place of opposition to these oppressions, and regular troops were sent 
there to enforce these laws. Under these circumstances, the patriotic 
neighborhood where my father resided, formed into a minute company, to 
be ready at all times, when called for in defence of their country. 

Soon after the battle of Bunker Hill my father was called to the City of 
New York, received a captain's commission to enlist a company for one year; 
from the following first of April. He did so, and rendezvoused with his 
company on Constitution Island, opposite West Point, for the purpose of 
fortifying that place, so as to stop navigation on the Hudson, of British ship- 
ping going up to the head of navigation, which would leave but 50 or 60 
miles of land for an army to cross to the head of Lake Champlain. It was 
so important to fortify West Point and the Highlands, that a number of the 
officers took their sons (under 14 years) for waiters, that all the able-bodied 
men might serve. My father took me only in my eleventh year. I served 
only ten months. On the 1st of April. 1777, all my father's resources were 
spent, and he involved in debt, In 1777, the British sent an army from 
New York up the Hudson and another from Montreal to meet at Albany. 
The one from the south took Fort Montgomery. Had the British succeeded 
in their plans of cutting off the New England States from the Southern, the 
declaration of '76 would have continued to be treated with contempt. Soon 
after, my father became captain of a company of volunteers, raised to stop 
the progress of Burgoyne. The company joined Gates' army at Stillwater, 
Saratoga county, where they stayed until the surrender of the British army. 
My father was so well suited with the land in Stillwater, he bargained for 
a farm, about three miles from where the battles were fought, and he and 
myself went there in March, prepared for and put in some grain, and a gar- 
den, and he returned for the family. 

It being a wooded country, and but little of the farm cleared, in the spring a 
number of the bodies of men were found. They had been buried in so shal- 
low a grave, the covering so light, the wolves had dug them up and par- 
tially devoured them. Some parts of the battles had been fought in the 
woods. I think it was the next winter a negro, sent to the woods with his 
axe to chop trees, not returning, he was searched for, and it was found he 
had fought a large number of wolves, killed two with his axe, but they were 
too numerous and had killed and partly eaten him. Wolves were so plenty 
sheep could be kept only by shutting them in a close pen at night. 

My father was a well-read man and had as good an education as any at 
that period, who had not enjoyed collegiate advantages. Was with General 
Putnam (then Major) in two campaigns of the French war, and was within 
a few feet of him when the Indians captured him. My father was a whig, 
and lived in a neighborhood of whigs. I, of course, heard much said about 
the whig and tory parties in the British parliament, and although a 
boy, I turned to an old English dictionary to find the meaning of those 
words so closely connected with the serious and fearful anxieties that ap- 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 85 

peared on the countenances of the more aged. The original meaning of 
whig 1 found to be whey, buttermilk, or small beer, and was first applied 

to those in Scot lam 1 who held their meetings in the fields, their E 1 being 

buttermilk: afterwards a nickname given those who opposed the court ami 
high church party in the times of King Ch irles ami James II. The word 
tory was used in Ireland to signify robbers, murderers, who stood outlawed 
for their crimes: subsequently a name given the opulent, overbearing, eccle- 
siastical and political aristocracy of the British Government. I, of course, 
venerated the whig party, and abhorred the other. There was another 
source from which 1 learned much. .\t thai time there was published a 
small weekly newspaper, under the heading Common Sense, several arti- 
cles appeared, giving a very (dear and discriminating view of the principles 
of the British Government and contrasting them with a republican. From 
these sources, I formed the opinions which have been my polar star through 
my three score year- and ten. Great honors have been bestowed on the 
patriot soldiers of the Revolution; but the mothers, wives and daughters of 
those noble men bore their full share of the sufferings of those times, and 
are equally with them entitled to the gratitude of the present and future 
generations. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

50. i. Increase W. Child, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., X. Y., Oct. 9, 
1787, m. Jan 12, 1810. Desire Frink. 

51. ii. Esther Child, b. in Greenfield. X. Y. Dec. 27, 1790, d. July 24 
1796. 

52. iii. Olive Child, b. in Greenfield, X. Y , Jan. 21, 1795, d young. 

53. iv. William Child, b. in Greenfield, X. Y., Jan. 4, 1798, in. Feb. 5. 
1820. Susan Deake. 

54. v. Priscilla Child, b. in Greenfield, X. Y., Sep. 3, 1800, m. Mr. 
Petit, d. April 1, 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

50. i. Dr. Increase W. Child, eldest child and son of 
Judge Salmon and Olive Rose Child, b. in Greenfield, N. Y., 
Oct. 9, 1787, m. Jan. 12, 1810, Desire Frink, dau. of Colonel 
Henry Frink of Milton. Saratoga Co., N". Y. She was b. Feb. 
10, 1791, d. Sep. 23, 1821. He d. in Fayette, Seneca Co., N.T., 
Feb. 1, 1816. 

As a physician and surgeon, Dr. Child was eminent not only 
in Saratoga county, for many years his field of practice, but 
attained a high standing in the state. His medical associates 
held him in great esteem for his personal qualities as well as 
superior skill in his profession. His services as a lecturer in 
his profession were often sought and obtained by the medical 
colleges in the country, and his opinions in critical cases were 
deferred to by the medical fraternity. His private virtues se- 
cured for him the confidence of all classes, and gave him com- 



S6 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



manding influence. His patrons were not altogether among 
the rich and influential; the humble dwellings of the poor and 
lowly were never shunned by Dr. Child. Endowed by nature 
with noble and generous feelings, expanded and deepened by 
the force of a Christian faith, he was drawn to the needy, on 
whom he freely expended his counsels and aid without fee or 
reward. As a public benefactor, he early espoused the tem- 
perance reform, and from his personal popularity, reclaimed 
some from habits of intemperance, and saved many by his per- 
suasions and his methods for prescribing for his patients from 
falling into these habits. Seldom, if ever, did he prescribe 
alcoholic liquors as a tonic. 

Mrs. Child was scarcely less popular among her extensive 
acquaintances and her husband's patients. By nature and cul- 
ture, she was a lady of great personal attractions. Her quali- 
ties of heart were among her greatest charms. She seems to 
have been the counterpart of her noble husband. One of her 
daughters says of her, "by her ladylike qualities and kind- 
ness of heart she gained many friends. Many a time have I 
seen her fill a basket with delicacies, provisions and clothing 
for poor families, the patients of my father, to be conveyed by 
him in his round of visits to their humble abodes." In speak- 
ing of her mother, in the portrayal of her excellencies, another 
daughter says, "I cannot say enough in her praise." And at 
her burial, her clergyman speaks of her as embodying all that 
is lovely and attractive. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

55. i. Henry Frink Child, b.in Milton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., Oct. 25, 1811. 

56. ii. Salmon Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1812, m. Catharine 
Lewis. 

57. iii. Marion Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., March 2, 1814, ra. Adam 
Wynkoop 

58. iv. Caroline Child, b. in Milton. X. Y., Sep. 7, 1815, m. Dan'l Barrett. 

59. v. Hannah Frink Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Dec. 17, 1816, in. Israel 
Howe. , 

60. vi. Olive Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., June 1, 1818, d. Aug. 1854, unm. 

61. vii. Benjamin R. Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1819, m. Catha- 
rine Cole. 

62. viii. Mary Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Aug. 8, 1821, lives with Mrs. 
Barret at Fairfax, C. H., Ya. unmarried. 

63. ix. Sarah Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Jan. 27, 1823, m. Nov. 2, 1850, 
Paris Pet tit 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 87 

64. x. .Martha Child, b. in Milton, X. V., June. "20, 1825. in. Nov, 25, 
1848. Andrew Van Gieson 

65. xi. Mllinda Child, b. in Milton, X. V.. May 7. 1827, m. Nov. 2, 
1851, Bernard M Madden 

66. xii. Frances Prink Child. I>. in Milton, X. V.. .Jan. 18. 1829, in. 
Nov. 17, 1847. William dale-. 

67. xiii. Desire Prink Child, b. in Milton, X. Y., Dee. 5, 1830, in. Dan'] 
Barrett, her brother-in-law, at Falls Church, Fairfax Co., Va. 

68. xiv. Isaac Frink Child, b. in Milton, X. V.. June 21. 1S32. in. Oct. 
11, 1862, Jennie E. Kellogg. 

69. xv. Increase \Y. Child. Jr., b. in Milton, X. Y , Nov. 12. 1835, d. 
1872. \Yas a merchant in New York city, unmarried. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

55. i. Hex'ry Feixk Child, eldest child of Dr. Increase W. 
and Olive Kose Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1811. was 
a phvsician, and established himself in Poughkeepsie, X. Y., 
where he had an extensive practice ; was popular as a man, and 
acquired a high reputation in his profession. He died Sept. 
1871, much lamented by his friends and acquaintances. He 
never married. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

56. ii. Salmox* Child, second child and son of Dr. Increase 
W. and Olive Rose Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1812, 
in. Catharine Lewis of Ontario Co., N. Y., moved to Virginia, 
purchased a large tract of land six miles from Georgetown, and 
became a successful planter. He died Dec. 29, I860, leaving 
a wife, but no children. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

57. iii. Marion Child, eldest dau. and third child of Dr. 
Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, IS". Y., 
March 2, IS 14, m. Adam Wynkoop, a wealthy farmer of Hope- 
well, Ontario Co., N. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

70. i. Cara C. Wynkoop. 

71. ii. Desire F. Wyxkoop. 

72. iii. John Wynkoop. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

58. iv. Caroline Child, second dau. and fourth child of Dr. 
Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. Sep. 7, 1815. She had 
a thorough education. Started a young ladies' seminary in ' 
Dutchess Co., N. Y., of which she was for some years principal. 



88 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

She married Daniel Barrett in that county, and they removed 
to Fairfax Co., Va. Mr. Barrett became an extensive planter. 
Mrs. Barrett died in 1862. Mr. Barrett married, second, Desire 
Frink Child, sister of his first wife. There were no children 
by this marriage. He died in 1874. Mr. Barrett's house was 
often the headquarters of Gren. McClellan and staff. Mrs. Bar- 
rett resides at Fairfax, C. H., Ya. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children of Caroline Child and Daniel Barrett: 

73. i. Henry Barrett, 

74. ii. Samuel Barrett. 

75. iii. Caroline Barrett. 

76. iv. Katharine Barrett. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

59. v. Hannah Frink Child, third dau. and fifth child of 
Dr. Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., 
Dec. 17, 1816, in. Israel Howe of Gorham, Ontario Co., N. Y.; 
removed to Sanford, Broome Co., N. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

77. i. Philo Howe, b. in Gorham, Ontario Co., N. Y , Feb. 13, 1843, m. 
Dec. 25, 1872, Delia Baker. 

78. ii. Emma P. Howe, b. in Gorham, Ontario Co., N. Y., Oct. 21, 1844, 
m. Aug. 1862, Jno. E. Freleigh, reside in Floyd Co., Iowa. 

79. iii. Alvin Rush Howe, b. in Gorham, Ontario Co., N. Y., April 30, 
1847, m. May 11, 1870, Patience A. Seward. 

80. iv. Anne D. Howe, b. in Gorham, Ontario Co., N. Y., Aug. 7, 1851; 
is a teacher in a ladies' school at Dobb's Ferry, on the Hudson river. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

61. vii. Benjamin E. Child, seventh child of Dr. Increase 
W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1819, 
m. Catharine Cole, dau. of Judge Cole, of New York City. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

81. i. Henry Child. 

82. ii. Henrietta Child. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

63. ix. Sarah H. Child, sixth dau. and ninth child of Dr. 
Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, N. Y, Jan. 
27, 1823, m. Nov. 2, 1850, Paris Pettit, son of William Eiley 
and Priscilla Child Pettit, (the mother of Paris P. was dau. 
of Judge Salmon Child,) by Eev. John J. Stearns, in Gor- 
ham, Ontario Co., N. Y. They reside at Fort Atkinson, Jeffer- 
son countv, Wis. Mrs. Pettit is by profession a teacher. 



AND Ills DESCENDANTS. 89 

| Xini Ii Generation. ] Children : 

S3, i. Agnes Child Pettit, b. in Troy, Wis.. Aug. L9, L853, d. i pril 22, 
1853. 

84. ii. Marion Cornelia Pettit, b. in Troy, Wis., April 15, 1851 

85. iii. Fannie Frink Pettit, b. in Troy, Wis., March !>. 1856. 

86. iv. Alice Smith Pettit, b. in Troy, Wis., June 3, 1858, d. Nov. 5, 1863. 

87. v. Henry Paris Pettit, b. in Troy, Wis., July 25, 1862. 

[Eighth General ion. J 

64. x. Martha Child, seventh dau. and tenth child of Dr. 
Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, N. Y, Juno 
2, 1S25, m. Nov. 2, 1848, Andrew VanGHeson, son of John and 
Cynthia Bush Van Ofieson of Lodi, Washtenaw Co., Michigan, 
by Eev. Mr. Tozer, in Fayette N. Y. Mr. Yan G. is a farmer, 
Mrs. Yan G. is a teacher. They Reside in Beloit, Rock Co., Wis. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

88. i. Fred L. Van Gibson, b. Feb. 6, 1854, in Broome Co., N. Y. 

89. ii. Charles Bush Van Gieson, b. March 25, I860, in Rock Co., Wis. 

90. iii. Clara Bell Van Gieson, b. Nov. 7, 1866, in Rock Co., W T is. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

65. xi. Mellnda Frink Child, eighth dau. and eleventh 
child of Dr. Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, 
N. Y, May 7, 1827, m. Nov. 2, 1851, Bernard M. Madden of 
Seneca Co., N. Y., now residents in Elkhorn, Walworth Co., 
Wis. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

91. i. Frances Lillian C. Madden, b. in Elkhorn, Wis., Jan. 15, 1854. She 
is principal of the high school in Elkhorn. 

92. ii. Mary Child Madden, b. in Elkhorn, Wis., July 10, 1856 

93. iii. Isaac Child Madden, b. in Elkhorn, Wis., Oct, 13, 1860. Is a 
law student. 

94. iv. Melinda Child Madden, b. in Elkhorn, Wis., May 22, 1863. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

66. xii. Frances Frink Child, ninth dau. and twelfth child 
of Dr. Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, N. Y, 
Jan. 18, 1829, ra. Nov. 17, 1847, William Gates, son of Cyrus 
and Jane Wycoff Gates of La Crosse, Wis., by Rev. John G 
Stearns. Reside in Beloit, Wis. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

95. i. Adelbert Gates, b. in Tattle, Rock Co., Wis., June 27, 1849, d. 
by railroad accident Aug. 27, 1877. 

96. ii. Jennie Gates, b. in Tuttle, Rock Co., Wis., July 3, 1851. 

97. iii. Harry Elwood Gates, b. in Tuttle, Rock Co., Wis., Apr. 18,1857, 

G 



90 BENJAMIN CHILD OF BOXBURY, MASS. 

98. iv. Oscar Elmore Gates, b. in Tuttle, Rock Co., Wis., Dec. 29, 1859, 
d. Oct. 31, I860. 

99. v. Edna S. Gates, b in Tuttle, Rock Co., Wis , Jan. 14, 1869. 

100. vi. Lois C. Gates, b. in Tuttle, Rock Co., Wis., Sep. 14, 1870. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

68. xiv. Isaac Frink Child, fourth son and fourteenth 
child of Dr. Increase W. and Desire Frink Child, b. in Milton, 
N. Y., Jan. 21, 1832, m. Oct. 10, 1862, by Jack Lynes, Esq., 
Jennie E. Kellogg, dau. of Helmont and Electa Washburn Kel- 
logg of New Bloomfield, Callaway Co., Mo. 

Mr. Child was a dry goods merchant at Dryersburg, Ten- 
nessee. His death has occurred but recently, (March 9, 1879,) 
and was very sudden. Mrs. Child writes us that " He died 
of a congestive chill fever. A few days previous to his 
death, while in health, he received your letter asking for 
his family record, when he expressed himself greatly pleased 
at the prospect of a genealogy of the Child family, and had 
set apart the very day of his death for preparing his family 
record," the melancholy duty falling upon his wife, which she 
has faithfully performed. Mr. Child was popular as a citizen 
in Dryersburg, once Mayor of the city, and esteemed for his 
probity, magnanimity and generosity. He removed to Tennes- 
see in 1859, and through the sectional strife adhered to the old 
flag of the Union, affording ample proof that the blood of his 
Puritan ancestry was running in his veins not less warmly than 
in the veins of the fathers in the days of the Revolution. 
rNinth Generation.] Children: 

101. i. Madge Child, b. Oct. 3, 1864.. 

102. ii. Gerold Child, b. Aug. 18, 1865. 

103. iii. Gretchen Child, b. March 15, 1868. 

104. iv. Stamford Child, b. Oct. 5, 1870. 

105. v. Guy Child, b. June 6, 1873. 

106. vi. May Tenth Child, b. May 10, 1875. 

107. vii. Mac Child, b. April 25, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

53. iv. William Child, second son and fourth child of 
Judge Salmon and Olive Rose Child, was b. in Greenfield, 
Saratoga Co., N. Y., Jan. 4, 1798, m. Feb. 5, 1820, to Susan 
Deake. She was b. Dec. 25, 1798. On the 14th of May, 1861, 
Mr. Child writes to his cousin Olive, dau. of Dr. Increase W. 
Child, sending to her a copy of the family record from the old 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 91 

family Bible, — "Wm, Child, b. Jan. 4, 1T9S, m. to Susan 
Deake Feb. 5, 1820, and are this day living joyfully together, 
through the mere}' of God, May 14, 1861." 

Mi-. William Child was the youngest son, and the home son, until 
the spring of 1836, when he moved to Gorham, Ontario county, 
where he resided some eleven years. In 1847, he again moved 
with his family to Walworth county, Wis., and here remained 
until his death. His children were born in Greenfield, Saratoga 
county, N. Y. In stature live feet ten inches, like his mother's 
family (the Rose) he was spare, but with the Child complexion 
and eyes. Fragile in health in early years, he used to say of 
himself that, "he grew up a puny, petted and spoiled child," 
owing some unusual indulgence to the frequent absence from 
home upon public affairs of his father, Judge Child. He was 
kind and tender in heart, impulsive, and sometimes irritable in 
temper, but never retaining ill-will. Of hunting and fishing, he 
was passionately fond, and always loved his dog and gun. An 
admirer of Burns and Shakespeare, whom he read effectively, 
and thus instructed and entertained his children in the long 
winter evenings ; with his family, he shared all his pursuits and 
pleasures in a marked degree. Indeed, he attributed his con- 
version to the lovely christian life and daily prayers of his wife 
though he had an inheritance of godliness. After his removal 
to the west, he became an earnest Christian worker. Linked with 
the Baptist denomination, he served almost gratuitously the 
"Wisconsin Baptist State Missionary Convention," for some time? 
in a quiet and effective manner, collecting and dispensing funds' 
and awakening a strong sympathy between the different Baptist 
churches in the State. With equal enthusiasm he regarded, the 
causes of education and politics. The last outside activities of 
this fond husband and wife, w T ere ministrations in the household 
of a poor German family, who were all sick. Mrs. Child caught 
the fever, and her death from it occurred on the 17th of April, 
1865 ; two days previous President Lincoln had been assassi- 
nated. Mr. Child was an ardent admirer of President Lincoln, 
and the shock of these two deaths was too severe. With no 
organic disease, he succumbed on the 24th of the same month. 
Walking from the fire to his bed, he lay down, waved his hand 
to his son James standing near, and smiling said, " Good-bye." 
These incidents are related by his son, Rev. Increase Child. 



92 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

108 i. James Child, b. Aug. 23, 1823, m. Sep. 15,1847, Esther Dinsmore. 

109. ii. Olive Child, b. May 6, 1825, m. Feb. 14, 1850, Alfred Payne. 

110. iii. Increase Child, b. Dec. 10, 1827, m June 5, 1850, Artimesia 
Lincoln, in. 2d Sept. 2, 1875, Adaline Flagg. 

111. iv. Dexter Child, b. Nov. 7, 1829, d. May 3, 1852, beloved by all 
who knew him. 

112 v. Abbey Child, b. May 4, 1836, m. Nov. 12, 1856, to Cyrus S. Phil- 
lips. 

[Eighth Generation J 

108. i. James Child, first child of William and Susan 
Deake Child, b. Aug. 23,1823, m. Sep. 15, 1847, Esther Dins- 
more. She was b. March 4, 1827. They reside in East Troy, 
Walworth Co., Wis. 

[Ninth Generation ] Children : 

113. i. Melzar Child, b. Aug. 26, 1848, d, Sep. 29, 1849. 

114. ii. Huldah Child, b April 6, 1850, in. T. H. Conklin. She d. Nov. 
29, 1872. 

115. iii. Susan Child, b. March 7, 1852, d. April 22, 1869. 

116. iv. William Child, b. Feb. 14, 1854, d. Oct. 3, 1855. 

117. v. William Child, 2d, b. June 27, 1856. 

11*8. vi. Henry Dexter Child, b. Oct. 25, 1858, d. Sep. 1, 1866. 

119. vii. Emma Child, b. March 17, 1861. 

120. viii. Chauncey Child, b. May 6, 1863, d. Sep. 5, 1864. 

121. ix. Abbey L. Child, b. Sep. 9. 1864. 

122. x. Esther M. Child, b. Feb. 13, 1869, d. Sep. 21, 1869. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

109. ii. Olive Child, eldest dau. and second child of William 
and Susan Deake Child, b. in Milton N. Y., May 6, 1825, m. 
Feb. 14, 1850, at Spring Prairie, Wis., Alfred Payne of Piqua, O., 
a portrait and landscape painter. They reside in Hinsdale, 111. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

123. i. Susan Payne, b. in Hinsdale, 111., Feb. 23, 1851, is a teacher of 
English Literature in the Latin High School, Chicago, 111. 

124. ii. Emma Payne, b. in Hinsdale, 111* May 10, 1853, m. April 9, 1874, 
Charles E. Erskine, of the firm of Chase & Co., manf. of threshing machines 
and portable furnaces. 

125. iii. Henry Payne, b. in Hinsdale, 111., Oct. 23, 1855, is a teacher in 
Hinsdale, 111. 

126. iv. William Child Payne, b. in Hinsdale, 111., July 28, 1861. 

127. v. Elsie Payne, b. in Hinsdale, 111., April 27, 1864. 

128. vi. Bertha Payne, b. in Hinsdale, 111., January 20, 1867. 



AXI) His DESCENDANTS. !»3 

[ Ninth Generation.] 

124. ii. Emma Payne, second dau. and second child of Olive 
Child and Alfred Payne, b. in Hinsdale. 111., May 10, 1853, m- 
April 9, 1874, Charles E. Erskine. 

[Tenth Generation.] Child: 
129. i. Alfred M. Erskine, b. June 12, 1875. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

110. iii. Rev. Increase Child, second son and third child of 
William and Susan Deake Child, b. Dec. 10, 1827, m. 1st Arti- 
mesia Lincoln, June 5, 1850. She was b. Dec. 31, 1829, d. June 
21, 1875 : m. 2nd Sept. 2, 1875, Adaline Flagg. She was b. 
Nov. 6, 1838. 

Rev. Mr. Child is an inheritor from his paternal and mater- 
nal ancestry, of that "mercy unto thousands of them that love 
Me and keep my Commandments," and lives to perpetuate the 
promise to future generations. The wonderful transmission of 
characteristics peculiar to different families, has found in him a 
dual manifestation. In early life he seemed to partake entirely 
of the mental features of his mother's family ; with advancing 
years these were largely overgrown by the Child qualities. In 
the work of the ministry. Mr. Child has found his sphere, and 
by it has been compelled to conquer that vis inertia which is 
thought to be a Child characteristic, often hindering them from 
being; and doing all they might Chastened by afflictions, he is 
the true consoler of the sorrowing; era vine; knowledge, he is fit- 
ted to instruct and elevate others : loving his Master, he labors 
untiringly to win his flock into the fold of the good Shepherd. 
Quick in his sympathies, he has been earnest in his efforts to 
aid in this memorial work of a noble ancestry. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

130. i. Heney Lincoln Child, b. Aug. 10, 1851, d. Feb. 11, 1852. 

131. ii. Mary Lincoln Child, b. March IS. 1854. d. July S. 1854. 

132. iii. Ellen Lovisa Child, b. June 20, 1855, m. Feb. 6, 1875, J. Clin- 
ton Ransom. 

133. iv. Julia L. Child, b. Feburary 1. 1858, d. June 11, 1861. 

134. v. Charles M. Child, b. April 11. 1866, d. April 13, 1866. 

135. vi. Clement Dexter Child, b. May 15, 1868. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

112. v. Abbey Child, second dau. and fifth child of William 
and Susan Deake Child, b. May 4, 1836, m. Nov. 12. 1S56. Cyrus 



94 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBUEY, MASS. 

S. Phillips. He was b. April 18, 1828. Resides in Tecumseh, 
Johnson Co., Nebraska. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

136. i. Lottie Phillips, b. Dec. 15, 1868. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

45. v. Mark Anthony Child, third son and fifth child of 
Increase and Olive Pease Child, b. in Stillwater, Saratoga Co., 
N. Y„ May 10, 1771, d. in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., Feb. 1843, 
m. Hannah Benedict, Dec. 8, 1793. She was b. Jan. 1, 1774, 
d. 1818 ; m. 2nd about 1819, Submit Peacock. Had eleven 
children by the first wife, and five by the second. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

137. i. Mary Child, b. February 5, 1795, d. same day. 

138. ii. Alfred Bosworth Child, b, in Greenfield, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1796. 
m. March 19, 1817, Polly Barber. 

139. iii. Ephralm Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., May 15, 1798, m. about 1819, 
Margaret Van Tassel. 

140. iv. John Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Jan. 18, 1800, m. Jan. 18, 1824, 
Betsey Harris. 

141. v. Betsey Child, b. Sept. 5, 1802, m. Wm. Harris, 1823. 

142. vi. Paulina Child, b. Nov. 8, 1803. m. Walter Hewitt. 

143. vii. Pamelia Child, b. Aug. 28, 1804, m. Lyman Wooster, March 9, 
1850. 

144. viii. Rensselaer Child, b. Oct. 17, 1809, m. Charlotte Burnham, 
Sept. 1, 1831. 

145. ix. Hannah Child, b. Oct.' 16, 1810, m. Amos H. Burnham, 1834. 

146. x. Emeline Child, b. Jan. 19, 1815, m. Jan. 27, 1835, Alanson Bar- 
ber, m. 2nd, March 11, 1862, Amos Burnham. 

147. xi. Mark Anthony Child, Jr., b. Jan. 13, 1817, m. 1837, Lydia Rob- 
inson. 

[By second Marriage] : 

148. xii. Polly B. Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Nov. 9, 1820, m. May 10, 
1838, Charles Porter Bennett. 

149. xiii. Harriet Child, b. 1823, m. James Purdy who lives in Ionia> 
Mich, she d. 1871. 

150. xiv. Walter Child, d. at 17 years. 

151. xv. Henrietta Child, m. Edmund Robinson. 

152. xvi. Charlotte Child, b. Nov. 18, 1833, m. Nov. 17,1864, Mr. Riddle. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

138. ii. Alfred Bosworth Child, second child and first son 
of Mark Anthony and Hannah Benedict Child, b. in the town 
of Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., Nov. 19, 1796, m. March 19 
1817, Polly Barber who was b. March 30, 1799. She was the 
daughter of Tchabod and Anne Deake Barber. He died Dec. 22, 
1852. They had twelve children. 



AX 1> BIS DESCENDANTS. 95 

The somewhat eventful history of Mr. Alfred Bosworth 
Child, which we here annex, is furnished by one of his sons, 
Warren Gould Child, who passed through many of the experi- 
ences of the father, and has much of his zeal for the Mormon 
faith : 

Alfred Bosworth Child, my father, was married to Polly, daughter of 
Iehabod and Anne Deake Barber. Tie soon after his marriage moved to 
the town of Morristown, St. Lawrence county. New York, where lie pur- 
chased a small farm, of which he cleared and cultivated some thirty acres, 
and through economy and industry acquired a limited amount of property. 
It was here, in the year 1837, that the principles of Mormonism were sounded 
in his ears, and after a careful investigation of the same he embraced Mor- 
monism, sold his farm and moved West to Kirtland, Ohio. Staying there 
but a few months, he then left with his family for Caldwell county, Missouri, 
where he arrived in the fall of the same year having made the entire journey 
with only one team consisting of two horses. 

The family had been settled upon a farm purchased by them, when the 
persecutions commenced upon the Mormons. We were compelled to leave 
in th.> following spring. The farm and one horse were taken and confiscat- 
ed by the mob. 

He next settled in Lee county, Iowa, in the year 1840, taking up and im- 
proving a farm on what was known as the half breed track, remaining there 
about seven years. In 1841, he accepted the position of postmaster at what 
is known as Spring Prairie post office, which position he held as long as he 
remained in the county, which he left through the persecutions of the Mor- 
mon people, in 1847. He then started further West, travelling through that 
portion of the state which at that time was inhabited by the Pottowattamie 
Indians. He settled again at or near where Council Bluffs City, Iowa, now 
stands, taking up and improving another farm on which he lived about 
five years. 

Salt Lake Valley having been selected as a last resort for the more peace- 
ful settlement of the Mormon people, he again, now the fourth time, left 
all he had. On the 8th day of July, 1852, he started for Salt Lake Valley, 
where he arrived on the first day of the following October, having travelled 
in wagons drawn by oxen and cows over one thousand miles across uninhab- 
ited desert and mountainous country. On the 22nd day of the next Decem- 
ber he died of disease of the lungs, brought on through exposure and the 
hardships of his journeyings. His age was 56 years, .1 mo. and 7 days. He 
left a wife with four sons and three daughters. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

153. i. Ichabod Child, b. April 20, 1818, d. young. 

154. ii. Mary Child, b. March 15, 1819, d. young. 

155. iii. Joseph Child, b. January 19, 1820, d. young. 

156. iv. Polly Axx Child, b. July 20, 1822, m. P. E. Richardson. 

157. v. Mark Alfred Child, b. October 19, 1823, d. unmarried. 

Mark Alfred Child enlisted in the TJ. S. Army at Fort Leaven- 
worth, Mo., in 1844. He marched overland to Mexico as one of 



96 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Gen. Kearney's staff, which position he held during the war with 
Mexico, where he received a lance wound in the neck, and a 
ball wound in the instep, which disabled him from active service. 
At the close of the war he was discharged with a pension. Af- 
ter recovering from his wounds he went to Upper California ; 
was there in the great gold excitement, where he engaged in the 
ranching business, was very successful for a time, when the In- 
dians made a raid on his stock driving it off. He with a posse 
went in pursuit, in which they were ambushed in a canon and 
their entire party killed. 

158. vi. Myron Barber Child. 1.. Nov. 25, 1825, m. Feb. 14. 1846, Eme- 
line Elmer 

159. vii. Hannah Polina Child, b. Jan. 24, 1828, m. March 26, 1846, 
William Elmer. 

160. viii. John Lonson Child, b. Oct. 26. 1830. m. Jan. 24, 1S50, Eliza 
Curtiss. 

161. ix. Phebe Wooster Child, b. Jan. 17. 1883, m. May 14, 1848, C. 
Richardson. 

162. x. Warren Gould Child, b. Feb. 21, 1835, m. Jan. 6. 1853, Hannah 
A. Wilder. 

163. xi. Orville Rensselaer Child, b. Oct. 11, 1838, m. Feb. 13, 1859, 
TJrinda Rawson. 

164. xii Asa Thomas Child, b July 28, 1841, d. May 3, 1848. Lived and 
died in Lee county, Iowa . 

[Eighth Generation..] 

156. iv. Polly Ann Child, second dau., and fourth child of 
Alfred Bosworth and Polly Barber Child, b. July 20, 1822, m- 
R E. Richardson about 1847. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

165. i. Alfred Bosworth Richardson, b. in Pottawottamie Co., Iowa, 
Feb. 18. 1848, d. May 16, 1848. 

166 ii. Warren Child Bosworth Richardson, b. May 4. 1850, m. about 
1871, Olive E. Singleton. 

167. iii. Ebenezer Richardson, b. Oct. 11. 1852, m. about 1877, Miss 
Singleton. 

168. iv. Angeline Richardson, b. Aug. 21, 1857, in Ogden City, U. Ter., 
m. S. Draney. 

169. v. Levi Richardson, b. Oct. 16. 1860, in Ogden City, U. Ter. 

170. vi. Ora-ille Richardson. Vi. July 11, 1862, m Ogden City, U. Ter., 
d. January 8. 1865. 

[Ninth Generation ] 

166. ii. Warren Child Bosworth Richardson, second 
child of Polly Ann Child and R E. Richardson, b. May 4, 1850, 
m. Olive E. Singleton, about 1871. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 97 

I'l'ini h ( feneration.] Children : 

171. i. Olive Richardson, 1>. July IT. 1872. 

172. ii. Harriet W. Richardson, b. November 7, 1874. 

173. iii. Thomas E Richardson, b. Augusl 25, 1876. 

174. iv. Annie Richardson, b. April 29, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

167. iii. Ebexezer Richardson, third child of Polly Ann 
Child and R E. Richardson, b. Oct. 11, 1852, m. about 1877, 
Miss Singleton. Lives in Eldorado Co., Cal. 

[Tenth Generation.] Child: 

175. i. Emma Erixda Richardson, b. October 25, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

168. iv. Angeline Richardson, fourth child of Polly Ann 
Child and R. E. Richardson, b. Aug. 21, 1857, m. S. Draney. 
Residence, Ogden City, Utah. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

176. i. Samuel E. Draney, b. August 9, 1874. 

177. ii. John H. Draney, b, August 5, 1876. 

178. iii. Joseph 0. Draney, 1>. August 6, 1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

158. vi. Myron Barber Child, sixth child of Alfred Bos- 
worth and Polly Barber Child, b. Nov. 25, 1825, m, Feb. 14, 
1846, Emeline Elmer, who was b. July 27, 1828, in Chittenden 
county, Vt. 

Wan-en C. Child writes of M. B. Child : 

31. B. Child, now in his 54th year, crossed the plains to Utah in 1850. and 
settled in or near Ogden. Is a farmer and a prominent citizen ; has held var- 
ious offices of profit and trust, and, like all bearing the name of Child, with 
whom we have formed any acquaintance, stands high and unblemished in 
society. Is in stature of medium height, active and jovial, and rather inclin- 
ed to be corpulent. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

179. i. William Warren Child, b. in Lee county, Iowa, Feb. 26, 1848, 
m 1868, Jennette Fife. 

180. ii. Asa Lonson Child, b in Lee county, Iowa, Dec. 29, 1849, num. 

181. iii. Alfred Bosworth Child, b. in Pottawattamie county, Iowa. 
July 8, 1852, m. S. J. Stonebraker. 

182. iv. Myron Barber Child, b. in Pottawattamie county, Iowa, July 3, 
1854, d. Nov. 4, 1854. 

183. v. Mark Anthony Child, b. in Weber county. Utah Ter.. Dec. 22, 
1855. 

184. vi. Emeline Lucina Child, b. in Weber county, Utah Ter., Nov. 21, 
1858, m. Alexander Patterson. 



98 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



185. vii. Cynthia Louisa Child, b. in Weber county, Utah Ter., Dec. 14 
1861. 

186. viii. John Squier Child, b. in Weber countv, Utah Ter.. July 4, 
1863. 

187. ix. Chauncey Child, b. in Weber county, Utah Ter , Aug. 13. 1865, 
d. Aug. 6, 1878. 

188. x. Polly Child, b. in Weber county, Utah Ter., Not. 13, 1868. 

189. xi. Henry Increase Child, b. in Weber county. Utah Ter., Sept, 2. 
1870. 

[By second wife, Serepta Cole] : 

190. xii. Nathan Child, b. Oct. 24, 1865, in Ogden City, Utah Ter. 

191. xiii. Hannah S. Child, b. July 12, 1868, in Ogden City, Utah Ter. 

192. xiv. Myron Barber Child, b. March 7, 1872, in Ogden City, Utah T. 

193. xv. George C. Child, b. July 22, 1877, in Ogden City , Utah Ter. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

179. i. William Warren Child, eldest child of Myron 
Barber and Emeliue Elmer Child, b. in Lee county, Iowa, Feb. 
26, 1848, rn. 186S, Jennette Fife of Ogden City, Utah Ter. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

194. i. William Warren Child, Jr., b. Aug. 31, 1869. d. 1878. 

195. ii. Myron Barber Child, b. Sept. 1, 1869, at Riverdale, Utah. 

196. iii. Nettie Ellen Child, b. April 4, 1873, at Hooper City, Utah. 

197. iv. John Abram Child, b. Nov. 21, 1875, d. Oct. 6, 1876, at Hooper 
City, Utah. 

198. v. Mary A. Child, b. 1877. 

****. vi. Louisa Emeline Child, b. June, 1879. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

181. iii. Alfred Bosworth Child, third child of Myron 
Barber and Emeline Elmer Child, b. July 8, 1852, m. Oct. 8, 
1872, S. J. Stonebraker. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

199. i. Alfred Child, b. Sept. 13, 1874. 

200. ii. Nettie Pearl Child, b. Oct. 11, 1876. 

201. iii. Adele Child, b. Nov. 22, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

184. vi. Emeline L. Child, sixth child of Myron Barber 

and Emeline Elmer Child, b. Nov. 21, 1858. m. Alexander 

Patterson, about 1875. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

202. i. Alexander Patterson, Jr., b. Dec. 28, 1876, in Utah Ter. 

203. ii. Lucy E. Patterson, b. May 26, 1878, in Utah Ter. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 99 

[Eighth Generation.] 

159. vii. Hannah Polina Child, seventh child of Alfred 
Bosworth and Polly Barber Child, b. Jan. 24, 1828, m. March 
26, 1846, William Elmer, son of John and Sallie Reque Elmer. 
He was b. Sept, 16, 1820, in Norwich, Vt. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

204. i. John Samuel Elmer, b. Oct. 13, 1847, d. 1858, in Utah Ter. 

205. ii. Mark Alfred Elmer, b. in Pottawatamie Co. Iowa, Dec. 10, 1848, 
m. Minnie Jo>t . 

206. iii. William W. Elmer, b. in Pottawatamie Co. Iowa, Jan. 10, 1850, 
in. A. Hall. 

207. iv. Cynthia Triphenia Elmer, b. in Ogden, U. Ter. Dec. 16, 1852, 
m. John Leavitt. 

208. v. Hannah Paulina Elmer, b. in Ogden, U. Ter. Feb. 13, 1853, d. 
Dec 1856. 

209. vi. Polly Ann Elmer, b. in Ogden. U. Ter. Dec. 6, 1856, m. 1876, 
J. M. Taylor. 

210. vii. Phebe Wooster Elmer, b. in Payson, U. Ter. Sept. 19, 1858, 
m M. Hall, Jun. 

211. viii. Rosabell Elmer, b. in Ogden. IT. Ter. Nov. 1, 1861. 

212. ix. Sarah J. Elmer, b. in Ogden, U. Ter. April 15, 1863. 

213. x. Delecta Ann Elmer, b. in Ogden, U. Ter. Jan. 20, 1866, d. in 
Ogden. 

214. xi. Charles A. Elmer, b. in Ogden, U. Ter. Aug. 1867, d. July 3, 
1870. 

215. xii. Hiram B. Elmer, b in Ogden, U. Ter. 1871, d. 1872. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

205. ii. Mark Alfred Elmer, second child of Hannah Po- 
lina Child and William Elmer, b. Dec. 10, 1818, m. Minnie 
Jost, about IS 72. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

216. i. Minnie M. Elmer, b. Nov. 1873. 

217. ii. Ella M. Elmer, b. July 18, 1875. 
218 iii. John A. Elmer, b. 1877. 

219. iv. Ida A. Elmer, b. 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

206. iii. William W. Elmer, third child of Hannah Polina 
Child and William Elmer, b. in Pottawatamie Co. Iowa, Jan. 
10, 1850, m. A. Hall, about 1878. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

220. i. Martha A. Elmer, b. 1874. 

221. ii. William W. Elmer, Jun. b. 1877. 



100 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

207. iv. Cynthia Triphenia Elmer, fourth child of Han- 
nah Polina Child and William Elmer, b. Dec. 16, 1852, m. 1872, 
John Leavitt. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children. 

222. i. John Leavitt, Jr , b. Dec. 4, 1873. 

223. ii. Adele Leavitt, b. Aug. 22, 1875. 

224. iii. Minnie Leavitt, b. June 27, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

209. vi. Polly Ann Elmer, sixth child of Hannah Polina 

Child and Wra. Elmer, b. Dec. 6, 1856, m. J. M. Taylor, 1876. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

225. i. Elizabeth Taylor, b 1876. 

226. ii. John Taylor, b. July 1, 1879. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

210. vii. Phebe W. Elmer, seventh child of Hannah Polina 
Child and Wm. Elmer, b. Sept. 19, 1858, m. 1S74, M. Hall, Jr. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

227. i. Mark Hall, b. Sept. 1875, d. July 25, 1878. 

228. ii. Charles Hall, b. March 12. 1877, d. March 29, 1877. 

229. iii. John Hall, b. Feb. 12, 1878, d. at birth. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

160. viii. John Lonson Child, eighth child of Alfred Bos- 
worth and Polly Barber Child, b. probably in Greenfield, N. Y. 
Oct. 26, 1830, m. Jan. 21, 1850, Eliza J. Curtiss, dau. of Uriah 
and Phebe Martin Curtiss of Pottawattamie Co. Iowa. She was 
b. April 30, 1830, in Fountain county, Ind. Second m. to 

Mary M. Curtiss. 

[Ninth Generation] Children: 

230. i. Sarah Ann Child, b. in Pottawattamie Co. Iowa, Nov. 8, 1850, d. 
in Ogden City, U. Ter. Jan. 3, 1854. 

231. ii. John Collmbus Child, b. in Pottawattamie Co. Iowa, March 3, 
1852, m. Miss Patterson. 

232. iii. Mary Rosalie Child, b. in Weber Co. U. Ter. Jan. 2, 1854, m. 
July 28, 1869, C. T. Richardson. 

233. iv. Charles Uriah Child, b. in Weber Co. U. Ter., Nov. 2, 1855, m. 
Sept. 10, 1877, Atelia Thompson. 

234. v. Lester Aaron Child, b. in Weber Co. U. Ter., Feb. 8, 1862. 

[By second marriage— Mary M. Curtiss.] 

235. vi. Emma C. Child, b. Nov 2, 1861, m. 1879, A. Bybee. 

236. vii. Phebe Paulina Child, b. April, 1863. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 10J 

[Ninth Generation.] 

231. ii. John Columbus Child, second child and eldest son 
of John Lonson and Eliza J. Curtiss Child, b. in Pottawattamie 
Co. Iowa, March 3, 1852, m. Mary Patterson, Oct. 1875, River- 
dale, Utah. 

[Tenth Generation ] Children: 

237. i. Lettie Child, 1>. Aug. 28, 1870. 

238. ii. Mary Eliza Child, b. May 12, 187s. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

232. iii. Mary Rosalie Child, third child of John Lonson 
and Eliza J. Curtiss Child, b. in Weber Co. Utah Ter.. Jan. 2, 
1854, m. July 28, 1869, to C. T. Richardson. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children : 

239. i. Carrie Richardson, b. July 22, 1874. 

240. ii. Martha Richardson, b. Nov. 26, 1875. 

241 iii. John Richardson, b. April 17, 1877. 

242 iv. Dean Richmond Richardson, b. Dec. 11, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

233. iv. Charles Uriah Child, fourth child of John Lon- 
son and Eliza J. Curtiss Child, b. Nov. 2, 1855, in Weber Co. 
Utah Ter. m. Atelia Thompson, Sept. 10, 1877. 

[Tenth Generation.] Child : 

243. i. Clarence Child, b. June 5, 1878, Riverdale, Utah. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

161. ix. Phebe Wooster Child, ninth child and fourth 
daughter of Alfred Bosworth and Pqjly Barber Child, b. in 
Greenfield, N. Y., Jan. 17, 1833, m. May 14, 1848, C. Richardson 
of Pottawattamie county, Iowa. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

244. i. Amanda Malvina Richardson, b. Aug. 24, 1849, in Pottawatta- 
mie county, Iowa, m. Dudley Chase, August 15, 1868. 

245. ii. Chahles Child Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., May 
23, 1851, m. Oct. 27, 1873. A. Allred. 

246. iii. Franklin Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., May 9, 1853, 
m. Oct. 25, 1875, Louisa L. Shurtleff. 

247. iv. Cornelius Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., Mar. 20, 
1855. 

248. v. Chauncey Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., Apr. 5, 1858. 

249. vi. Alfred Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., Apr. 12, 1861. 

250. vii. John Lyman Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., March 
8, 1863, d. 1866. 

251. viii. Myron Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., Feb. 21, 1865. 



102 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBTJRY, MASS. 

252. ix. William Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., April 1,1867. 

253. x. Ezra Chase Richardson, b. in Ogden City; Utah Ter., May 26, 
1869. 

254. xi. Joseph Richardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., July 1, 1871. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

244. i. Amanda Malvina Eichardson, eldest child of 
Phebe Wooster Child and C. Eichardson, b. Aug. 24, 1849, m. 
Aug. 15, 1868, Dudley Chase. _ Eeside in Ogden City, Utah. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

255. i. Terza Chase, b. Jan. 3. 1870. 

256. ii. Ezra Chase, b. March 10, 1871. 

257. iii. Dudley Chase, b. Dec. 27, 1872. 

258. iv. Loly Ann Chase, b. July 8, 1874. 

259. v. Elsie Chase, b. Dec. 2, 1875. 

260. vi. Nancy A. Chase, b. May 22, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

245. ii. Charles Child Eichardson, second child of Phebe 
Wooster Child and C. Eichardson, b. in. Ogden City, Utah, May 
23, 1851, m. Oct. 27, 1873, A. Allred. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

261. i. Charles D. Richardson, b. Aug. 20, 1874. 

262. ii. Joseph F. Richardson, b. May 29, 1876. 

263. iii. Loly Ann Richardson, b. June 19, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

246. iii. Franklin Eichardson, third child of Phebe Woos- 
ter Child and C. Eichardson, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter. May 
9, 1853, m. Oct. 25, 1875, Louise L. Shurtliff. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

264. i. Phebe L. Richardson, b. Oct. 15, 1876. 

265. ii. Laura A. Richardson, b. Oct. 16, 1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

162. x. Warren Gould Child, tenth child and sixth son of 
Alfred Bosworth and Polly Barber Child, b. in Greenfield, Sara- 
toga county, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1835. His first marriage was on 
Jan. 6, 1853, to Hannah A. Wilder, daughter of Austin and 
Sally M. B. Wilder of Elba. Genesee county, N. Y. His second 
marriage was to Martha Jane Elmer, daughter of David and 
Wealthy Elmer, who was b. March 2, 1838, in the state of 
Indiana. His third marriage was to Jane Bybee, daughter of 
Lee and Nancy Bybee. She d. Jan. 19, 1878. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 103 

We have already intimated that Mr. Warren Gould Child 
is a mormon. While having no sympathy whatever with those 
addicted to such false views of social life and progress, as we 
deem them, it is yet quite in accordance with our plan of doing 
justice to all so far as it is possible, to let each one make his 
own presentation of himself and his family from his own stand- 
point of thought and feeling. It is easy to see from his history 
in Utah, that he is a man of robust constitution, of great phy- 
sical endurance, bold, fearless and of untiring energy; shrewd, 
sagacious, far seeing in business, and persistent and determined 
in his undertakings. The following incidents are from his own 
pen : 

Warren G. Child, now engaged in the mercantile business at Ogden, be- 
sides the various travels with his father's family, has crossed the plains to 
and from Utah, nine different times, five times with ox, cow and horse power. 
Was one of the early settlers of Utah, settling in Ogden City in 1852 ; mar- 
ried Miss Hannah A. Wilder of Elba, N. Y., in the winter of 1853. In the 
spring of '54, accompanied by his wife, he crossed the plains and visited 
their friends in the State of New York. While on the desert our small party 
was attacked by Indians, who, except for the interposition of a friendly In- 
dian actuated by a higher power, would doubtless have massacred the whole 
of our party. Our losses were provisions and other valuables. Having lost 
our provisions, death by starvation strongly presented itself to our view, for 
we were several hundred miles from any settlement. But again, like the 
children of Israel who, through the providence of God, were provided for, 
we too, were met by a party of emigrants of whom we procured sufficient 
food to last us to the nearest settlement. 

We remained with our friends in the East nearly two years and again re- 
turned to Utah, crossing the plains with five wagons drawn by ox and cow 
power. During this tedious journey of three months duration and about 
midway, near the foot of the Black Hills, our second son was given us, five 
hundred miles from the nearest settlement. This almost proved too much 
for my wife and child, being exjjosed to the broiling sun by day and the 
cold mountain breezes by night, with only canvas covers to shelter them, 
but they both survived. We arrived at and settled in Ogden, and engaged 
in farming under many disadvantages, having our crops (raised only by arti- 
ficial irrigation) for several years in succession destroyed by locusts and 
crickets, and for a time famine was at our doors. Flour could only be had 
at the price of twenty to thirty dollars per sack of one hundred pounds, and 
but little at these figures; many were compelled to live on roots, herbs, etc. 
The winter following being of such a severe character, and so much snow 
having fallen, we could obtain no food for our stock (which had been by this 
time reduced to mere skeletons) except that browsed from felled trees, and 
famine throughout our land, with even more serious results seemed immi- 
nent. 



104 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS 



The locusts and pests that did not deposit themselves in the Great Salt 
Lake, left our pastures for others more green, and we were enabled to raise 
bountiful crops which commanded good prices, this being a recruiting point 
for the Overland California and Oregon Emigration. Rich mines of gold," 
silver and lead were discovered in all parts of our territory, demanding more 
easy transit to and through our country. Soon the great Continental and 
other railroads were built, making Ogden the centre of four diffierent rail- 
roads and the junction of the U. P. & S. P. Railroads. 

But a few years ago our country a desert, and pronounced unproductive, 
is now dotted for three hundred miles south and one hundred and fifty miles 
north, with towns "and villages and rich fields of grain, making a pleasant 
and healthful resort for eastern tourists and invalids. The population of 
Utah now numbers some 160,000, three-fourths of which number are that- 
peculiar people called Mormons, with whom the writer of this is numbered. 
He is 44 years old at this writing, 1879, is the father of twenty-five children, 
twenty of whom are now living, four of them are married, he has nine 
grandchildren. His mother, now living, has had near two hundred grand 
and great grandchildren, all of whom are located in LTtah Territory. 

Since my arrival in Utah, my travels have been various. In the spring of 
'58, I was called with a number of others to go north to Salmon River, Idaho, 
where a settlement had been formed by people of our faith, which had been 
beseiged by Indians, who had killed some three or four of their number. 
Upon our arrival we were placed on the defensive, but before any further 
troubles arose we effected a settlement with the " Reds,'' recovering from 
them part of our lost property. Our party then started for their homes 
in the south, and on our way we were attacked by Indians, who killed and 
scalped one of our number. Other and like scenes I have gone through, but 
my scalp has been and is to-day my own property. 

Not wishing to occupy too much space, I do not wish to say more only by 
way of advice, and encouragement to those of our family following after. 
I would have them first learn the characters of their forefathers, and then 
strive with all their powers to keep up the reputation which has been so 
dearly bought and maintained up to the present. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

266. i. Austin Wilder Child, b. in Ogden City, Utah. Ter., Feb. 11, 
1854,, m. Nov. 1, 1872, Mrs. Mary Thompson, of Riverdale, Utah Ter. 

267. ii. Warren Gould Child, Jr. b. in Nebraska, Aug. 15, 1856, m. 
Dec. 27, 1877, Luella Chase. 

268. iii. Hannah Maria Child, b. in Payson, Utah. Ter., Aug. 20, 1858, 
m. Adam Russell of Scotland, 1874. 

269. iv. Rachel Teresa Child, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., Sept. 14, 
1860, m. J. M. Browning. 

270. v. Henry Harrison Child, b. in Ogden City, Jan. 22, 1863. 

271. vi. Heber Thomas Child, b. in Ogden City, May 29, 1865. 

272. vii. Julia Adelaide Child, b. in Ogden City, May 2, 1868. 

273. viii. Nella Dora Child, b in Ogden City, Oct. 11, 1870. 

274. ix. Jesse Child, b in Ogden City, July 22, 1872. 

275. x. Zilpha A. Child, b. in Ogden City, April 12, 1875, d. young. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 105 

[By second marriage — Martha Jane Elmer.] 

276. xi. Rosetta JANE Child, b. in Ogden City, March 26, 1859, m. 
Ambrose Shaw. 

277. xii. Susan W. Child, b. in Ogden City, Sept. 28, 1860. 

278. xiii. Charles A. Child, b. in Ogden City. July 28, 1863. 

279. xiv. Eliza L. Child, b. in Ogden City, Aug. 31,' 1864, d. Feb. 1865. 

280. xv. William W. Child, b. in Ogden City, Oct 14. 1865. 

281. xvi. David J. Child, b. in Ogden City, Aug. 31, 1857, d. March 3, 
1868. 

282. xvii. Sylvia A. Child, b. in Ogden City, April-11, 1869. 

283. xviii. Theodore F. Child, b. in Ogden City. April 24, 1871. 

284. xix. Simon Child, b. in Ogden City, July 24, 1873, ) Twins, 

285. xx. Elliott Child, " " '• ] d. Jan. 1874. 

286. xxi. Lilly Edith Child, b. in Ogden City, April 30, 1876, d. July, 
1878. 

287. xxii. Infant, not named, b. in Ogden City, July 11, 1879. 

[By third marriage — Jane Bybee.] 

288. xxiii. Efpa Bell Child, b. in Ogden City, Jan 6, 1874. 

289. xxiv. Warren Lee Child, b. in Ogden City, Oct. 4, 1875. 

290. xxv. John A. Child, b. in Ogden City. July 5, 1877. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

266. i. Austin Wilder Child, first child of Warren Gould 
and Hannah Wilder Child, b. in Ogden City, Utah Ter., Feb. 
11, 1854, m. Mary Thompson. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

291. i. Ann G. Child, b. Feb. 18, 1876. 

292. ii. Hannah E. Child, b. Nov. 22, 1878. 

293. iii. Austin Child, b. Sept, 8, 1877, d. young. 

294. iv. John Francis Child, b. Feb. 8, 1879. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

267. ii. Warren G-. Child, Jr., second child of Warren Gould 
and Hannah A. Wilder Child, b. Aug. 15, 1856, m. Dec. 27, 
1877, Luelle Chase. 

[Tenth Generation.] Child: 

295. i. Luelle C. Child, b. 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

268. hi. Hannah Maria Child, third child of Warren 
Gould and Hannah Wilder Child, b. Aug. 20, 1858, m. Oct. 
13, 1874, Adam Russell. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

296. i. Hannah E. Russell, b. July 23, 1875, d. Nov. 27, 1876, in River- 
dale. 

297. ii. Warren A. Russell, b. May 31, 1877, in Riverdale. 

298. iii. William Francis Russell, b. April 26, 1879. 

H 



106 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

269. iv. Rachel Child, fourth child of Warren Gould and 
Hannah A. Wilder Child, b. Sept. 1860, m. J. M. Browning. 
[Tenth Generation.] One child (not named), b. 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

163. xi. Orville Rensselaer Child, eleventh child of 
Alfred Bos worth and Polly Barber Child, b. Oct. 11, 1838 r m. 
in Hancock Co., 111., Feb. 13, 1859, Urincla Rawson, dau. of 
Cyrus S. and Eliza Coffin Rawson. She was b. in New York, 
Feb. 8, 1844. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

299. i. Orville Rensselaer Child, Jr., b. Jan. 8, 1860, in Ogden City, 
Utah Ter. 

300. ii. Sarah Ann Child, b. Nov. 14, 1861, in Ogden City. 

301. iii. William Alfred Child, b. April 3, 1864, in Ogden City. 

302. iv. Polly Y. Child, b. May 5, 1866, in Ogden City. 

303. v. Elizabeth Child, b. Aug. 11, 1868. in Ogden City. 

304. vi. Mary Eliza Child, b. April 11, 1872. in Ogden City. 

305. vii. Hannah L. Child, b. March 30, 1874, in Ogden City. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

300. ii. Sarah Ann Child, second child of Orville Rens- 
selaer and Urinda Rawson Child, b. Nov. 14, 1861, m. John 
Dewey. 

[Tenth Generation.] Child; 

306. i. Name not given. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

139. iii. Ephraim Child, third child and second son of Mark 
Anthony and Hannah Benedict Child, b. in Milton, Saratoga 
Co., N. Y., May 15, 1798, m. about 1819, Margaret Van Tassel, 
who was b. Feb. 26, 1799. 

Mr. Child was a man of large stature and great strength. It 
is said he could raise a thirty-two gallon cask of cider from the 
ground, with ease, and drink from the bung. He was a mason 
by trade, and resided at Saratoga Springs, N. Y. He died in 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Feb. 8, 1880, set. 82 yrs. 8 mos. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

307. i. Hannah Lavina Child, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
March 30, 1820, in. Feb. 3, 1848, Isaac Dunwick. 

308. ii. Almon Child, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., March 25, 1822, 
d. date not given. 

309. iii. Emily Child, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co.,N. Y., July 12, 18 25 

310. iv. Marietta Child, b. in Greenfield, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1829, ra. Eli 
Burgess, Jan. 28, 1852. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 107 

311. v. Vesta Ann Child, b. in Greenfield, X. Y., March 4,1836, m. Nov. 
30, 1858, William S. Balch. 

312. vi. Delia Adelaide Child, b. in Greenfield, X. Y., Oct. 21, 1838, 
d. June 13, 1859. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

307. i. Hannah Layina Child, eldest child of Ephraim 
and Margaret Xan Tassel Child, b. in Greenfield, N. Y., March 
30, 1820, m. Feb. 3, 1848, Isaac Dun wick. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

313. i. William Dunwick, b, July 18, 1849. 

314. ii. Maky Louisa Dunwick, b. Aug. 29, 1851. 

315. iii. Frederick Johnson Dunwick, 1>. Jan. 31, 1853. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

310. iv. Marietta Child, fourth child of Ephraim and 
Margaret Van Tassel Child, b. Oct. 12. 1829, m. Jan. 28, 1852. 
Eli Burp-ess. 

« O 

Ninth Generation.] Children: 

316. i. Edward A. Burgess, b. Dec. 5, 1852. 

317. ii. Austin C. Burgess, b. Jan 19, 1856. 

318. iii William E. Burgess, b. June 6, 1859. 

319. iv. Elwood W. Burgess, b. Nov. 3, 1865. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

311. v. Vesta Ann Child, fifth child of Ephraim and Mar- 
garet Van Tassel Child, b. in Greenfield, KY, March 4, 1836, 
m. Nov. 30, 1858, Wm. S. Balch, RR. conductor. Resides at 
Saratoga, N. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

320. i. Carrie Vesta Balch, b. in Saratoga, N. Y., June 24, 1860. 

321. ii. Nellie W. Balch, b. in Saratoga, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1865. 

322. iii. Lillie Emily Balch, b. in Saratoga, N. Y., Mar. 24, 1868, d 
Feb. 8, 1869. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

140. iv. John Child, fourth child of Mark Anthony and 
Hannah Benedict Child, b. in Milton, Saratoga Co., N. Y. Jan. 
18, 1800, m. Jan. 18, 1821, Betsey Harris; m. 2nd, Sarah Kelsey. 

He was a hotel keeper, industrious, and a prominent man 
in Milton, N. Y, and in Rock Co., 111., to which place he re- 
moved from Milton. He was large of stature, — about six feet 
high. — of great physical strength, weighing about two hundred 
pounds. 



108 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

323. i Barney Child, b. in Saratoga Co., Aug. 4, 1821, d. in Rock Co. 
Wis. 1855. 

324. ii. Lewis Child, b. Sept, 23, 1824, in Milton, Saratoga Co. N. Y. ; 
m. first, Rhoda Fraser; second m. Sophronia Conrad. 

325. iii Hannah H. Child, b. Jan. 5, 1828, d. July, 1832. 

326. iv. Emeline B. Child, b. Mar. 21, 1831, unm , resides with her 
mother. 

327. v. Alfred Child, b. April, 1833, in Saratoga Co., N". Y., d. 1849, in 
Wisconsin. 

328. vi. Betsey Child, b. Sept. 17, 1835, d. early. 

329. vii. Betsey Amelta Child, (by second marriage, no date of birth 
given,) m. a Mr. Maxon of Lima Centre, Wis. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

324. ii. Lewis Child, second child and second son of John 
Child and Betsey Harris, b. Sept. 23, 1824, in Saratoga Co., N.Y. 
m. 1st about 1857, Rhoda Frazer; rn. 2d, Sophronia Conrad. 
Resided in Morristown, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. Commenced 
life as a merchant. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

330. i. Henry John Child, b in Rock Co., Wis., 1858. 

331. ii. Allen Child, b. in Rock Co., Wis., 1860. 

332. iii. Adam Child, b. in Rock Co., Wis., 1867, d. young. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

141. v. Betsey Child, fifth child and second dau. of Mark 
Anthony and Hannah Benedict Child, b. in Milton, N. Y., Sept. 
15, 1802, m. 1823, Wm. Harris of Saratoga Co., N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

333. i. Benjamin Franklin Harrls, b. April 6, 1824, m. Polly Jewett. 

334. ii. Hannah Polina Harris, b. July 9. 1827, m. Jonathan Mills. 

335. iii. John Rensselaer Harris, b. Dec. 18, 1834. 

336. iv. Pamelia Harris, b. April 19, 1836. 

337. v. Mark Harris, b. Oct. 16, 1842. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

333. i. Benjamin Franklin Harris, eldest child of Betsey 
Child and William Harris, b. April 6, 1824, m. Polly Jewett 
about 1848. She was b. Dec. 9, 1828. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

338. i. Lyman Wooster Harris, b. Nov. 3, 1849, d. Dec. 31, 1863. 

339. ii. Wm. Henry Harris, b. Oct, 19, 1851, d. Dec. 26, 1852. 

340. iii. Alice Harris, b. Nov. 15, 1853. 

341. iv. Frederick Harris, b. Oct. 19, 1854. 

342. v. Alfred Harris, b. July 4, 1855. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 109 

[Eighth Generation] 

334. ii. Hannah Polina Harris, eldest daughter and 
second child of Betsey Child and Win. Harris, b. July 9, 1827, 
in. about 1^5-i, Jonathan Mills, who was b. 181t>. in Saratoga 
Co., N. Y., now of Austin, Moore Co., Wis. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

343. i. Albert Mills, b. 1855. 

3-14. ii Emma Mills, b. June 25, 185T, d. young. 

345. iii. Byron Barnard Mills, b. Nov. 18, 1859. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

142. vi. Paulina Child, sixth child of Mark Anthony and 
Hannah Benedict Child, b. Nov. 8, 1803, m. Walter Hewitt, 
of Stillwater, Saratoga Co., N. Y. 

Mr. H. went early to Detroit, Mich., with his family, and 
finally to Ypsilanti, where he has resided for many years. He 
has been engaged in mercantile business, prosperous and suc- 
cessful. His children were born in Detroit 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

346. i. Edmund Hewitt, b. in Detroit, Mich., Nov. 14, 1829, m. Lucy 
Post. 

347. ii. Mart Hewitt, b. in Detroit, Mich., 1831, m. Wm. Cheever. 

348. iii. Louis Hewitt, b. in Detroit, Mich., July 23, 1834. 

349. iv. Charles Hewitt, b. in Detroit, Mich., Oct. 3, 1836. 

350. v. Walter Hewitt, b. in Detroit, Mich., Sept. 28, 1839, m. Carrie 
Cook. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

346. i. Edmund Hewitt, eldest son of Paulina Child and 
Walter Hewitt, b. Nov. 14, 1829, m. Lucy Post of Ypsilanti, 
Mich. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children; 

351. i. Lucy Hewitt, d. at birth. 

352. ii. Arthur Child Hewitt, d. young. 

353. iii. Mary Hewitt. 

354. iv. Helen Hewitt. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

347. ii. Mary Hewitt, dau. and second child of Paulina Child 
and Walter Hewitt, b. 1831, m. Wm. E. Cheever, son of Eev. 
Mr. Cheever. He was b. 1835. Mr. Cheever resides in Ypsi- 
lanti, does business in Detroit. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

355. i. Walter Hewitt Cheever, b. Feb. 27, 1859. 

356. ii. Fanny Cheever, b. July 9, 1862. 



110 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBUEY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

350. v. Walter Hewitt, son of Paulina Child and Walter 
Hewitt, b. Sept. 28, 1839, m. Carrie Cook. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

357. i. Walter Hewitt, b. May 18, 1868. 

358. ii. Florence Paulina Hewitt, h. 1870. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

143. vii. Pamelia Child, seventh child of Mark Anthony 
and Hannah Benedict Child, b. Aug. 28, 1604, m. March 9, 
1830, Lyman Wooster of Morristown, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. 
Eemoved to North Hammond, N. Y. 

Mr. Wooster d. Feb. 22, 1849. His sons continued in North 
Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., managing the estate till 
1855, when most of the family removed to Eock county, Wis- 
consin. Now reside at Fort Atkinson, Jefferson county, Wis. 

Mr. Wooster is a descendant of an honorable family of early 
emigrants from Worcestershire, England, who settled in Wor- 
cester, Mass. The name was originally Worcester. Gradu- 
ally, from an easier pronunciation, it was shortened to Wooster. 
It was a family some branches of which flourished in the Eev- 
olution. An early member was a General in the army, and fell 
in battle, in honor of whom government has appropriated 
$25,000 for a monument. On the mother's side the family 
alliance is with the Barber family of Ehode Island, and of 
French descent. This alliance connects with the Grould family, 
from which has descended the great railway king, Jay Gould. 
Among the descendants of these early English emigrants, we 
find many active and enterprising citizens of the present as 
well as past generations. 

Charles Abram Wooster of Hammond, St. Lawrence county, 
N. Y., is a worthy scion of this stock. His father, Abram 
Wooster, was a native of Oneida county, N. Y, born in 1800. 
While yet a boy, he went from his father's home to North 
Hammond, N. Y., then a wilderness, and commenced business 
for himself. His outfit consisted of a rifle (of which he was 
very proud as "a dead shot"), an axe, an extra shirt, and five 
or six dollars of money. He engaged in the business of lum- 
bering, taking his lumber and timber in rafts to Quebec, Can- 
ada. From this business and successful farming operations he 
has become quite wealthy, and is enjoying a happy old age 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. Ill 

(now 80), hale and hearty, in the town of Hammond. His rifle 

is still his pet, and his boast is that he can yet bring clown a 
deer at forty rods. He had a brother, David Wooster, who was 
popularly known for thirty years as a hotel keeper in Oneida 
county, N. Y. 

Charles Abram Wooster, from whom we obtain this account 
of the Wooster family, is a son of Abram and Phebe Wooster, 
a prominent citizen of Hammond, a man of much general intel- 
ligence, of large enterprise, connected with railways, banking, 
&c, in St. Lawrence county. He married Ellen A. Savage of 
Hammond, and has the following children: 

1. Charles Chandler Wooster, b. Sept. 17, 1867, d. 1874. 

2. Lena Laola Wooster, b. May 6, 1873. 
3 Eva Loella Wooster, b. May 7. 1876. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

359. i. Lydia Elizabeth Wooster, b. Jan. 27. 1831, d. Aug. 21, 1848. 

360. ii. Lyman Augustu& Wooster, b. Feb. 10, 1833, m. Henrietta Foltz. 

361. iii. Wm. Harris Wooster, b. Jan. 22.1835. Mr. Wooster enlisted in 
the Union Army on the breaking out of the late rebellion, where by expos- 
ure he was prostrated and sent home, and died on the 3rd of March, 18'i2, at 
Quindaro, Kansas. Was a farmer. 

362. iv. George Washington Wooster, b. April 10, 1837, m. Annie M. 
Cornell. 

363. v. Hannah Maria Wooster, b. Sept. 3, 1839, in. Chas. Edward 
Green. 

364. vi. Sarah Amelia Wooster, b. Dec. 14, 1843, m. James M. Coakley, 
M.D. 

365. vii. John Child Wooster, b. Feb. 3, 1846, d. May 2, 1847, in Ham- 
mond, N. Y. 

366. viii. Lyman Child Wooster, b. Aug. 1, 1849. Resides with his mother 
at Whitewater, Wis. 

[Eighth General ion.] 

360. ii. Lyman Augustus Wooster, eldest son and second 
child of Pamelia Child and Lyman Wooster, b. Feb. 10, 1833, 
m. Henrietta Foltz, d. Dec. 27, 1878, at Fort Atkinson, Wis. 
Carpenter. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

367. i. Mary Wooster, b. March 7, 1868, in Lima, Rock county, Wis. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

362. iv. George Washington' Wooster, son of Pamelia 
Child, and Lyman Wooster, m. Annie M. Cromwell, Nov. 1860 
| Ninth Generation] Children: 

368. i. Myrtle Wooster, b. Nov. 5, 1862. 

369. ii. George Henry Wooster, b. Dee. 18, 1864. 



112 BENJAMIN CHILD, OF ROXBUEY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

363. v. Hannah Maria Wooster, fifth child, and second 
dau. of Pamelia Child, and Lyman Wooster, b. Sept. 3, 1839. m. 
Sept, 25, 1858, Charles E. Green. Reside in Whitewater, Wis. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

370. i. Nellie Amelia Green, b. Dec. 18, 1869. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

366. viii. Lyman Child Wooster, eighth child of Pamelia 
Child and Lyman Wooster, b. Aug. 1, 1819. m. Aug. 6, 1877, 
Ellen Ada Basset, of Whitewater, Wis. Is a teacher in the State 
Normal School, in Whitewater, Wis. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child : 

371. i. Charles Bassett Wooster, b. in Whitewater, June 26, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

144. viii. Rensselaer Child, eighth child of Mark Anthony 
and Hannah Benedict Child, b. Oct. 16, 1809, m. Sept. 1, 1831. 
Charlotte Burnham, of Morristown, St. Lawrence county. N. Y. 
She was b. in the Province of Upper Canada, April 14, 1812, d. 
Feb. 11, 1875. Mr. C. d. in Whitewater, Wis., April 1, 1874. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

372. i. Olive Burnham Child, b. in Morristown, St. Lawrence county, 
N. Y., June 2, 1832, m. Oct. 28, 1854, Joseph Green. 

373. ii. Nancy Child, b. in Morristown, N. Y., June 9, 1835, d. Nov. 8, 
1843. 

374. iii. Elijah Child, b. in Morristown, N. Y., Nov. 13, 1838, d, April 
11, 1842. 

375. iv. James Child, b. in Morristown, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1841, d. Oct. 1, 
1848. 

376. v. Mary Fern Child, b. in Hebron, Wis., Dec. 10, 1845, d. April 
15, 1860. 

377. vi. John J. Child, b. in Lima, Wis., Dec. 3, 1847, d. April 15, 1863. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

372. i. Olive Burnham Child, eldest child of Rensselaer 
and Charlotte Burnham Child, b. Jan. 2, 1832, m. Oct. 28, 1854, 
Joseph Green, of Lima, Wis. Mr. Green is a dentist. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

378. i. Ella Green, b in Palmyra, Wis., Dec. 12, 1856, d. in Lakeland, 
Minn , June 20, 1858. 

379. ii. Oscar Green, b. in Hudson, St. Croix county, Wis., June 3, 1859. 
Is a member of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point. 

380. iii. Mary C. Green, b. in Whitewater, Walworth county, Wis., July 
2, 1867. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 113 

[Seventh Generation.] 

145. ix. Hannah Child, ninth child and fifth dau. of Mark 
Anthony and Hannah Benedict Child, b. in Milton, Saratoga 
county, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1810, m. 1834, Amos H. Burnham, who 
was b. Jan. 22, 1811. Soon after marriage they removed from 
Saratoga county, N. Y., to Hebron, Jefferson county, Wis. Mrs. 
Burnham died Feb. 25, 1861, leaving six children. 
J Eighth Generation.] Children: 

381. i. James M. Boenham, 1>. in Hebron, Wis., June 9, 1836, m. Aug. 13, 
1865, Eveline Abbey. 

382. li. George C. Burnham, b. in Hebron, Wis., June 10, 1839, in. April 
17, 1867, Charlotte Stagg. 

383. iii. Charles Burnham. b. in Hebron, Wis., March 26, 1841, m Jan. 
1. 1868, Almira Torrey. 

384. iv. Charlotte I. Burnham, b. in Hebron, Wis., May 9, 1843. 

385. v. Rensselaer Burnham, b. in Hebron. Wis , May 12, 1845. in. 
May 22, 1870, Mary Garloek. Was in the Union Army for the suppression 
of the Rebellion, in the 33d Vol. Infantry of Wisconsin. Was in many bat- 
tles and skirmishes — at Holly Springs, Vicksburg, Red River, Nashville and 
Mobile, besides many smaller engagements. In all these battles, he never 
received a wound. He served under Gen'ls Grant, A. J. Smith and Thomas, 
No children given of this marriage. 

386. vi. Olive T. Burnham, b. in Hebron, Wis., Aug. 8, 1851. 

[Eighth Generation] 

381. i. James N. Burnham, eldest son of Hannah Child and 
Amos H. Burnham, b. June, 1836, in Hebron, Wis., m. Aug. 
13, 1865, Eveline Abbey. 

Mr. Burnham served in the Union Army through the entire 
war of the Rebellion. He was captured by the rebel forces and 
imprisoned for nine months in a prison, where the suffering 
and barbarity were almost equal to those endured bv our men 
in Andersonville prison. Mr. Burnham was in the 13th Wis. 
Vol. Infantry. He served under Gen'ls Grant, Rosecrans and 
Sherman, and was in the battle at Athens, Ala., and in the fio-ht 
at Donaldsonville, and Lookout Mountain. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

387. i. Hannah D. Burnham, b. Aug. 2, 1867. 

388. ii. Frank D. Burnham, b. Nov., 1869. 

389. iii. Maud M. Burnham, b. Sept. 14, 1871. 

390. iv. Annie E. Burnhan, b. Aug. 15, 1875. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

382. ii. George Burnham, second child of Hannah Child 
and Amos H. Burnham, b. June 10, 1839, m. April IT, 1867, 
Charlotte Stagg. 



114 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

391. i. Flora M. Burnham, b. Aug. 27, 1868. 

392. ii. Olive E. Burnham, b. Dec. 12, 1869. 

393. iii Fred B. Burnham, b. April 18, 1872. 

394. iv. Charlie J. Burnham, b. April 27, 1874. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

383. iii. Charles Burnham, third child of Hannah Child 
and Amos H. Burnham, b. in Hebron, Wis., March 26, 1841,. 
m. Jan. 1, 1868, Almira Torrev. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

395. i. Albert E. Burnham, b. Oct. 15, 1868. 

396. ii. Amos H. Burnhan, b. July 14, 1870. 

397. iii. Emma E. Burnham, b. Sept. 10, 1872. 

398. iv. Alice M. Burnham, b. May 1, 1875. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

386. vi. Olive T. Burnham, sixth child of Hannah Child 
and Amos H. Burnham, b. Aug. 8, 1851, m. Nov. 13, 1872 r 
Will. Marshall. 
[Ninth Generation ] Children: 

399. i. Will Otis Marshall, b. Sept. 3, 1775. 
400 ii. Curtis W. Marshall, b. May 27, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

146. x. Emeline Child, tenth child of Mark Anthony and 
Hannah Benedict Child, b. Jan. 19, 1815, m. 1st, Alanson Barber, 
m. 2nd, Amos H. Burnham, the former husband of her sister 
Hannah. All her children were by her first marriage. Mr. 
Burnham died May 10, 1878, leaving his family in good circum- 
stances. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children of Mrs. Emeline Barber, now Mrs. Burnham. 

401. i. Polly Barber, b. March 4, 1835, d. Sept. 4, 1835. 

402. ii. Benjamin Franklin Barber, b. July 31, 1837. Was in the 
Union Army for suppressing the Rebellion, in 1861, died early in the war 

403. iii. Marian E. Barber, b. Jan. 12, 1839, m. Nov. 15, 1857, John 
Hillsmade. 

404. iv. Myron Child Barber, b. Nov. 9, 1840. 

405. v. Warren Gould Barber, b. Dec. 12, 1842. He enlisted in the 
Union Army at the commencement of the Rebellion, but through exposure 
and sickness lost his sight, and returned home and died in 1863. 

406. vi. John Child Barber, b. Dec. 12, 1844, m. May 4, 1868, Mary 
Frances Craig He is by occupation a master car builder, now of Missouri, 
Kansas and Texas Railway. 

407. vii Lyman Wooster Barber, b. April 7, 1845. 

408. viii. Joseph Lawrence Barber, b. Jan. 2, 1847. 

409. ix. Ann Elizabeth Barber, b. Jan. 12, 1852. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 115 

[Eighth Generation.] 

403. iii. Marian E. Barber, third child of Emeline Child 
and Alanson Barber, b. Jan. 12, 1849, in North Hammond, 
N. Y., m. Nov. 15, 1S57, John Hillsmade, of Sedalia, Mo. 

[Ninth Generation ] Children : 

410. i. Nellie Emeline Hillsmade, b. Nov. 4, 1858. 

411. ii. Myron Warren Hillsmade. b. Dec. 17. 18G0. 

412. iii. Jonx Salls Hillsmade, b. Jan. 22, 1862. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

147. xi. Mark Anthony Child, Jr., eleventh child of Mark 
Anthony and Hannah Benedict Child, b. in Milton, Saratoga 
Co., 1ST. Y , Jan. 13, 1817. m. in 1837 Lydia Robinson, of Ver- 
mont, who was b. April 27, 181S ; they reside at Lima Centre, 
Eock Co., Wis. 

Mr. Child is of full stature, of about 190 lbs. weight : has 
been deputy postmaster in Lima Centre for six or seven years 
past, 

[Eighth Generation. J Children: 

413. i. Adaline Demarius Child, b. in Morristown, St. Lawrence Co., 
N. Y.. Nov. 17, 1840, m. Orson Freeman. 

414. ii. Clinton Demarius Child, b. in Morristown, N. Y.,Dec. 29, 1842, 
m. July 1, 1863, Sarah King. 

415. iii. Martha Jane Child, b. in Morristown, N. Y., Aug. 28. 1844, 
m. Dec. 21, 1865. William Freeman. 

416. iv. John Rensselaer Child, b. in Morristown, N. Y., Jan. 14, 1848, 
d. Aug. 19, 1852. 

417. v. Mark Alonzo Child, b. Oct. 5, 1849, in. Dec. 22, 1877, Mary Mc- 
Coneghy. 

418. vi. George Washington Child, b. Sep. 28, 1852. in Lima Centre, 
Wis. 

419. vii. Louisa Amelia Child, b. Sep. 29, 1854, in Lima Centre. 

420. viii. Vesta A. Child, b. Aug. 11, 1S56, in Lima Centre. 

421. ix. Charles Herbert Child, b. Dec. 12, 1858, in Lima Centre. 

422. x. Freddie Boardman Child, b. April 13, 1864, in Lima Centre. 

[Eighth Generation. ]- 

414. ii. Clinton Demarius Child, second child of Mark 
Anthony, Jr., and Lydia Bobinson Child, b. in Morristown, 
K Y., Dec. 29, 1842," m. July 18, 1864, Sarah King, who was 
b. in Plymouth, Vt., Jan. 5, 1845. 

Mr. Child served two years in the ITnion Army in the war 
of the Rebellion. He is in the mercantile business, and is 
j i< >stmaster at Lima Centre, Wis. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

423. i. Alabel Child, b. in Plymouth, Vt., April 17, 1865. 



116 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

415. iii. Martha Jane Child, third child of Mark Anthony, 
Jr., and Lydia Robinson Child, b. in Morristown, N". Y, Aug. 
28, 1844, m. Dec. 21, 1865, William Freeman. 

Mr. Freeman served in the Union Army in the war of the 
Rebellion. He is a blacksmith. 
[Ninth Generation] Children: 

4234 i. Orion Eugene Freeman, b. May 10. 1867. 

424. ii. Medora Etta Freeman, b. May 9, 1871. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

148. xii. Polly B. Child, twelfth child (and first by Sub- 
mit Peacock) of Mark Anthony and Submit Peacock Child, b. 
in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., Nov, 9, 1820, m May 10, 
1838, Charles Porter Bennett, who was born in the village of 
Mickleton, Gloucestershire, England, July 8, 1812. Reside in 

Ypsilanti, Mich. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

425. i. Mark Bennett, b. in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw Co., Mich., May 19, 
1841, d. Aug. 12, 1841. 

426. ii. Charles Bennett, b in Ypsilanti. Mich., April 10, 1843, d. Oct. 
3, 1845. 

427. iii. Hannah Frances Bennett, b. in. Ypsilanti, Mich., April 26, 
1846, m. March 11. 1867, John Atkin. Jr. 

428. iv. Mary Porter Bennett, b. in Ypsilanti, Mich, Ang. 5, 1848, m. 
Charles M. Phillips. 

429. v. Walter Bennett, b. in Ypsilanti, Mich., May 29, 1852, d. March 
16, 1855. 

430. vi. Charles Walter Bennett, b. in Ypsilanti, Mich., Feb. 16, 
1858. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

427, iii. Hannah Frances Bennett, dau. of Polly B. 
Child and Charles Porter Bennett, b. in Ypsilanti, Mich , 
April 26, 1846, m. March 11, 1867, John Atkins, Jr., in the 
town of Milford, Oakland Co., Mich. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

431. i. Mary Bennett Atkins, b. in Milford, Oakland Co., Mich., Sept. 
5, 1868. 

432. ii. Charles Bennett Atkins, b. in Milford, Mich., May 22, 1871. 

433. iii. Alice Polly Atkins, b. in Milford, Mich., April 6, 1874. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

428. iv. Mary P. Bennett, dau. of Polly B. Child and 
Charles Porter Bennett, b. in Ypsilanti, Mich , Aug. 5, 1848, 

I 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 1 1 7 

m. June 6,1876, Charles M. Phillips, of Milford, Oakland Co., 



[Ninth Generation. J Child: 

434. i Fanny Eliza Phillips, b. in Mason, Ingham Co., Mich., Oct. 21, 
L877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

151. xv. Henrietta Child, dau. of Mark Anthony and 
Submit Peacock Child, m. Edmund Robinson. Mrs. Robinson 
d. in Milton, Eock Co., Wis., 1S65. where Mr. R. lived in 1873. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

435. i. Sylvester Robinson. 

436. ii. Dextek Robinson. 

437. iii Edmund Robinson, b. July 27, 1849. 

438. iv. Walter Hewit Robinson, b. 1853. 

439. v. Augusta Robinson, b. 1856. 
410. vi. Willie Robinson, b. 1861. 

441. vii. Hehbert Robinson, b. 1863. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

152. xvi. Charlotte Child, sixteenth child of Mark 
Anthony and fifth by Submit Peacock, b. Nov. 18, 1833, m. 
Nov. 17, 1864, Mr. Riddle. 

[Eighth Generation] Child: 

442. i. (Name not given.) 

[Sixth Generation.] 

46. vi. Dr. Ephraim Child, sixth child of Capt. Increase 
and Olive Pease Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. May 10, 1773, m. 
Mary Woodworth, youngest child of Ephraim and Anna More 
Woodworth of Stillwater. Saratoga Co., N. Y., Jan. 1, 1790. 
She was b. Feb. 2, 1781. and d. July 18, 1843, at Syracuse, N.Y. 
He was a physician, and practiced his profession in Stillwater, 
N. Y% where he d. June 10, 1830. They had ten children. 

Dr. Ephraim Child was a cousin of the celebrated lawyer, 
Ambrose C. Spencer. The mothers of Mr. Spencer and Mrs. 
Child were sisters. Ambrose C. Spencer's first two wives were 
sisters of Governor DeWitt Clinton ; his third wife was a Norton. 

He survived them all. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

443. i. Eliza Ann Bleeker Child, b. in Stillwater, N. Y., May 18, 
1799, m. Sept. 20, 1841, Zalmon Rice, who d. July 6, 1844. No children. 

444. ii. Ephraim Child, b. in Stillwater. April 10, 1801, m. 1st, Jan. 
25, 1825, Elizabeth Curd Redford; m. 2nd, Betsey Jewell ; m. 3rd, Ann Eliza 
Olmstead. 



118 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

445. iii. Okville Whitmore Child, b. in Stillwater, Dec. 29, 1803, m. 
about 1828, Mary G. Eno. 

446. iv. Theresa Pease Child, b. in Stillwater, Jan. 25, 1805, m. about 
1828, Col. John Fitzgerald, deceased. 

447. v. Noadiah Moody Child, b. in Stillwater, Dec. 20, 1806, m. 1st 
October, 1839, Martha Brewer; m. 2nd, Jan. 26, 1865, Sarah Elizabeth 
Dawes. 

448. vi. Henry Davis Child, b. in Stillwater, Dec, 1808, in. Julia Ann 
Perkins. 

449. vii. Henrietta Schuyler Child, b. in Stillwater, Dec. 22, 1810, 
m. Nov. 12, 1834, Luke Alvord. 

450. viii. Mary Ann Holland Child, b. in Stillwater, Oct. 18, 1813, m. 
1844, Jacob A. Staats of Louisville, Ky., d. July 4, 1850. 

451. ix. Kenetta Willard Child, b. in Stillwater, Jan. 19, 1817, m. 
John H. Pope. Lived at the cor. State and Magazine sts., 6th District, New 
Orleans. 

452. x. Caroline Canfield Child, b. in Stillwater, Aug. 13, 1821, m. 
Capt. Charles Barger, July 6. 1848. He d. March 4, 1856. She in. 2nd, 
G. W. Gerrish, now of San Francisco, Cal. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

443. i. Miss Eliza A. B. Child was early betrothed to Mr. 
Cyrenius W. Canfield of Rochester, New York. The acquaint- 
ance was made when Miss Child was a pupil of the Academy, 
and Mr. Canfield a student of Union College, Schenectady, 
N. Y. The engagement was a long one, for both were young, 
and Mr. Canfield had his collegiate course to finish, and his 
professional one to pursue, and then to enter upon its duties 
and emoluments before they could expect their union. But 
each was true, and the golden hopes of success illumined the 
years of waiting. 

Earnest study and courageous toil were opening the doors to 
an honorable and gifted manhood, — fond parents rejoicing in 
fulfilled expectations, — friends prophesying high attainfnents 
and a prominent career, — a bright and loving maiden putting 
on the festive robes ; suddenly the end came ; a few days 
illness, and the life of earth was left for the life of eternity. 
Parents' hopes crushed, friends' bright anticipations over- 
thrown, sable garments exchanged for bridal sheen, the mar- 
riage week became that of entombment. Comforted by the 
ready and full recognition of her lover's talents and acquire- 
ments, made by his friends and legal associates, Miss Child in 
time could smile again. In September, 1841, she became the 
wife of Mr. Zalraon Rice a merchant of Lyons, Wayne Co., 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 119 

New Y<»rk, whom she has survived many years. But the glow- 
ing tints of her morning have not wholly faded from the even- 
in-' of her life, and to meet the chosen one of early days, is 
one of the joys of anticipation crowning the future existence. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

444. ii. Ephraim Child, second child of Dr. Ephraim and 
Mary Woodworth Child, b. April 10. 1801, m. first, Jan. 25, 
1S25. Elizabeth Curd Bedford; m. second to Betsey Jewell; 
m. third to Ann Eliza Olmstead. Resides in Weedsport, N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation] Children: 

453. i. Orville Child, b. in Troy, N.T., Feb. 9, 1827. Resides in Syra- 
cuse 

454. ii. Wallace Child, b. Feb. 22, 1831, d. June 9, 1831. 

455. iii. Martha Renetta Child, b. June, 1832, m. Floyd Johnson. 

456. iv. DeWitt Clinton Child, b. June, 1834, d. Oct. 21, 1844. 

457. v. Eliza Ann Child, b. April 23, 1836, m. Dee. 27, 1853, Samuel 
Everhart. 

458. vi George W. Child, b. Dee. 1, 1839, in Lysander, Oswego Co., 
N. Y., in. April 23, 1865. Mary Cordelia La Fever. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

457. v. Eliza Axx Child, fifth child of Ephraim and Eliz- 
abeth Curd Bedford Child, b. April 23, 1886. m. Dec. 27, 1853, 
Samuel Everhart of Lyons, N. Y.; he was b. Nov. 10, 1829, 
in Newfield. Tompkins Co., N. Y.; removed to Berlin, Mich. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

459. i. Floyd Johnson Everhart, } m T - s ( b. at Xayland, Allegan- 

460. ii. Ephraim Everhart. f "\ Co., Mieh., Apr. 11, 1855. 

461. iii. Carrie Estella Everhart, b. at Berlin, Mich., Nov. 24. 1857. 

462. iv. Geo. Wright Everhart, b. at Berlin, Mich., Oct, 29, 1863. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

458. vi. George W. Child, sixth child of Ephraim and 
Elizabeth Curd Bedford Child, b. Dec. 1, 1839, m. April 23, 
1865, Mary Cordelia La Fever. She was b. August, 1848, at 
Hector, N". Y. Reside at Grand Rapids, Mich. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

463. i. Charles Sanford Child, b. at Muskegon, Mich., Feb. 17, 1867. 

464. ii. Wm. Orville Child, b. Jan. 5, 1869, in Muskegon, Mich. 

[Seventh Generation] 

445. iii. Orville Whitmore Childs, third child and second 
son of Dr. Ephraim and Mary Woodworth Child, b. in Still- 
water, N. Y., Dec. 29, 1803, m. Mary G. Eno. (The date of 



120 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

the marriage or birth of children we have been unable to ascer- 
tain.) 

Orville W. Childs was one of the foremost and ablest practi- 
cal civil engineers in this country. He was early in the employ 
of the State of New York, and our magnificent public works 
attest his genius and his skill. His labors and accomplish- 
ments were not confined to this State alone, but were extended 
to and embraced other gigantic enterprises and works of national 
interest and renown. 

He had charge of a large amount of work, and was engaged 
in the survey and construction of the Champlain canal improve- 
ment, in 1824-5, and the building of the Oswego canal in 1S26-8. 
He made the survey and plans for the improvement and nav- 
igation of the Oneida river in 1829-30, which were adopted, 
and the work was completed in 1850. He was next engaged 
with John B. Jervis in constructing the Chenango canal, in 
1833-6, and in the latter year commenced his labors on the 
Erie canal enlargement, which was divided into three divisions 
he being the chief engineer of the middle division of that work, 
which extended from Syracuse to Eochester. He was occu- 
pied upon this enlargement during most of the many years it 
took to complete that great work ; but not as a division en- 
gineer only, for in 1840 he was appointed chief engineer of the 
New York State works entire, which position he held and 
filled with signal ability and honor for a period of seven years. 

In 1848 he was the Democratic candidate for the office of 
state engineer, then created, but was defeated with the rest of 
the ticket. He was the companion, adviser and trusted friend 
of Governor William C. Bouck, Azariah C. Flagg, Henry Sey- 
mour, Jonas Earll, Jr., Michael Hoffman, Stephen Van Rens- 
selaer and their contemporaries, and shared with John B. Jer- 
vis and William J. McAlpine the celebrity and honors arising 
from the plans upon which the enlarged Erie canal were based. 
Of those eminent engineers who grew up with him or under 
him and reached prominence in their profession are Van R. 
Richmond and Sylvanus H. Sweet, each having filled the office 
of state engineer several different times, and John D. Fay, the 
eminent canal commissioner. 

In 1848-9 he was chief engineer in the survey and construc- 
tion of the N. Y. Central RR. from Syracuse to Rochester (di- 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 121 

rect road). He left this to accept a like position at the instance 
of the American Atlantic and Pacific Ship Canal Co., of which 
Cornelius Vanderbilt and others were at the head, and who 
had a grant from the government of Nicaraugua, Central 
America, to build an inter-oceanic ship canal across that coun- 
try, and in this gigantic enterprise he was occupied in 1850-52. 
His reports, maps, surveys and estimates of this work at- 
tracted universal attention throughout this country and Eu- 
rope, and are regarded as models of thorough, exact and re- 
liable scientific and practical skill. It was and is still held to 
be the most feasible and perfect survey of that route, which 
extended from the harbor of Greytown on the Atlantic, to that 
of Brito on the Pacific. The difficulties which were overcome, 
both of an engineering and plrysical character, to accomplish 
this work, together with the prominence of the enterprise and 
the ability with which it was conducted, established and con- 
firmed his high rank in his profession. He also surveyed the 
route across the country from Lake Nicaraugua to the Pacific, 
of the Accessory Transit Co.'s passenger route, and afterwards 
visited Europe with Commodore Yanderbilt and others in rela- 
tion to raising the necessary capital for constructing this ship 
canal, and was received there with marked attentions and honor. 
The above reports made by him have now become scarce, out 
of print, and are highly valued. 

Subsequently he became chief engineer, and surveyed and 
constructed the Terre Haute and Alton KR in 1855-8; was 
one of a commission of three to report on the practicability of 
putting a tunnel under the Hudson river at Albany, and made 
a survey and important investigation in behalf of the State 
of New York, for the purpose of designating and fixing the 
limits and boundaries of the City and County of New York, 
and to determine the extent of the encroachments thereon, and 
afterwards was engaged in the matter of the harbor defences 
about that city. 

He removed from Syracuse, N. Y., where he had resided for 
the greater part of his life, to Philadelphia, Pa., about 1860, 
where he was engaged as one of the patentees and proprietors 
of the sleeping cars, then newly invented, and in other railroad 
interests. Was president of the Central Transportation Co., 
I 



122 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS 



and the Philadelphia Car Works, and died in that city Sept. 
6, 1870. 

His name was synonymous with integrity, unflagging indus- 
try and high moral and intellectual worth. He was a close, 
hard student, persevering, and of high and exalted ideas as to 
his profession, in which he took great pride, and sought by 
every means in his power to elevate its standard to the highest 
pitch. He had profound contempt for all who were idle, shift- 
less, dishonest or unambitious. He was indefatigable in ac- 
complishing whatever he undertook, and was upright, honest 
and incorruptible, without the shadow of a blemish in his whole 
professional career. The labors of his pen will be found scat- 
tered through the public documents and statute books of this 
State during a period of forty years prior to his death, and he 
contributed much to professional literature. He prepared the 
majority of the canal reports to the Legislature during his time. 
Always careful, considerate and exact to the minutest point, 
these habits of thought and action made him a safe counsellor 
and guide, and his opinion and advice was much sought after. 
In all these qualities he left a noble example in his profession 
as well as out of it. He was of dignified, impressive bearing, 
and unusually fine looking, of full habit and excellent features, 
and left a handsome fortune. His conversation was deeply in- 
teresting, his manner forcible and sincere, and his utterances 
always carried weight. Vigorous, inflexible in his convictions 
and accustomed to push all his undertakings to a successful 
issue, he justly earned the appellation, " an extraordinarv 
man." 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

**** i. Caroline Mary Childs, b. 1833, m. 1st, William T. Shear, 2d, 
John H. Nye, 3d, M. B. Weaver. Mrs. Weaver resides at Waverly, N. Y. 

**** ii. John Hinman Childs, b. 1839, m. Oct, 7, 1863, Frances Amelia 
Burton, dan. of Burr and Laura M. Burton, at Syarcuse, N. Y. She was 
b. at Syracuse, Feb. 8, 1844. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children of John Hinman and Frances Burton Childs : 

**** i. Oryille Burton Childs, b. June 3, 1864, d. July 36, 1865. 

**** ii. Fannie Childs, b. Aug. 19, 1865. 

**** iii. Mary G. Childs, b. Dec. 13, 1866. 

**** iv. John Childs, b. June 19, 1868. 

**** v. Carrie Childs, b. Aug. 26, 1874. 

**** v i. Florence Childs, b. Sept. 6, 1877. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 123 

[Seventh Generation.] 

446. iv. Theresa Pease Child, fourth child and second dau 
of Dr. Ephraim and Mary Wood worth Child, b. in Stillwater, 
Saratoga county, N. Y., Jan. 25, 1805, m. about 1828, Col- 
John Fitzgerald. Col. Fitzgerald died at Phoenix, N. Y., 
where Mrs. F. still resides. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

465. i. Ephraim Fitzgerald, b. in Stillwater. X. Y., Oct. 28, 1830, m. 
Ella Alvord. 

466. ii. Cyrexius Caxfield Fitzgerald, b. in Clifton, Saratoga county, 
N. Y.. March 19, 1832; m. 1st, Maria Gonez, m. 2nd. Mary Porter; m. 3rd, 
Willie M. Graves. 

467. iii. Franklin Alvord Fitzgerald, b. May 2S, 1834. m. 1854, Ada 
H. Leland. 

468. iv. George Fitzgerald, b. 1843, d. at 8 months. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

465. i. Ephraim Fitzgerald, eldest child of Theresa Pease 
Child and Col. John Fitzgerald, b. in Stillwater, N. Y., Oct. 28 
1830, m. Jan. 20, 1854, Ella Alvord. dau. of Thomas Alvord, 
Esq., of Homer, N. Y., at one time Lieut. Gov. of New York. 
Mr. Fitzgerald was a hardware merchant in Phoenix, N. Y. 
[Ninth Genaration.] Child: 

469. i. Elizabeth Fitzgerald, b. Sept. 28, 1860. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

466. ii. Cyrenius Caxfield Fitzgerald, second child of 
Theresa Pease Child and Col. John Fitzgerald, b. in Clifton, 
N. Y., March 19, 1832, m. Dec. 1858, Maria Gonez, of Leon, 
Nicaragua, Central America. She died in Chenondaga, Cen- 
tral America, Nov. 30, 1867. He m. second, Mary Porter, dau. 
of John K. Porter, of Albany, N. Y. She lived but three 
months after marriage. He married third, in 1870, Willie M. 
Graves of New Haven, Ct. They reside at Venezuela, South 
America. Mr. Fitzgerald is a mining engineer, on a salary of 
twenty thousand dollars a year. 

[Ninth Generation] Children: 

470. i. Rixaldo Fitzgerald, b. in Chenandoga, Cent. America, Sept. 14, 
1860. 

471. ii. Geo. Edwix Fitzgerald, b. in Chenandoga, Cent. America, Aug. 
14, 1862. 

472. iii. Theresa Fitzgerald, b. in. Chenandoga, Cent. America, Aug. 
17, 1864. 

473. iv. Doxxie Felipe Fitzgerald, b. in Chenandoga, Cent. America, 
Nov. 29, 1867. 

Three of these children are now in Claverick College, X. Y., and one in 
school at New Orleans, La. 



124 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

467. iii. Franklin Alvord Fitzgerald, third child of 
Theresa Pease Child and Col. John Fitzgerald, b. in Salina, 
Onondaga county, N. Y., May 28, 1834, m. 1854, Ada H. Le. 
land, dau. of Judge Leland of Steuben county, N. Y. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

474. i. L. Amelia Theresa Fitzgerald, b. Sept. 28, 1855, in Oswego 
county, N. Y. 

475. ii. John L. Fitzgerald, b. Sept. 28, 1859. member of Union College, 
and will graduate 1880. 

476. iii. Nellie Fitzgerald, b. in Half Moon, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1861. 

477. iv. Louisa Stillman Fitzgerald, b. in Brunswick, Ga., July 15> 
1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

447. v. Noadiah Moody Childs, fifth child and third son of 
Dr. Ephraim and Mary Wood worth Child, b. in Stillwater, Sar. 
atoga county, K Y., Dec. 6, 1806, m. first Oct. 1839, Martha 
Brewer, dau. of Simeon and Eunice Brewer of Providence, R 
I. She was b. Aug. 23, 1821, and d. at Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 
31, 1S63. His second m. was in Jan. 26, 1865, to Sarah Eliza- 
beth Dawes, dau. of Ebenezer Dawes, Esq. 

During the first half of his life, Mr. N. M. Childs was a civil 
engineer like his brother Orville W., and with him assisted in the 
running and construction of the Oswego canal, in 182S-9, the 
Oneida river improvement in 1829-30, and the Chenango canal 
in 1S35. He was then appointed superintendent of the Oswego 
canal, which office he filled until 1839, and had charge of the ex- 
traordinary repairs and improvements made in this canal during 
that time. He was engaged as an engineer on the Erie canal 
enlargement from Syracuse to Lyons in 1839-40. In 1841, he 
entered into mercantile business, and the manufacture of salt at 
Syracuse, (then Salina) taking up his residence there, and has ever 
since been so engaged to quite a large extent. He was one of the 
commissioners of public schools of Syracuse, and was president 
of the board of education in 1855. He was one of the trustees 
of the Syracuse Salt Company, and was president of that com- 
pany in 1872, and a prominent citizen of Syracuse, where he 
still resides. 

Martha Brewer, the first wife of Noadiah M. Childs, (born 
1821, died 1863) was a woman of remarkable sweetness of char- 
acter, deep piety, and good deeds. She practiced a liberal char- 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 125 

ity, was quiet, unobtrusive, and took a prominent part in church 
matters. She was one of those who first organized Plymouth 
Church at Syracuse, and died in the midst of her useful life, 
deeply bereaved by all who knew her. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

478. i. Elizabeth Bell Childs, b. in Syracuse. X. Y., Oct. 29, 1840, m. 
Feb. 9, 1869, Theodore L. Scott. 

479. ii. Daniel Brewer Guilds, 1). in Syracuse, May 5, 1843, in. Dec. 
24, 1867. Mary F. Powers Vanderworker, of Waterford, N. Y. 

480. iii. William Augustus Childs, b. in Syracuse, March 9, 1846. 

481. iv. Franklin Earl Childs, b. in Syracuse, Oct. 16, 1848. 

482. v. Anna Louisa Child, b. in Syracuse, Sept. 3, 1855, in. June, 1877, 
Henry D. Dillaye, Esq., attorney at law, of the firm of Yaun, McClennan & 
Dillaye; reside in Syracuse, N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

478. i. Elizabeth Bell Childs, eldest child of Noadiah 
and Martha Brewer Childs, b. in Syracuse, N.Y., Oct. 29, 184:0, 
m. Feb. 9, 1869, Theodore L. Scott, Esq., cashier of the Na- 
tional Albany Exchange Bank, at Albany, 1ST. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

483. i. Martha Bell Scott, b. in Syracuse, X. Y., Nov. 29, 1876. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

479. ii. Daniel Brewer Childs, second child and eldest 
son of Noadiah Moody and Martha Brewer Childs, b. in Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., May 5, 1843, m. Dec. 24, 1867, Mary F. Powers 
Yanderwerker, dau. of Robert and Margaret Yanderwerker of 
Waterford, N. Y. 

Mr. Childs* graduated at Yale College, in 1868, and at the 
Albany Law School, in 1864. He entered the law office of 
Sedgwick, Andrews & Kenned}', at Syracuse, N. Y., and re- 
moved to the City of New York, January 1st, 1866, where he 
entered into partnership with the Hon. Amos Gr. Hull, and 
practiced law under the name of Hull & Childs for four years. 
His health becoming impaired, he suspended practice for a 
year, when he resumed under his own name, in 1871. In 1874 
he formed a partnership with Hon. Herbert G. Hull, subse- 

* We are indebted to the kindness of Daniel B. Child, Esq., of New York 
City (195 Broadway), for brief notices of some of the members of his branch 
of the family. In connection therewith, he remarks: "I will add that my 
uncle, Orville \Y., and my father were the first to add the final "s" to our 
name, in our line, a thing I regret." 



126 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

quently Assistant IT. S. District Attorney, under the name of 
Childs & Hull, which firm still continues, having its office in 
the Western Union Building, 195 Broadway, N. Y., he resid- 
ing at Englewood, New Jersey. The firm has been engaged 
in many important and prominent suits in that city, and does 
a large civil business. 

He was a director in the Manhattan Quotation Telegraph 
Co., in 1874 and 1875, and was one of the original projectors 
of the Law Telegraph Co., in 1874, by which lawyers and their 
clients, and merchants generally, were put into telegraphic com- 
munication with each other, the courts and public buildings in 
New York and Brooklyn, and in which telephones are now used, 
and he has been from its organization a director, and the vice 
president of that company. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

480. iii. William Augustus Childs, third child and sec- 
ond son of Noadiah Moody and Martha Brewer Childs, b. at 
Syracuse, N. Y., March 9, 1816, m. Dec. 5, 1878, Julia Maria 
Selleck, dan. of James W. and Elizabeth Selleck of Englewood, 
N. Y. She was b. at Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 25, 1850. 

Mr. Childs studied at the University of Michigan, at Ann 
Arbor, and removed from Syracuse to the City of New York, 
early in 1866. He entered the wholesale woolen house of Hull, 
Holmes & Ingersoll, in Walker street, and after remaining there 
a few years, he went into the employ of the Standard Life In- 
surance Co.,. of which he was made assistant secretary. In 
1871 he received the appointment of superintendent of agen- 
cies of the Manhattan Life Insurance Co., and in 1874, became 
interested with his brother Daniel, in projecting the Law Tele- 
graph Co., heretofore described, and devoted his entire time and 
energies to building it up to its present successful condition. 
From its organization he has been a director, its treasurer and 
manager. 

The office of the Company is at 140 Fulton street, N. Y., 
and he resides at Englewood, N. J. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

**** i. Arthur Childs, b. at Englewood, N. Y., Sept. 15, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

481. iv. Franklin Earl Childs, fourth child and third son 
of Noadiah Moody and Martha Brewer Childs, b. in Syracuse, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 127 

N. Y., Oct. 16, 184:8, m. Nov. 20, 1878, Mary Irene Sabin, 
dan. of John and Cora Irene Scranton Sabin, b. Jan. 8, 1853. 
She is the granddaughter of Edwin Scranton, Esq., who was 
editor of the first newspaper published in Rochester, N. Y. Mr. 
Childs graduated at Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., class of 
'59. Residence Bay City, Mich. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 
**** i. Emalita Phillips Childs, b. in Bay City, Mich., Oct, 21, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

448. vi. Henry Davis Child, sixth child of Dr. Ephraim 
and Mary Woodworth Child, b. Nov. 16, 1808, in Stillwater, 
N. Y., m. Aug. 1832, Julia Ann Perkins. She d. in Wilming- 
ton, Will Co., 111. July 17, 1878. He was a farmer, and died 
in W. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

484. i Celia Ann Child, b. Nov. 24, 1834, m. 1st, Z. F. Hanford, m. 
2nd. A. Wilkins. 

485. ii. Helen Child, b. May 20, 1841, in. R. D. Loudon, farmer. 
48G. iii. Frank Child, (adopted.) 

[Eighth Generation.] 

484. i. Celia Ann Child, first child of Henry Davis and 
Julia Ann Perkins Child, b. Nov. 24, 1834, m. first, Nov. 24 
1S52, Zalmon R Hanford, at Wilmington, 111., m. second April 
11, 1872, Abraham Wilkins, of Wilmington, 111. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

487. i. Harriet Hanford, b. at Rockville, Kankee Co., 111., Oct. 21, 1853, 

488. ii. Abbie J. Hanford, b. at Manteno, Kankee Co., Oct. 7, 1863. 

[Ninth Generation ] 

487. i. Harriet Hanford, first child of Celia Ann Child 
and Zalmon F. Hanford, m. Sep. 3, 1872, at Chicago, 111., Eugene 
Sue Kimball. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

489. i. Mark Reese Kimball, b. at Chicago, 111., July 15, 1873. 

490. ii. Harriet Sue Kimball, b. at Chicago, 111., Dec. 7, 1874. 

491 iii. Helen Elizabeth Kimball, b. at Chicago, 111., Sep. 19, 1876. 
492. iv. Eugene Sue Kimball, b. at Chicago, 111., March 19, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

4S5. ii. Helen Child, second child of Henry Davis and 
Julia Ann Perkins Child, b. May 20, 1841, m. at Wilmington, 
111., March 13, 1862, Rodney D.~Loudon. 



128 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBUKY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

493. i. Mary Loudon, b. at Wilmington, 111., April 13, 1863, d May 9, 
1864. 

494. ii. Fred Loddon, b. at Wilmington, 111., Jan. 27, 1866. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

449. vii. Henrietta Schuyler Child, seventh child of 
Dr. Ephraim and Mary Woodworth Child, b. at Stillwater, 
Saratoga Co., K Y., Oct. 22, 1810, m. at Syracuse, N. Y., Nov. 
12, 1834, Luke Alvord, eldest son of Dioclesian Alvord. He 
is an architect, and resides at Vallejo, Cal. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

495. i. Cass L. Alvord, b. at Syracuse, N. Y., Sep. 13, 1836, m. Martha 
Taylor. 

496. ii. Helen Burnett Alvord, b. at Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 30, 1845. 
m. at Vallejo, Cal., July 9, 1867, William H. Tripp. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

495. i. Cass L. Alvord, son of Henrietta S. Child and Luke 
Alvord, b. Sept. 13, 1836, m. Martha Taylor, neice of Gen. 
Zachary Taylor. Mr. Alvord is a civil engineer, and resides at 
Springfield, 111. (1879.) 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

497. i. Luke Edward Alvord, b. March 22, 1867, at Springfield, 111. 

498. ii. Horace Alvord, b. April 3, 1869, at Springfield, 111. 

499. iii. Mary Alvord, b. May 4, 1873, at Springfield, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

496. ii. Helen Burnett Alvord, dau. of Henrietta S. 
Child and Luke Alvord, b. at Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 20, 1815, 
m. Wm. II. Tripp of Vallejo, Cal, July 9, 1867. Mr. Tripp is 
professor of Penmanship, and resides with his family at Val- 
lejo, Cal. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

500. i. Spencer L. Tripp, b. at Vallejo, California. July 25, 1870. 

501. ii. Don Everett Tripp, b. at Vallejo, California, June 2, 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

450. viii. Mary Ann Holland Child, dau. of Dr. Ephraim 
and Mary Woodworth Child, b. Oct. 16, 1818, at Stillwater, 
N. Y., m. Feb., 3831, Samuel McCleary, superintendent of 
public works. Mr. McCleary was b. May 13, 1809, at Water- 
vliet, Albany county, N. Y. They had one child who died in 
infancy. Mrs. McCleary m. 1844, Jacob Staats. She was a 
successful teacher of French, possessed excellent musical ability, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 129 

and was the organist of the church. Religious in sentiment, 
she cordially gave her aid as an instructor in the Sabbath school. 
She was a member of an order termed the "Federal Arch." Her 
death was sudden, from an attack of the cholera, and occurred 
upon a steamer on which she had taken passage at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, for Galena, 111. All care and attention were rendered by 
the captain of the steamer, in her illness, and death ; he caused 
her to be honorably buried with the service of the Episcopal 
church at Leavenworth, Ind. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

452. x. Caroline Canfield Child, dau. of Dr. Ephraim 
and Maty Woodworth Child, b. Aug. 13, 1821, m. July 6, 1848, 
Capt. Charles Barger, at Galena, 111. Capt. Barger died at New 
Orleans, at the residence of his cousin, Dr. Jones, Feb. 22, 1857. 
A Galena paper gives the following: "Capt. Chas. Barger has 
been for many years past, extensively known as one of the best 
and most accomplished steamboat captains on the Mississippi 
river, both on the upper and lower trade, and by his gentle- 
manly deportment, by his decision of character, by his upright 
and honorable action and bearing on all occasions, he won 
universal confidence and esteem. His sickness was long and 
painful, terminating in consumption. He died in the full as- 
surance of Christian faith, leaving a devoted wife and friends 
everywhere to mourn his loss. The funeral of Capt. Barger 
was attended by many of our citizens at the Episcopal church. 
He was buried with the honors of Odd Fellowship." Mrs. Car- 
oline C. Barger was again married some years afterwards, May 
16, 1868, at the residence of her sister, Mrs. John H. Pope, in 
New Orleans, to G. M. Gerrish, Professor of Metallurgy, of San 
Francisco, Cal. His native place is Portland, Maine. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

47. vii. Olive Child, seventh child of Capt, Increase and 
Olive Pease Child, b. in "Oblong," town of Armenia, Dutchess 
Co., N. Y., March 11, 1775, m. 1798, Alfred Bosworth, of 
English ancestory, his earliest ancestor in this country came 
sometime after the year 1630, and settled in or near Bristol, 
R. I. Alfred Bosworth was b. in Bristol, Pt. L, Feb. 26, 1773, 
and removed to Saratoga Co., N. Y., about 1797. He died 
July 11, 1861, at Dundee, 111. They had six children. She 
died Aug. 20, 1847. 



130 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

502. i. Mary Church Bosworth, b. in Milton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
Oct, 17, 1799, m. Sep. 13, 1818, Harry Weed. 

503. ii. Benjamin F. Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, N. Y., Oct, 7, 1801, 
m. 1st, Alraira Smith, m. 2nd, Elizabeth Nixon. 

504. iii. Oliver C. Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
Dec. 30, 1803. 

505. iv. Lucinda S. Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, N. Y., March 29, 1806, 
m. Alfred Edwards. 

50G. v. Abigail M. Bosworth, m. Benjamin Simonds; have no children. 

507. vi. Increase Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
April 2, 1812. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

502. i. Mary Church Bosworth, eldest child of Olive 
Child and Alfred Bosworth, b. in Milton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
Oct 13, 1799, m. Sep. 13, 1818, Harry Weed. She d. Sep. 19, 
1846. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

508. i. Alfred Bosworth Weed, b. Dec. 9, 1820, in. May 2, 1841, Betsey- 
Rice. 

509. ii. Mary Ann Weed, b. Nov. 6, 1822, m. Samuel J. Smith, Oct. 17, 
1843. 

510. iii. Oscar Fitzallan Weed, b. Nov. 26, 1824, m. Jan. 16, 1845, 
Laura Conger. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

508. i. Alfred Bosworth Weed, eldest child of Mary 
Church Bosworth and Harry Weed, b. Dec. 9, 1820, m. May 
2, 1841, Betsey Eice. He d. Feb. 25, 1850. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

511. i. George Cromwell Weed, b. Feb. 5, 1842, m. Jan. 7, 1866, Ellen 
White. 

512. ii. Helen M. Weed, b. June 25, 1844, m. Feb. 22, 1860, Francis 
Rafferty. 

513. iii. Charles S. Weed, b. Nov. 5, 1846, m. Dec. 23, 1875, Ada Ross- 
man. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

511. i. George Cromwell Weed, eldest child of Alfred 

Bosworth and Betsey Rice Weed, b. Feb. 5, 1842, m. Jan. 7, 

1866, Ellen White. 
[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

514. i. Minnie H. Weed, b. Oct 9, 1869. 

515. ii. Etta M. Weed, b. May 1, 1871. 

516. iii. Nora Weed, b. April 30, 1874. 

517. iv. Edith Weed, b. Oct. 28, 1776. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 131 

[Ninth Generation.] 

512. ii. Helen M. Weed, second child of Alfred Bosworth 

and Betsey Biee Weed, b. June 25, 1844, m. Feb. 22, 1860, 

Francis Rafferty. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children: 

518. i. Albourne Eleanor Rafferty, 1). July 23, 1801. 

519. ii. Bstella Rafferty, b. April '32, 1863. 

520. iii. Frank Raffertt, b, Oct. 23, 1860. 

521. iv. Cora Rafferty, b. June 7, 1870. 

522. v. Thomas Rafferty, b. July 8. 1872. 

523. vi. Nellie Rafferty, b. April 3, 1876. 

524. vii. Marietta Rafferty, b. Aug. 13, 1878. 

[Ninth Generation.] 

513. iii. Charles S. Weed, third son of Alfred B. Weed 
and Betsey Rice Weed, b. Nov. 5, 1846, m. Dec. 23, 1875, 
Ada Rossman. 

[Tenth Generation.] Child: 

525. i. Della Leona Weed, b. Jan. 13, 1877. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

509. ii. Mary Ann Weed, second child of Mary Church 

Boswortli and Harry Weed, b. Nov. 1, 1822, m. Oct. 17, 1843, 

Samuel Smith Mr. Smith died in 1849. She m. 2nd, Nov. 6, 

1858, Henry B. Reeves. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

526. i. Franklin B. Smith, b. Feb. 7, 1846, d. June 6, 1847. 

527. ii. George M. Smith, b Noy. 29, 1847, d. Not. 14, 1848 

[Eighth Generation.] 

510. iii. Oscar F. Weed, third child of Mary Church Bos- 
worth and Harry Weed, b. Nov. 26, 1824, m. Jan.H6, 1845, 
Laura Conger. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

528. i. Alfred Bosworth Weed, b. Aug. 5. 1850. 

529. ii. Frederick C. Weed, b. April 1, 1854, m. Belle Stowe, 1874. 

530. iii. Della M. Weed, b. April 16, 1856, m. Oct. 16, 1873, Edson E. 
Gordon. 

[Tenth Generation.] Children of Delia M. Weed and Edson Gordon: 

531. i. Laura L. Gordon, b. May 9, 1875. 

532. ii. Alfred Weed Gordon, b. Feb. 27, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation] 

503. ii. Benjamin F. Bosworth, second child of Olive 
Child and Alfred Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, N.Y., Oct, 7, 1801, 
m. first to Almira Smith; m. second, Elizabeth Nixon. He died 
Sept. 8, 1843, in McHenry Co., 111. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child, by Almira Smith : 

533. i. Franklin S. Bosworth, b. Dec. 17, 1832, m. Sarah E. Hunt. 



132 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

533. i. Franklin S. Bosworth. eldest and probably only 
child of Benjamin F. Bosworth and Almira Smith, b. Dec. 17, 
1832, m. 1858, Sarah E. Hunt. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

534. i. Edward Increase Bosworth, b. Jan. 10, 1861. 

535. ii. Mary A. Bosworth, b. Sept. 23, 1867. 

536. iii. Frank H. Bosworth, b. Sept. 3, 1870. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

501. iii. Oliver C. Bosworth, third child of Olive Child 
and Alfred Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, N. Y., Dec. 30, 1803, 
m. — ; d. in Nashville, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., July 15, 1835. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

537. i. Franklin H. Bosworth, b. — ; m. Feb. 23, 1851, Mary Wax- 
ham. 

538. ii. William A. Bosworth. 

539. iii. Julia Bosworth, b. Dec. 3, 1834; m. Sept, 23, 1857, A. L. 
Bishop. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

537. i. Franklin H. Bosworth, eldest child of Oliver C. 
Bosworth, b. — ; m. Feb. 23, 1851, Mary Waxham. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

540. i. Frederick A. BoswoRTn. b. May 15, 1857. 

541. ii. Alfred B. Bosworth, b. June 17, 1859. 

542. iii. Olive C. Bosworth, b. Mar. 23, 1868. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

539. iii. Julia Bosworth, third child of Oliver O. Bosworth 

and , b. Dec. 3, 1834, m. Sept. 23, 1857, A. L. Bishop. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

543. i. Mary Bishop, b. July 16, 1868. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

505. iv. Lucinda Bosworth, fourth child of Olive Child 
and Alfred Bosworth, b. in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., 
Mar. -29, 1806, m. July 8, 1829, Alfred Edwards of Greenfield, 
N. Y. Mrs. Edwards d. July 12, 1849. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

544. i. Esther Lucinda Edwards, b. Jan. 17, 1831. 

545. ii. Mary Edwards, b. Aug. 19, 1832. m. April 26, 1852, J. A. Car- 
penter. 

546. iii. George Edwards, b. Mar. 20, 1834. 

547. iv. Henry Edwards, b. July 14, 1835, m. April 17, 1866, Adelaide 

Dunton. 

548. v. Elizabeth B. Edwards, b. March 2, 1838 m. Feb. 23, 1860, J. C. 

Wilder. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 133 

549. vi. Olivia Adelaide Edwards, b. March 2, 1840. 

550. vii. Abbey Annette Edwards, b. May 22, 1845. 

551. viii. Louisa Stillman Edwards, b. Aug. 27, 1846. 

552. ix. Ella Lucinda Edwards, b. June 27, 1849, in. Sept. 20, 1870, E. 
F. Cleveland, M. D. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

545. ii. Mary Edwards, second child of Lucinda Bosworth 
and Alfred Edwards, b. Aug. 19, 1832, m. April 26, 1852 
Julias Angelo Carpenter of Dundee, 111. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

553. i. Ella Carpenter, b. Dec. 27, 1854. 

554. ii. Alice May Carpenter, b. May 17, 1860. 

555. iii Infant son, 1). Dec. 27, 1872. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

547. iv. Henry Edwards, fourth child of Lucinda Bos- 
worth and Alfred Edwards, b. July 14, 1835, m. April 17, 

1866, Adelaide Dunton of Dundee, 111. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

556. i. Alfred Dunton Edwards, b. Feb. 18, 1867. 

557. ii. Florence Edwards, b. June 2, 1869. 

558. iii. May Edwards, b. May 26, 1872. 

559. iv. Lucinda Edwards, b. Feb., 1868. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

548. v. Elizabeth B. Edwards, fifth child of Lucinda and 

Alfred Edwards, b. March 2, 1838, in. Feb. 23, 1860, Jedediah 

Charles Wilder. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

560. i. Charles E. Wilder, b. Jan. 11, 1861. 

561. ii. Ella May Wilder, b. March 21, 1867. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

552. ix. Ella Lucinda Edwards, ninth child of Lucinda 
and Alfred Edwards, b. June 27, 1849, m. Sept. 20, 1870, Ed- 
mund Francis Cleveland, M. D., of Dundee, 111. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

562. i. Annabel Cleveland, b. Oct. 6, 1871. 

563. ii. May Elizabeth Cleveland, b. Dec. 10, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

507. vi. Increase C. Bosworth, sixth child of Olive Child 
and Alfred Bosworth, b. April, 1812, in Greenfield, N. Y., m. 
about 1844. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

564. i. Alfred Bosworth, b. April 1, 1846, m. Sept. 10, 1872, Eleanor 
Wheeler. 



134 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

565. ii. William Eugene Bosworth, b. Oct. 8, 1848, m. May 12, 1874, 
Ida Woodruff. 
5GG. iii. Abbey L. Bosworth, b. June 1, 1851. 
5G7. it. Henry I. Bosworth, b. Sept. 20, 1854. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

564. i. Alfred Bosworth, eldest child of Increase C. Bos- 
worth, b. April 1, 1S46, m. Sept. 10, 1S72, Eleanor Wheeler. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

568. i. Eleanor Bosworth, b. Sept. 2, 1873. 

569. ii. Neil Bosworth, b. May 25, 1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

565. ii. William Eugene Bosworth, second child of In- 
crease C. Bosworth, m. May 12, 1874, Ida Woodruff. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

570. i. Cyrus Increase Bosworth, b. March 20, 1875. 

571. ii. Charles E. Bosworth, b. Jan. 29, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

48. viii. William Child, eighth child of Increase and Olive 
Pease Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 25, 1777, m. Polly 
Weed, "a pretty orphan girl." He d. 1840, in Jefferson, Hills- 
dale Co., Mich. 

The following obituary notice of Mr. William Child is fur- 
nished by Mrs. Dr. Jones of Chicago, 111., his niece, taken from 
a Michigan paper : 

The death of William Child, Esq., at Jefferson, Hillsdale county, Mich., 
occurred on the 31st of March, 1840, in the sixty-third year of his age. . More 
than merely "he is dead" is due to the memory of Mr. Child. He was con- 
nected with the newspaper press of New York State many years. He served 
his apprenticeship with Solomon Southwick, then Southwick & Barber, 
printers, in Albany. He first conducted a paper in Saratoga Co., in Jeffer- 
son's exciting times, and warmly espoused his cause. He afterwards re- 
moved to Johnstown and conducted the Montgomery Republican, with his 
brother Asa, after which he published the Ballston Spa Gazette. In 1810 
he removed to Seneca Co., N. Y., and for several years directed his attention 
to agricultural pursuits. But his pen was not idle: he contributed freely 
to the columns of one or more papers — Plow Boy among the rest, on agri- 
cultural and other subjects. He was one of the earlier advocates of temper- 
ance, in print, having in 1818 or 1819 prepared a pamphlet called "'A Blow 
at the Bottle," setting forth the alarming effects of the all-prevailing vice, 
which he printed and gratuitously and liberally circulated. In 1823 he 
purchased one of the newspaper establishments in Genesee Co., N. Y., which 
he conducted with great ability till 1837. He also edited an anti-masonic 
paper, which was the cause of great commotion, and made him many ene- 
mies among the masons. It is no more than justice to say that few papers 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 135 

in Western New York were edited with more ability than the Genesee 
Farmer, by William Child. In the fall of 1838, Mr. Child came to Prim 
Yan, and for some months conducted the Democratic Whig; bul finding 
himself too far advanced in years to endure the fatigues and perplexities 
attending the publication of a political paper, he determined to retire from 
the bustle of a printing office and seek in Michigan a quiet retreal for his 
old aire. Soon after his arrival in that state he was appointed one of the 
judges of Ingham Co. He was elected judge with a large majority. His 
friends called upon him in the evening to congratulate him, and staid till a 
late hour. Shortly after retiring he spoke to his wife and said. "lam 
dying." Before a physician could arrive he was speechless, and lived but a 
short time. To say that William Child was an honest man in the full im- 
port of the words is an all-sufficient epitaph, and those who knew him will 
readily hear testimony to its truth. His principles were not purchasable. 
His patriotism had no price. What was right in his view must be done. 
evenatasacrifi.ee. As a husband, parent and friend, he was kind and 
affectionate and warm hearted. So he lived and so he died, suddenly, in a 
moment, as it were, one of the noblest works of his Creator. But when the 
summons came he was ready, long having cherished and professed a well- 
grounded hope of a glorious resurrection and acceptance in and through the 
merits of his Saviour Jesus Christ. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

572. i. Jexnette Child, m. Rev. Mr. Lewis, a Baptist clergyman, in Sen- 
eca Co., X. Y. 

573. ii. William Child: he was a printer and editor: first lived in Lyons, 
Wayne Co , X. Y.: m. : left Seneca Co : it is not known to what place he 
went. 

574. iii. Mary Ann Child, m. a Mr. Sylvester, a druggist who lived, in 
1833, in Waterloo, X. Y. 

575. iv. George Child. 

576. v. Jonx Child. 

577. vi. Faber Child. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

49. ix. Asa Child, sixth son and ninth child of Increase 
and Olive Pease Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, May 21, 1780, 
m. in 1806, Lois Foote of Kingsborough, Fulton Co., X. Y. He 
d. in 1828, in the City of New York. Mrs. C. was b. in 178B, 
and d. in Chicago in 1875, in the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Dr. Jones, get. ninety-two «years. 

Mr. Child was the youngest of the nine children of Captain 
Increase and Olive Pease Child. His life was spent as a jour- 
nalist. He w r as a genuine man, of solid physical proportions, 
and of marked intellectual force. The manliness of Mr. Child 
was conspicuous in his varied relations in life. Just in his 
feelings, conscientious, transparent, his bearing was dignified 
and winning. While serving the public at the head of a weekly 



136 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

journal, lie was actuated by the most honorable motives, and 
gave currency to what he deemed the soundest principles of 
good government. No flattery or denunciation could alter in 
him an honest conviction. By nature unobtrusive and retir- 
ing, he studiously avoided collision with those differing from 
him on questions of public concern. But he was not pusillan- 
imous or craven. Occasions sometimes brought out the grit 
and force of character which lay hidden ordinarily beneath an 
unruffled surface. It is related of him that on one occasion in 
a time of high political excitement, a man who felt himself 
aggrieved at a published article in Mr. Child's paper, went to 
the office, and in bitter, offensive language denounced Mr. 
Child, whose quiet, unruffled temper so increased the anger of 
his assailant as to provoke an assault. A violent blow across 
his shoulders from the cane of the angered man brought Mr. 
Child to his feet, when he seized his assailant and pitched him 
headlong into the street. He could teach his enemies to fear 
his strength and respect his opinions. But he by no means 
lacked magnanimity. He was warm hearted, socially attract- 
ive, sympathetic and benevolent, drawing to his side men of 
like instincts, whom he entertained by his wit and humor. 
But with all his natural excellences, his aims in life were 
prompted by higher impulses than mere natural instincts. The 
power of a Christian faith transformed the inner and controlled 
the outer life. His death in the meridian of life was a public 
loss, and sincerely mourned by his friends and those who knew 
his worth. An obituary notice at the time of his death, writ- 
ten by Eev. Dr. Samuel Hanson Cox, of whose church Mr. 
Child was a member, published in the New York Statesman, is 
a just tribute to his memory, and is worthy of preservation in 
this record : 

DIED.— In New York City, on the 19th of March, 1827, after a distress- 
ing sickness of six months, Asa Child, printer, and formerly editor of the 
Montgomery Republican of Johnstown, N. Y. Mr. Child was in his forty- 
seventh year, and has left a widow and four children to mourn the loss of an 
affectionate husband and tender father. For fourteen years he had been 
a professor of the religion of Jesus Christ, in whom a deep sense of his own 
sinfulness and wants had brought him to trust as his Saviour and his right- 
eousness. Mr. Child always evinced a low and abasing conception of him- 
self. Self-distrust was a trait in his Christian character which resulted 
from an enlightened conviction of the perfidy of the human heart and of 
the real grandeur and excellency of a true disciple. In the first stage of his 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 137 

illness this diffidence seemed oppressive and painful, owing much perhaps 
to the nature of his disease and the medicines administered ; bul in its con- 
eluding scenes the prospects brightened for immortality. His mind rose by 
faith above the ruins it was soon to leave: il acquired calmness, confidence 
and hope in Jesus Christ our Lord. His bodily strength gradually wasted 

away, while his soul serenely waited for the signal of its release He gently 
sunk into the embraces of death, without a struggle or a groan, in the spirit 
of submission and the consolation of hope; leaving to a large circle of rela- 
tives and friends a Legacy, of all the most desirable and precious, the Legacy 
of a Christian hope, a happy death-bed and a good name. "Henceforth 
there is laid up forme a crown of righteousness, which the Lord the righteous 
judge shall give me at that day, and not to me only, but unto all them also 
that love his appearing." 

Mrs. Dr. Jones, a daughter of Mr. Child, says : 

He (Dr. Cox) not knowing the history of my father, did not give particu- 
lars of Ins life. I think my father with his brother William were in Solo- 
mon Southwick's office in Albany, N. Y. I well remember the time when 
politics were running so high in Governor Clinton's day. The Democrats 
had no press in Johnstown at that time, and were obliged to get their print- 
ing done at my father's office. And one night they went in and demolished 
the form that was ready for the press in the morning, and scattered the 
type in every direction. The excitement was so great, we trembled for my 
father's life. Judge Cady of Johnstown was one of the leading spirits of 
the Whig party, and was constantly upholding and defending the rights of 
the. party to which he belonged ; and I believe he was one of Governor Clin- 
ton's personal friends, as he was of my father. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

578. i. Olive Pease Child, b. in Waterloo, Seneca Co., N. Y., in 1808, 
m. in 1843 to Dr. Elijah Jones of Bristol, Mich., moved to Galena, 111., in 
1844, thence to Chicago, 1872, where they now reside; no children. 

5?!). ii. Caroline Child, b. in Johnstown, N. Y., Jan. 18, 1810, d. Oct. 
4, 1813. 

580 iii. Chauncey Child, b. in Johnstown, N. Y., May 17, 1812, d. 1813. 
•581. iv. Caroline Child, 2d, b. in Johnstown, N. Y., Nov. 7, 1815, m. 
Julius Peck. Reside in Zumbrota, Min. 

582. v. William Chauncey Child, b. in Johnstown, Montgomery Co., 
N. Y , Aug. 16, 1817. m. Dec. 184G, Phebe W. Sanford. 

583. vi. Louisa Child, b in Johnstown, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1819, m. in New 
York City to Nelson Stillman. 

584. vii. Asa Baknes Child, b. in Johnstown, N. Y., March. 1824, d. in 
New York City, Feb. 25, 1826. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

582. v. Kev. William Chauncy Child, D. D., second son 
and fifth child of Asa and Lois Foote Child, b. in Johnstown, 
N. Y., Aug. 16, 1817, m.Dcc, 1810, Phebe W. Sanford, dau. of 
Giles Sanford of Albany, N. Y. Dr. Child died Jan. 11, 1876. 

K 



138 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

The youth of Dr. Child gave promise of a future which was 
fully realized in the development of some of the most attract- 
ive and useful characteristics. Nature in the bestowment of 
her gifts upon him was not parsimonious. Inheriting the best 
qualities of intelligent and Christian parents, he commenced 
life under most favorable circumstances, which happily shaped 
his course in maturer years. Gifted with more than ordinary 
intellect, endowed with a disposition of peculiar sweetness, he 
readily secured warm and lasting friendships. His public life 
leaves record of his wisdom and Christian activities. A thor- 
ough education fitted him for positions in the higher spheres 
of life. At twenty-four years of age he was honorably gradu- 
ated from Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. He at once en- 
tered upon his professional studies at the Baptist Theological 
Seminary, in Newton, Mass. The honorary degree of Doctor 
of Divinity was conferred upon him by his Alma Mater. 

His public service was commenced by his settlement as pas- 
tor of the First Baptist Church in Charlestown, Mass. Later 
he was installed over the Baptist Church of Framingham, Mass. 
Some years after, he became connected with the American 
Tract Society, as one of its officers. He was also connected 
with a widely circulated Baptist weekly journal, bearing the 
title of Watchman and Eejiector, published in Boston. Mass. 
The varied experiences of Dr. Child gave to him that complete- 
ness of character which lacked nothing of attractiveness, and 
increased greatly his efficiency in his public career. His esti- 
mable wife, whose companionship contributed much to his 
domestic happiness, as well as his ministerial usefulness, says 
in a note to us, as indicative of the secret of his success in life : 
" My esteemed husband was characterized by an unusually 
genial temperament. He was gentle, affectionate and courte- 
ous. The Eev. Dr. Kirk of Boston, once spoke of him at a 
public meeting of the Tract Society, as being 'a sweet Child 
among us.' The expression was so appropriate it made me re- 
member it. He encouraged the unfortunate, strengthened the 
weak, and caused many to admire the source from whence he 
drew his spiritual comfort." 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

585. i. Anna Geutkude Child, b. March 21, 1851, in Boston, Mass., m. 
April 26, 1871, Samson D. Whitternore. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 139 

586. ii. Willis Saxfokd Child, b. Aug. 2, 1857, m. June 8, 1879, 
Nettie Griffin of Newbury, Kansas. Mr. Child is engaged in stock raising 
in Kansas; resides at Newbury. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

585. i. Anna Gertrude Child, eldest child of Rev. Dr 
Chauncey and Phebe W. Sanford Child, b. in Boston, Mass., 
March 21, 1851, m. April 26, 1871, Samson D. Whittemore of 
Boston. Mass., son of Alvin and Sophia Whittemore of Paris, 
Me. He was b. Dec. 18, 1842, in Paris Hill, Me. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

**** i. Grace Whittemore, b. Sep. 13, 1873. 

**** ii. William Child Whittemore, b. Sep, 6, 1874. 

[Seventh Generation] 

583. vi. Louisa Child, dau. of Asa and Lois Foote Child, 
b. in Johnstown, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1819, m. Feb. 25, 1839. in 
New York City, Nelson Stillman of Colebrook, Ct. Mr. Still- 
man was a merchant. He died Aug. 31, 1871. Mrs. Stillman 
lives in Zumbrota. Minn. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

587. i. Mary L. Stillman, b. in Galena 111.. Dec. 6. 1845. 

588. ii. Chakles Phelps Stillman, b. in Galena, 111., June 25, 1852. 

589. iii. Isabelle Stillman, b. in Galena, 111., July 17, 1857. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

39. iii. Asa Child, second son and third child of Ephraim 
and Mary Lyon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, April 6, 1742, m. 
Nov. 26, 1762, Elizabeth Murray. He d. Oct. 20, 1826, of old 
age; his wife was b. Sept. 15, 1741. d. April 28, 1790. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children : 

590. i. Thede Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. Aug. 24. 1763, d. unm., Jan 
25, 1833. 

591. ii. Dexter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 19, 1766, d. unm., 
April 19, 1833. 

592. iii. Kexsselaer Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 15, 1769, rn. Nov. 
28, 1797, Priscilla Corbin. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

592. iii. Rensselaer Child, b. in Woodstock, Sept. 15, 
1769, m. Nov. 28. 1797, Priscilla Corbin of Thompson, Conn. 

Mr. Child bore the sobriquet of " Master Pans" for his prom- 
inence as a teacher at one time, he Mas a man of much native 
talent, and well educated for the times. He was influential, and 
esteemed for his personal worth, and justly intrusted with pub- 



140 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

lie offices. The following extract is from "H. Ammidown's His- 
torical Collections :" 

Rensselaer Child was largely engaged as surveyor and conveyancer over a 
circuit of country of considerable extent in that vicinity; and as the records 
will show, this class of business, for a number of years among the farming 
commnnity, was monopolized by him ; he was a man of large stature, and 
possessed more than the ordinary powers of intellect. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

593. i. Asa Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 2, 1798, m. Feb. 13, 1826, 
Alice H. Goddard. 

594. ii. Peleg Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 11, 1800, m. 
Sept, 10, 1829, Abigail Bullock. 

595. iii. Lixus Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 27, 1803, m. Oct. 27, 
1827, Berenthia Mason. 

596. iv. Myra Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 18, 1804, d. unm Dec 
15, 1825. 

597. v. Levinia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 4, 1806, m. May 3 
1832, Henry Ingalls. 

598. vi. Clarissa Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 26, 1810, m July 
18, 1841, Charles Chandler. 

599. vii. Priscilla Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 2, 18:2, m. April 
27, 1840, Rensselaer Woodruff. She d. Oct. 10, 1841, she left no children. 

600. viii. Ephraim Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 31, 1818 d Dec 
30. 1827. 

601. ix. Rensselaer Child, Jr., b. in Ct., Woodstock, March 6, 1820, 
m. Aug., 1842, Maria Marey. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

593. i. Hon. Asa Child, eldest child of Bensselaer and 
Priscilla Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 2, 1798, m. 
Feb. 13, 1826, Alice Hart Goddard, dan. of the Hon. Calvin 
Goddard of Norwich, Ct. Judge Goddard was an eminent 
lawyer in Connecticut. He was twice elected to Congress 
when the Federal party was in power, — was for many years 
Mayor of the City of Norwich, Ct,,— Speaker of the House of 
Eepresentatives in the Connecticut Legislature, — Jud«e of the 
Superior Court and of the Supreme Court of Errors in Con- 
necticut, — his wife was the daughter of the Eev. Levi Hart, 
D.D., of Preston, Ct., and granddaughter of the Rev. Joseph 
Bellamy, D.D., of Bethlehem, Ct., who d. May 12, lb32. 

Hon. Asa Child was in stature six feet, of full habit and tine 
personal appearance. Descended from a stock talented and 
influential, his early life commenced with very favorable sur- 
roundings. Possessed of more than ordinary intellectual abili- 
ties, with a thorough education, he became prominent in public 
life. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 141 

He was graduated at Yale College, New Haven, Cl . in 1821, 
pursued his preparatory studies for the law in theofficeof Hon. 
Calvin Goddard of Norwich. Ct He was prominenl as a law- 
yer in Connecticut, afterwards in Baltimore, Maryland, and 
later in New York City. He held at one time the office of 
United States District Attorney for Connecticut, under the ad- 
ministration of President Jackson. He died at Norwich, Ct., 
May LI, 185S. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

602. i. Julia Goddard Child, b. at Norwich, Ct,, April 20, 1828, m. May 
12, 1852, Levi W. Allen. 

603. ii. Edward Child, b. in Hartford, Ct., Oct. 11, 1829, d. Aug. 23, 
1830. 

604. lii. Alice Hart Child, b. in Norwich, Ct., Aug. 23, 1832, d. at Stam- 
ford, Ct., April 27, 1873. 

605. iv. Calvin Goddard Child, b. in Norwich, Ct.. April 6. 1834. m. 
Sept. 16, 1858, Kate Godfrey. 

| Eighth Generation.] 

602. i. Julia Goddard Child, eldest child of Hon. Asa 
and Alice Hart Goddard Child, b. in Norwich, Ct, April 20, 
1825, m. May 12, 1852, Levi W. Allen of South Hadley. Mass. 
He was b. Oct, 12, 1817, and d. May 22: 1S72. His parents 
were Peter and Abby Wright Goodrich Allen of Weathersfield, 
Ct. His mother was granddaughter of Oliver Wolcott, Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut, and one of the signers of the "Declaration 
of Independence."' 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

606. i. Charles Goddard Allen, b. in South Hadley, Mass., July 22, 
1853. d. Feb. 13, 1858. 

607. ii. Abby Wright Allen, b. at South Hadley. Jan. 24, 1856. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

605. iv. Hox. Calvin Goddard Child, second son and 
fourth child of Hon. Asa and Alice Hart Goddard Child, b. in 
Norwich, Ct, April 6. 1834, m. Sept. 16. 1858, Kate Godfrey, 
dan. of Jonathan and Elizabeth Hubbell Godfrey. Mrs. K. G. 
Child| was bom Dec, 12th. 1837. Residence Stamford. Ct 

The prominent positions occupied by Hon. Calvin Goddard 
Child, furnish ample proof of the confidence reposed in him as a 
public servant. His early surroundings were favorable to the 
development of the proper elements of character for success 
and usefulness in life. Graduated with honors at Yale College, 
New Haven, Ct, in 1855. he chose for his profession the law, 



142 BENJAMIN CHILD, OF ROXBTJRY, MASS 



for which his taste and talents eminently fitted him. Since 
1870 he has held the office of United States District Attorney 
for the State of Connecticut ; receiving his first appointment 
from President Grant, and his present appointment from Presi- 
dent Hayes. 

As a citizen, Mr. Child has the respect and esteem of the 
community where his influence contributes largely to promote 
the moral and material interests of his adopted home. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

608. i. Kate Godfrey Child, b. in Norwich, Ct.. Ang. 21, 1859. 

609. ii. Calvin Goddard Child, Jr., b. in Norwich, Ct., Ang. 27, 1862. 

610. iii. William Buckingham Child, b. in Stamford, Ct,, Nov., 1865. 

611. iv. Elizabeth Child, b. in Stamford, Ct., Aug. 20, 1868. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

594. ii. Peleg Child, second child and second son of Eensse 
laer and Priscilla Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 11, 
1800, m. Sept. 16, 1S29, Abigail Bullock. He died Oct. 20, 
1861, on the old homestead of his father. Mrs. Child did not 
long survive him. They had only one child— an adopted 
daughter — who was an amiable and intelligent girl, and the 
light of their dwelling for many years, when the frosts of death 
cut down the flower in its full bloom, and filled their cheerful 
home with sadness. 

Mr. Peleg Child was of a stalwart frame, whose avoirdupois 
would overleap two hundred pounds. In intellect he was much 
above mediocrity ; was fond of reading, and well posted in mat- 
ters of Church and State. He was specially interested in the 
politics of the country — a pronounced Democrat. Kinship was 
no barrier to his onslaught upon his opponents. He was re- 
morselessly severe and unrelenting in his attacks upon men 
and measures opposed to his views. His neighbors were often 
entertained and amused when listening to the earnest debates 
on political questions between him and his brother, the Hon. 
Linus Child, who had as little sympathy with the Democratic 
party as Peleg had for the Old Whig, and later Eepublican. 
Both equally tenacious of their opinions, waxed warm as the 
discussion progressed, till both were ready to adopt the lan- 
guage of Macbeth, 

"Lay on, McDuff, 
And damn'd be him who first cries, Hold! enough!" 














2^ 



AND MIS DESCENDANTS. 143 

The storm of words having expended itself, calm was soon 
restored in each breast, and fraternal relations remained undis- 
turbed. Mr. Child was a valuable member of society, identi- 
fied with all its interests. lie resided on his father's homestead, 
north of Village Corners, in the town of Woodstock, and was a 
thrifty farmer. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

595. iii. Hon. Linus Child, third child and third son of 
Rensselaer and Priscilla Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
Feb. 27, 1803, m. Oct. 27, 1827, Berenthia Mason. 

" Hon. Mr. Child passed his early years on his father's farm, 
with the usual attendance upon the public school. He began 
his preparation for College under the tuition of Rev. Samuel 
Backus of East Woodstock, and completed his preparatory 
studies at Bacon Academy, in Colchester, Connecticut, in the 
autumn of 1820. The following winter he entered Yale Col- 
lege, New Haven, whence he graduated in 1824. Mr. Child 
did not reach the highest rank in college as a scholar ; but for 
honest, actual mastery of the prescribed course, few were before 
him. After he graduated, he became a member of the Law 
School in New Haven, and studied in the office of S. P. Staples, 
He was also under Judge Daggett's instruction. Six months 
later he became a student in the office of Hon. Ebenezer Stod- 
dard, in the west parish of his native town, and after eighteen 
months' study there, was admitted to the bar in Connecticut. 
He spent a year in the office of Hon. George A. Tufts of Dud- 
ley, Mass., when he was admitted to practice in the courts- of 
Worcester county, upon this he established himself in South- 
bridge, Wore. Co., Mass. He resided in Southbridge some 
eighteen years, during this period he was six times elected 
Senator from Worcester county to the State Legislature. In 
1845 he removed to Lowell, and held the agency of one or two 
of the large manufacturing corporations of that city." ' He pos- 
sessed the unusual stature and frame of his father and grand- 
father, was cordial and genial in look and manner. Earnest 
in the promotion of all efforts for the public weal, and promi- 
nent in church and missionary interests, a member of the Amer- 
ican Board of Foreign Missions. In 1862, Mr. Child removed 

1 H. Arnmidown's Historical Collection. 



144 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

to Boston, and resumed his professional duties, associating with 
him his son, Linus M. Child. Hon. Mr. Child died in Hing- 
ham, Mass., after a short illness, on the 26th August, 1870. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

612. i. Myra Berenthia Child, b. in Southbridge, Mass., Nov. 26, 1830. 

613. ii. Linus Mason Child, b. in Sonthbridge, Mass., March 13. 1835, 
in. Oct., 1862, Helen A. Barnes. 

614. iii. Abbie Bullock Child, b. in Southbridge, Mass., April 3, 1840. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

613. h. Linus Mason Child, Esq., second child and only 
son of Hon. Linus and Berenthea Mason Child, b. March 13, 
1835, m. Oct., 1862, Helen A. Barnes. Mr. Child graduated 
at Yale College, New Haven, Ct, in 1855, and is a lawyer in 
Boston, Mass. 

We will preface a brief sketch of Mr. Child, having had no 
personal acquaintance with him, by saying, we have aimed in 
the compilation of this work, on the one hand, to avoid the 
charge of flattery, and on the other, to escape the suspicion 
of detraction. To place on record in a pleasing light every 
member in every branch, truthfully, is our pleasant office. 
From what one says and does, history is made, this is the basis 
of what we say of Mr. Child. From a late " Boston Herald" which 
has just fallen into our hands, (March 26, 1880) containing 
an argument b}^ Linus M. Child, Esq., of Boston, before a 
Massachusetts Legislative Commitee, in support of a petition 
for a charter from the legislature for an elevated railway in 
Boston, mav be gathered some elements of his character, 
which entitle him to be placed in our record in a pleasant light. 
From a cursory perusal of his argument, we are impressed 
with the fact that Mr. Child must have attained to a very com- 
mendable rank in his profession, to have been entrusted with 
matters of so much magnitude. His argument evinces a know- 
ledge of facts which none but a close observer would have 
treasured up. His deductions are logical and forcible, while 
sound judgment, legal acumen, and broad financial views, 
are so clearly evinced as to entitle him to the confidence re- 
posed in him by his clients. Descended from a stock possess- 
ing sturdy physical and mental qualities, and having enjoyed 
the best opportunities for mental culture, and with more than 
ordinary natural abilities, a failure to reach an enviable emi- 
nence, could hardly be looked for. 



AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. 145 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

615. i. IIelex Louisa Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Oct. 9, 1863. 

616. ii. Lints Mason Child, Jr., b. in Boston, Deo. 21, 1865. 

617. iii. Mvra Lend Child, b. in Boston, March. 17, 1870. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

597. v. Lavinia Lyon Child, fifth child and second dau. 
of Rensselaer and Priscilla Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. 
Nov. 1. L808, in. May 3, 1832, Henry Ingalls, who was born in 
Abington, Ct. They moved immediately after their marriage 
to Illinois, and reside now in North Branch Station, Chisago 
count v, Minnesota. Their children were born in Illinois. 

From a letter to me since my work of preparation commenced, 

from Mrs. Lavinia Child Ingalls, we give the following extract, 

which will interest many: 

"Mygreal grandfather, Ephraim Child, was one of seven brothers who 
emigrated from Roxbury, Mass, to Woodstock, Windham county. Ct. I 
think they laid out the town and located themselves in different parts of the 
same." [From other data we think the town had been surveyed and bounded. 
— Ed.] "I have no dates that I can rely upon with regard to this early history. 
I will give to you from memory, what 1 have heard my father and my grand- 
father say. The town of Woodstock, where these stalwart men (we infer 
from other record, they were of large stature) and women, commenced their 
new homes, was seven miles long and five miles wide. It was no prairie 
country, the tall trees had to be leveled. These noble men and women were 
inured day by day to privations and hardships, and their children were trained 
to endurance, like the ancient Spartans. Notwithstanding their laborious 
duties, they did not neglect the education of their children. As soon as 
they got their own cabins tenantable, they built a cabin schoolhouse as near 
central as they could, and started a school for the winter months. The 
children who could make their way through the deep snows, boarded at 
home. Those who could not, boarded at the nearest uncle's. My grand- 
father used to tell me many reminiscences of those early days. My grand- 
father (Asa) and his brother Increase Child, were among those that boarded 
out (Ephraim Child, who married Mary Lyon, was their father.) The aver- 
age number of boarders was from twelve to fifteen, and on stormy nights, 
the number increased to twenty or twenty-five. The "brindle" cow had 
not come in yet, and bean porridge and the brown loaf, were the supper 
and the breakfast, and potatoes roasted in the ashes for the dinner. A great 
round bowl that some of the most ingenious ones had dug out of a big log, 
that would hold a plump pailfull. was the common dish. As many boys 
and girls as could, gathered around this festive board, each with his wooden 
spoon, and when sufficed would give place to others. Thus were laid the 
foundations of a prosperous society.', 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

618. i. Linus Child Ingalls, b. Aug. 16, 1833, d. Nov.. 1833. 

619. ii. Ephraim Child Ingalls, b. Oct. 25, 1835, m. Cordelia . 



14' *> BENJAMIN" CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

620. iii. Henry Francis Ingalls, b. Aug. 28, 1837, d. in Chisago, March 
15, 1863, and is buried at the family home in Minnesota. 

621. iv. Rensselaer C. Ingalls, b. January 15, 1839. 

622. v. Edmund Ingalls, b. June 4, 1841, m. Sept. 29, 1872, Ruth A. 
Pennock. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

619. ii. Ephraim Child Ingalls, second son of Lavinia 
Lyon Child and Henry Ingalls, b. Oct. 25, 1835, m. Cordelia 



[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

623. i. Anna Child Ingalls, b. 1860. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

622. v. Edmund Ingalls, fifth son of Lavinia Lyon Child 
and Henry Ingalls, b. June 4, 1841, m. Sept. 29, 1872, Ruth 
A. Pennock, who was b. Aug. 9, 1 847. Mr. Ingalls is a pro- 
minent business man, residing in Duluth, St. Louis county, 
Minnesota, — a citizen highly esteemed for his activity and in- 
tegrity. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

624. i. Ruth Lavinia Ingalls, b. Oct. 5, 1873. 

625. ii. Lillie Almira Ingalls, b. July 2, 1875. 

626. iii. Florence Elizabeth Ingalls, b. April 13, 1877. 

627. iv. Edmund Ingalls, Jr., b. Aug. 5, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

598. vi. Clarissa Child, sixth child and third dau. of Rens- 
selaer and Priscilla Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 
26, 1810, m. in 1S42, Dr. Charles Chandler. She died March 
13, 1874. Dr. Chandler is a prominent man and physician in 
Chandlerville, Cass county, Illnois. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

628. i. Alice Child Chandler, b. in Chandlerville, 111., Sept., 1842. d. 
May 1, 1852. 

629. ii. John Thomas Chandler, b. in Chandlerville, April 26, 1845. 

630. iii. Linus Child Chandler, b. in Chandlerville, Aug. 9, 1846. 
m. Sarah L. Beane, Sept. 5, 1873. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

629. ii. John Thomas Chandler, second child and eldest 
son of Clarissa Child and Dr. Charles Chandler, b. in Chandler- 
ville, 111., April 26, 1S45, m. 1st, Mary C. Ricard, Oct. 12, 1852, 
m. 2d, Emma Morse, July 1st, 1849, dau. of Almira and John H. 
Morse, and granddaughter of Elias Child, of West Woodstock, 
Connecticut. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 147 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

631. i. Charles Chandler, b. June 27. 1870. 

632. ii. Myetis Child Chandler, b. May 27, 1873. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

630. iii. Linus Child Chandler, third and youngest child 
of Clarissa Child and Dr. Charles Chandler, b. Aug. 9, 1846, m. 
Sept. 5, 1873, Sarah L. Beane of Lisbon, N. H. He graduated 
at Harvard University Law School, Cambridge Mass., June 
1871, is a lawyer in Chandlerville, 111., has been District At- 
torney for Cass County, 111., for four years. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

633. i. Carl Beaxe Chandler, b. Feb. 16, 1876. 

634. ii. William Charles Chandler, b. Feb. 21, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

601. ix. Kensselaer Child, Jr., youngest child, and fifth 
son of Eensselaer and Priscilla Corbin Child, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct, March 6, 1820, m. 1811, Maria Marcy of Southbridge, Mass. 
She was b. July 2, 1821. He died 1861. in the Union Army. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

635. i. Peleg Child, b. in Chandlerville, 111., July 10, 1842. 

636. ii. Dwight Stacy Child, b. in Chandlerville, 111. Jan. 2, 1845. 

637. iii. Mary Lois Child, b. in Chandlerville, 111., Aug. 29, 1847. 

638. iv. Johxsox Corbix Child, b. in Chandlerville, 111., Dee. 1, 1849. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

28. ii. Daniel Child, second child and second son of Eph- 
raim and Priscilla Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Jan. 1, 
1713, m. 1st, Kuth Ammidown, Jan. 1, 17-17, m. 2d, Abigail 
Bridges. He died 1776. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

639. i. Daniel Child, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 8, 1747, d. young. 

640. ii. Zereiah Child, bapt. in Woodstock, Ct.. Dec. 12, 1748. 

641. iii. Stephen Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 27, 1749, m. Sept. 7, 

1778, Mercy Chase. 

642. iv. Abel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 15, 1752, m. March 11, 

1779, Rebecca Allard. 

643. v. Abigail Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct. 

644. vi. Daniel Child, 2d, b. in Woodstock, Ct. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

611. iii. Stephen Child, third child and third son of Dan- 
iel and Ruth Ammidown Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. Nov. 27, 
17-19, m. Sept 7, 177S, Mercy Chase of Sutton, Mass., dan. of 
Daniel and Alice Corbit Chase. She d. Dec. 27, 1835, set 80 
yrs. He d. May 24, 1831, aet. 82 yrs, in Cornish, N. H., to which 



14S BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

town he early emigrated from Woodstock, Ct. Mr. Child was 
one of the early proprietors of Bethel, Vt, but never became a 
resident of the town. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

645. i. Daniel Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Aug. 6, 1779, m. Nov. 11, 
1804, Appama Lyman. 

646. ii. Kuth Harris Child, b. in Cornish, N. EL, Dec. 25, 1780. m. 1804, 
Samuel March Chase, who was b. Nov. 13, 1772, at Walpole, N. H., and d. 
March 11, 1866, at Jubilee, Colorado. 

647. iii. Enos Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Jan. 10, 1783, m. Aug. 23, 
1806, Sarah Bemis. 

648. iv. Ursula Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., June 2, 1785, m. Nov. 2, 
1806, Ebenezer Cummings. 

649. v. Alice Child, b. April 2, 1787, in Cornish, N. H., in. Dec. 24, 
1812, Bela Chase. 

650. vi. Eudocia Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Jan. 27, 1789, m. June 8, 
1806, Benjamin Freeman. 

651. vii. Araminta Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Sept. 3, 1791, d. Oct. 6 
1791. 

652. viii. Stephen Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Aug. 30, 1792, m. March 
20, 1S22, Eliza Atwood. 

653. ix. Mercy Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., May 10, 1794, m. March 18. 

1819, Abraham Chase Palmer, at Langdon, Vt. 

654. x. Jane Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Nov. 4, 1797, m. March 12, 

1820, Jacob Johnson Safford. 

655. xi. Prudentia Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., March 7, 1800, d. Aug. 
25, 1802. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

645. i. Daniel Child, eldest child of Stephen and Mercy 
Chase Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Aug. 6, 1779, m. Appama 
Lyman, Nov. 11, 1804. She was the dau. of Josiah and Eunice 
Tiffany Lyman, and niece of Rev. Elijah Lyman, a well known 
clergyman of the Congregational church of that period. She 
was b. Sept. 15, 1783, at Lebanon, N. H., d. in Bethel, Vt, 
Sept. 21, 1854. He d. Jan. 7, 1853. They had nine children. 

Daniel, with his brother Enos, early settled in the town of 
Bethel, Vt. When a young man he went to Brookfield, Vt, 
and started a mercantile business. After marrying, he settled in 
Rochester Hollow, Vt, as a farmer. Here he made a beginning 
in the wilderness. In the autumn of 1818 he moved to Bethel, 
Vt., where he lived until his death, in 1853. His place was the 
home of the Child family during his life. Mr. Child died very 
suddenly, dropping dead upon the street in Bethel village. He 
built the house on the home farm in 1827. Illustrative of the 



AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. I4l> 

times, the contract for building the house was let to two parties 
for a specified sum, including what rum they could drink ! Two 
of the boys were deputed to bring the rum from the village, 
which they did in an old-fashioned gallon measure, carried on a 
stick between them, making a trip almost daily! During his 
life in Bethel. Mr. Child was a man of some prominence in local 
public affairs, lie was the clerk of the district in which he 
lived ; clerk of theEpiscopal church of which he was a member, 
and was very careful and methodical in making and preserving 
all the records with which he had anything to do. His care in 
these respects is specially noticeable, and it is owing to it that 
the town and church are now in possession of some valuable 
records of an early date. He was town clerk for some years. 
He was well known as a surveyor of lands in all these parts, and 
he knew better than any one else all the old land marks, in 
fact, his word came to be authority in all such matters ; and the 
records of surveys, "notes" and ''held books 1 ' which he left are 
even now appealed to, to settle the location of disputed corners 
and lines. He was careful to preserve all his papers, and when 
he died, left a large quantity which he had accumulated. The 
Woodstock (Vt.) Mercury, used to be the local paper. Mr. Child 
was accustomed to visit the post office on each Friday, take the 
papers belonging to the subscribers in the north part of the 
town, carry them up to the church on Sunday morning, and be- 
fore service scatter them through the pews for their respective 
owners. And so constant and regular was he in the performance 
of this duty, that it came to be associated in the mind of the 
postmaster as an inseparable part of Friday, and in the minds 
of the subscribers who received their papers in this way, an in 
separable part of Sunday. It nearly answered the purpose of 
a calendar. ' 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

656. i. Emily Mary Frances Child, b. at Rochester, Vt. Aug. 23, 1806, 
in. March 1, 1829, Richard W. Roche. 

657. ii. Laura Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., Nov. 11, 1808, m. Dec. 28, 
1826, Jay Wilson. 

658. hi. Doct. Abel Lyman Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., Aug. 9, 1810, m. 
1st, Oct. :>, is:;:;, Margaret Tozier; in. 2d, Dec. 25, 1847, Rebecca Coates. 
m. 3d, April 25, 1849, Eliza Hampton; in. 4th, Aug. 16, 1856. Cora Wood- 
ward. 

1 The above is from a printed record furnished by Dr. Abel L. Child, a son. 



150 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBUKY, MASS. 

659. iv. Philander C. Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., July 13, 1812, d. 
March 12, 1816. 

660. v. Eliza A. Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., July 16, 1814, in. Seth 
Sterling. 

661. vi. Elijah Lyman Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., July 31, 1816, m. June 
26, 1838, Eliza B. Blanchard. 

662. vii. Lucy C. Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., June 23, 1818, m. Jan. 23, 
1841, Levi Devoll, at Albany, N. Y. He was accidentally shot. They left 
no children. 

663. viii. Rev. Stephen R. Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., Dec. 31, 1819, in. 
Nov. 23, 1849, Mary S. Belcher, at Brimfteld, 111. He was an Episcopal 
clergyman. He d. at Decatur, 111., 1854. They had three children, names 
are not given. 

664. ix. Unity R. Child, b. at Bethel, Vt., March 1, 1822, m. Oct. 30' 
1844, Charles W. Lillie. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

656. i. Emily Mary Frances Child, eldest child of Daniel 
and Appama Lyman Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., Aug. 23, 1806, 
m. March 1, 1829, Richard W. Roche of Boston, Mass. He d. 
at Chicopee, Mass., Oct. 16, 1839. She d. of a disease sup- 
posed to be yellow fever, communicated from bales of cotton 
when opened in the mills in that place. Mr. and Mrs. Roche 
were Romanists in their religious belief. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

665. i. Joanna Roche, b. in Charlestown, Mass , 1830, now Lady Abbess 
in a convent in Montreal, Canada. 

666. ii. Constantine Roche, b. at Cabotsville, Mass., now in California. 

667. iii. Fkanklin Roche, b. at Cabotsville, Mass., now in Missouri. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

657. ii. Laura Child, second child and second dau. of Dan- 
iel and Appama Lyman Child, b. in Rochester, Vt., Nov. 11, 
1808, m. Dec. 28, 1826, Jay Wilson. Reside in Bethel, Vt. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

668. i. James J. Wilson, b. 1831, m. Jane Flynn of Bethel. Vt., has 
seven children, but no names given. Mrs. Jane Flynn Wilson died, and 
Mr. Wilson married Mary L. McCoy of Louisiana. Mr. Wilson is an attor- 
ney by profession, conversant with the affairs of state, was elected from 
Windsor Co., Vt., to the state senate. He resides in Bethel, Vt. 

669. ii. March Chase Wilson, b. May 4, 1834, d. in 1852. 

670. iii. Oliver S. Wilson, b. Sept. 13, 1838. 

671. iv. Laura C. Wilson, b. Oct. 30, 1840, d. June 16, 1862. 

672. v. Dudley F. Wilson, b. March 25, 1844, d. Feb. 3, 1854. 

673. vi. Harriet E. Wilson, b. Aug. 13, 1849. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 151 

[Seventh Generation.] 

658. iii. Dr. Abel L. Child, third child and eldest son of 
Daniel and Appama Lyman Child, h. in Rochester, Vt., Aug. 
9, 1810, m. 1st, Oct, 3, 1833, Margaret Tosier, at Manchester, 
Ind., in. 2d, Dec. 25, 1847, Rebecca Coates, at Cincinnati, O., 
m. 3d, April 25, 1849, Eliza Hampton, at Munroe, 0., m. 4th, 
Aug. 10, 1856, Cora Woodward, at Walnut Hills, 0. 

Dr. Child left Vermont in the summer of 1833, and com- 
menced the study of medicine at Manchester, Ind.; thence he 
went to Cincinnati and attended lectures in the old Ohio Medi- 
cal College, and afterwards practiced, for several years in Indiana. 
In 1830 he left his profession and took charge of the Ports- 
mouth, O., public schools, as superintendent. In 1848, he re- 
moved to Cincinnati and took charge of the Cincinnati High 
School (colored). In 1850 he became principal of the Walnut 
Hills High School. In the spring of 1857 he removed to 
Nebraska, bought land, and became a farmer, at the same time 
commenced metallurgic observations and reporting to the 
Smithsonian Institute. These observations are still continued, 
and reports made to the U. S. Signal Office. In 1867 he was 
elected a member of a constitutional convention of the state, 
and in 1869, elected probate judge of Cass county, which office 
he still holds (1880). 

The experiences of Dr. Child have been in many respects 
most remarkable. His life has been one of great activity. Fol- 
lowing the bent of an inquisitive mind, he has seen and known 
much of men and things. The natural force of character and 
versatility of talent which have marked his career have been 
important elements in reaching results. As a pioneer, future 
generations will read his history with interest and profit. His 
reminiscences of the town of Plattsmouth and county of Cass, 
in Nebraska, contained in a little pamphlet entitled "Centennial 
History of Plattsmouth City," &c, are instructive and amusing, 
exhibiting much of wit and humor in the author; and as a book 
of reference, will always be valuable. His indomitable courage 
and power of endurance are striking features in his history, and 
such as are always prime elements in pioneer life. Of boldness 
and daring in adventure, we have a thrilling illustration in a 
narrative from his pen. which we here insert: 



1 52 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

A REMINISCENCE OF NIAGARA FALLS, OR. THE OLD INDIAN LADDER. 

During a residence of several months at Niagara Falls, in the summer of 
1832, much of my time was spent in wandering about, above, below and un- 
der the Falls, searching out the various grand views, recesses and curiosi- 
ties of the vicinity. One morning in June I had descended the old spiral 
stairway to the foot of the American Fall, and after a time spent among the 
rocks and spray, was about to return, when a legend occurred to me of an 
old Indian ladder, said by some to exist, or to have existed in former times, 
by which ascent had been made from the river to the top of the cliffs above 
(some 200 feet), and to be located from one-half mile to one mile below the 
Falls. The existence of such a ladder had been disputed in my hearing 
several times by the oldest residents, and often sought for from the cliffs 
above by others as well as by myself, but nothing had been discovered indi- 
cating its existence. 

The search from below on the river bank had not been attempted, as it 
was held to be impossible for a human being to pass down the river between 
the cliffs and water, as in places the rocks projected to the very margin oi 
the rapid tumultuous torrent, and the portions where the solid walls re- 
ceded were filled either with broken, jagged rocks or densly matted with 
thorny bushes and brush, living and dead, forming a barrier hardly pene- 
trable to any animal larger than a squirrel or rabbit. 

With but very little thought or consideration. 1 resolved at once to attempt 
the impassable ( ?) and search from below. I soon leamedf rom sore experience 
that the difficulties of the path had not been magnified. It was indeed a 
fearfully hard road to travel. But I persevered till the certainty of the 
fearful track to be retraced, in case of retreat, overshadowed the possibili- 
ties of the advance. I therefore continued to press forward At length, 
after, to me, a very long half mile's travel, I was rewarded with a sight 
of something like a ladder. It looked ancient and much decayed, many of 
the rounds broken out and gone." It was some 25 feet long, and stood with 
its top resting against a shelf or table projected from the face of the perpen- 
dicular wall, extending some fifty or sixty feet above it. 

The ladder seemed weak and dangerous, and the rough and ragged rocks 
about its foot argued no pleasant bed in case of even a slight fall. But it 
was the ladder or retreat; and, with some hesitation, I took to the ladder. 
With bated breath — touching each round so carefully — changing from one 
side to the other, as the one seemed more decayed, or cracked under my 
weight, I slowly worked my way up. It was with extreme difficulty that I 
passed over the missing rounds, and off from two which broke under my 
feet without shocks and jars which might send the ladder and myself in a 
crash to the rocks below. But over all I reached the top and could then see 
that the shelf against which the ladder rested was from twelve to fifteen 
inches in width. To the right it decreased in width till, at some twenty 
feet distance, it disappeared. On the left it ran with unequal widths from 
ten to twelve inches, about the same distance, and was then lost behind a 
sharp angle of the rock. Escape to the right there was none : to the left — 
could I possibly succeed in reaching the angle! was there a path beyond? 
If not, why was this ladder ever placed here? The presumption was in 
favor of a passage, and I would try it. But to leave the ladder for an up- 
right position on the shelf, as also to traverse this narrow ledge, with the 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 153 

perpendicular rock above crowding you off, when once on it, was a work of 
peril. A slight touch of the rock above might upsel my balance, when 
nothing could save me from the ragged rocks twenty-five feel below. That 
every movement was calculated, timed and measured previous to actual 
motion, I need not say. 

At length my feet rested on the shelf. And, then, as I gradually raised 
myself, a part of the shelf under my foot crumbled and fell. I also fell, 
with my face to the shelf. But in my struggle to save myself I pressed my 
foot so hard against the ladder that it was displaced, and with a terrific 
crash it lay in fragments on the rocks below, leaving me with all retreat ut- 
terly cut off. Completely exhausted and unnerved, I lay like one dead for 
several minutes, when the question of a passage around the angle of the 
rock occurred to my mind, and instantly rebraced every nerve and muscle. 
Cautiously I raised myself on to my hands and knees and crept along a few 
feet, till the shelf became so narrow that there was not room for both knees. 
Slowly and carefully I rose to my feet, grasping with thumb and finger ends 
upon the small projections, crevices, &c, of the rocks above me, and ad- 
vancing one foot a few inches and then bringing the other up behind, as 
there was no room to pass one by the other. 

Thus at last I reached the dreaded angle. But there, the light blazed out 
upon me. Around the angle, and a couple of steps, and I was lying at rest 
on a beautiful but slightly inclined greensward. Luxurious as my couch 
was, it was not devoid of thorns, as I could not forget that I had yet some 
one hundred and seventy-five feet more to climb, and some barrier must be 
interposed, somewhere, else this place would have been discovered from 
above. I noticed while lying here, for the first time, that my finger ends 
were badly cut, by the intensity of my grip on the rocks over my narrow 
path. 

My anxiety increasing as to what I had still to encounter above, I arose 
and commenced my upward way. Evidently I was on -a large slide of for- 
mer days, arrested in its movement. On a very crooked track I found no 
difficulty in ascending to about twenty feet from the top of the cliffs, but 
here I met the apprehended barrier, in a solid perpendicular wall of about 
twenty feet. I followed this wall to the right till the slide joined it in a 
sheer descent of one hundred feet. No escape there. Then to the left with 
a like result, only fifty feet worse. The Old Bastile of France was not a 
safer prison. The remains of another old ladder, utterly decayed, showed 
how formerly travelers had ascended. But hold, a ray of light produces a 
throb of hope. In the angle produced by the wall and slide on the left, 
grows a small white birch tree, with the roots inserted partly in the crevices 
of the wall, and partly in the earth of the slide. It rose some thirty feet, 
leaning from both the wall and the slide at an angle of some ten degrees, 
and over the fearful abyss below of one hundred and fifty feet. Its diame- 
ter at the foot was some four or five inches. Again, an old log of about 
one foot in diameter (but how long I could not see), projected from the 
slightly sloping bank above, the lower end nearly reaching the white birch 
tree, some eighteen feet from the root. Here was a bridge that a squirrel 
might pass over in safety, but could 1? 

My weight upon the tree must bear it down, and away from the end of 
the log, and probably out of reach of it, and suspend me over the terrible 

L 



154 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBURY, MASS. 

abyss below. No, no! I could never travel over that road. But, what then? 
What other resource? There was really no other way of escape from my 
prison, and to remain there, was only a long lingering death from starva- 
tion. I well knew that the road from the Falls, down the river to the whirl- 
pool, passed a full half mile distant. It was a lonely, out of the way place, 
and hardly a chance of a human being coming within reach of the sound of 
my voice at any time. 

A full examination of all my resources, showed clearly that the only choice 
there was in the matter, was death by starvation, long and cruel, or a sud- 
den, yet fearful one, on the rocks below. If I chose the latter, there was a 
barely possible chance of escape. The love of life was then strong with me, 
and the almost infinitely small chance for it, sent me to the foot of the tree. 
The small limbs were frequent, and up I climbed. ]\Iy anticipations were 
realized. By the time I was up twelve feet on the tree, it had bent over so 
as to be entirely out of reach of the log above, and one glance into the fear- 
ful depths below induced such giddiness, sickness, and intense fear, that it 
was with the utmost difficulty that I held to the tree, as I hastened to the 
ground. I dropped to the earth in a dull, stupified despair. All hope was 
dead. ...... 

I have no recollection of any process of thought or reason. I knew noth- 
ing — but a sensation of utter hopelessness. How long 1 lay in this state, I 
know not, time was forgotten. But at length I found myself upon my feet, 
and making for the tree again ; why, or for what, I knew not. Simply as a 
machine I went to the tree, and recommenced its ascent, Devoid of all fear 
or nervousness, I reached the height of the log on the bank, now some 
three feet from my extended hand and arm. Next I found myself swaying 
the tree back and forth, to bring it within reach of the log — over and over, 
down and down I went toward that awful abyss, again and again before the 
reaction brought me within reach of the log. As 1 reached it, I threw my 
arm over it, and thus for an instant I hung. The recoil of the tree, assisted 
by my weight, was pulling upon my arm with a force it could not endure. 
At that instant a full consciousness of my position and its fearful peril broke 
upon me, and as full a sense that then and there was no time or place for 
thought or consideration. I let the tree loose, and with a desperate effort, 
threw my other arm over the log, and then, after two fruitless efforts, locked 
my feet around the log above my hands. 

And then I felt that the log was slowly sliding down over the bank. Yes 
— it was surely going— I could feel it and see it move— it was all but over — 
that would be— annihilation — . All fear, fatigue, and nervous weakness 
left me, I was at perfect ease. Time again utterly failed me. How long I 
was thus suspended I have no knowledge. But at last, I became conscious 
that the log had stopped. I could see where it had rubbed and ground 
along on the edge of the rock about a foot, and then caught on a knot. 
Then I tried to move myself up toward the bank, but found, suspended as 
I was, and with the inclination of the log (some ten degrees), I could not, 
I must get on top of the log— and I did so — but how I have no recollection. 
Prom thence I reached the bank and fell upon the grass. There memory 
ceased, and all was blank. .... As consciousness slowly 
returned, 1 began to realize that if I had a body, it was utterly dead. I 
was surrounded by the blackest of darkness, and could neither move or stir 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 155 

any member of my body, if I had one. By degrees I recalled the perilous 
scenes through which [had passed, and a somewhal indefinite conclusion 
followed that by some means I had fallen from the cliff, and thai the body 

was dead. 

l!nt the old habit of controlling the body through the mind was still 
strong, and in my continued efforts in that direction, one of my bands fell 
from my body to the ground, producing a cold and wel sensation. This 
produced a shock and upset my conclusion as to my death, and 1 worked 
away more vigorously to get control over the body. In a few minutes, I so 
far succeeded as to find myself lying on the wet grass. With still further 
effori 1 found a log near by, lying much as 1 recollected the one did on 
which I reached the bank, and knowing that the higher end lay from the 
precipice, and in the direction of the road, I followed it on ray hands and 
knees to the end, and then succeeded in getting on to my feel and started 
in the direction of the road. 

After several mishaps, from contact with brush, stumps, trees, iVe . and 
several falls, with the returning circulation, my sight also began to return. 
I began to see stars, but of course no sun. The day had passed and it was 
some time in the night. At last I found the road, and reached my board- 
ing house at the Falls, at 2 o'clock a. m. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children. 

[By Margaret Tozier.] 

674. i. Lucy Marion Child, b. at Manchester, Indiana, Aug. 12, 1834, 
m. July 4, 1853, Washington Walts. 

675. ii. Rollix Almaxzor Child, b. at Manchester, Ind., Aug. 6, 1836, 
d. same day. 

676. iii. Philander Ronald Child, b. at Campbell, Ind , Nov. 10, 1837, 
m. Jan.. I860, Lizzie Zeodorski. 

677. iv. Laura Almira Child, b. at Portsmouth, 0.. July 11, 1840, m. 
Mar. 14, 1856, William Simmons. 

678. v. Everard Seymour Child, b. at Portsmouth. 0., Jan. 7, 1842, in. 
Aug. 6, 1865, Hannah E. Thorndike. 

679. vi. Ella Olivia Child, b. at Portsmouth, O..Dec. 14, 1843, d. June 
19, 1845. 

[By Rebecca Coates Child.] 

680. vii. Harry Prestox Child, b. at Clermont Phalanx, 0., Oct. 2, 
1848; for some ten years past yard master of Kansas City, Mo., stock yards. 

[By Eliza Hampton Child.] 

681. via. Julia E. Child, b. Nov. 10, 1850. at Walnut Hills, O., m. June 
29, 1879, James W. Thomas, at Plattsmouth, Xeb. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

674-. i. Lucy Maeion Child, eldest child of Dr. Abel Ly- 
man and Margaret Tozier Child, b. in Manchester, Ind., Aug. 
12, 1834, m. at Harmonia, Ind , July 4. 1853, Washington 
Walts. She d. in Oregon, Feb. 12, 18 65. Mr. Walts resides 
in Oregon with his two sons. 



156 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 
082. i. Alonzo L. Walts, b. at New Albany, Inch, 1854, ch 1857. 

683. ii. Henry Walts, b. at Sugar Grove, Intl., Aug. 10, 1856. 

684. iii. Marcus Walts, b. at Glentlale, Neb., Jan. 1860. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

676. iii. Philander Ronald Child, third child and sec- 
ond son of Dr. Abel L. and Margaret Tozier Child, b. at Camp- 
bell, Ind., Nov. m 1837, m. Jan., 1860, at St. Louis, Mo., Liz- 
zie Zeodorski. He was engaged in a railroad tunnel in Cali- 
fornia, in April, 1875, since which time he has not been heard 
from ; it is presumed he is dead. Me served in the late civil 
war in the Union army. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

685. i. Michael Child, b. at St. Louis, Mo., 1861. 

686. ii. Benon Child, b. at St. Louis, Mo., 1863. 

687. iii. Willie Child, b. at Glentlale, Neb., 1866. 

These three children are living in Saunders Co., Nebraska. 
[Eighth Generation.] 

677. iv. Laura Almira Child, fourth child and second 
dau. of Dr. Abel L. and Margaret Tozier Child, b. in Ports- 
mouth, 0., July 11, 1840, m. March 11, 1856, William Sim- 
mons, at Lafayette, Ind. They reside at Lafayette, Ind. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

688. i. George Simmons, b. at Lafayette, Intl., April 22, 1858, d. same day. 

689. ii. Henry L. Simmons, b. at Lafayette, Ind , Feb. 1, 1860, d. Aug. 
10. 1864, at St. Louis. Mo. 

690. iii. Lucy E Simmons, b. at Lafayette, Intl., May 13, 1863, d. Feb. 
13, 1865. 

691. iv. William E. Simmons, b. at Lafayette, Ind, March 24, 1865. 

692. v. Minnie Isabel Simmons, b. at Lafayette, Ind., Jan. 24. 1869. 

693. vi. Margaret Janette Simmons, b. in Glentlale, Neb., July 20, 1872. 

694. vii. Charles Lester Simmons, b. in Glentlale, Jan. 22, 1875. 

695. viii. Earl Chase Simmons, b. at Lafayette, Intl., Sept. 18, 1877. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

678. v. Bverard Seymour Child, fifth child and third 
son of Dr. Abel L. and Margaret Tozier Child, b. in Ports- 
mouth, O., Jan. 7, 1812,' m. Aug. 6, 1865, Hannah E. Thorn- 
dike. Reside at Afton, Neb. Mr. Child served through the 
civil war ; is postmaster and county surveyor. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 
696 i. Lorena P. Child, b. June 2, 1866, at Glentlale, Neb. 
697. ii. Earl L. Child, b. Feb. 15, 1869, at Glentlale, Neb. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 157 

[Seventh Generation.] 

660. v. Eliza Augustus Child, fifth child and third dau. 
of Daniel and Appama Lyman Child, b. in Rochester, Vt.. 
July 6, 1814, m. about 1813. Seth Sterling. 

[Eighth Generation.] "Children: 

698. i. Maurice Sterling, b. in Warren, Vt.. 1844. m. Elraina Freeman 
of Warren. 

699. ii Emily Sterling, b. in Warren, Vt . 184?, m. Godfrey Sunnier of 
Braintree, Vt. Live- in Warren. 

TOO. iii. George Sterling, b in Warren, Vt.. 1849. in. Mary Bueklin. 
Lives in Warren. Vt . 

701 iv. Laura Sterling, b. in Warren. Vt . 1854. in. Win. Prosser of 
Hancock. Vt. 

70-2. v. Ida Sterling, b. 1859. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

661. vi. Elijah Lyman Child, sixth child and third son 

of Daniel and Appama Lyman Child, b. in Rochester, Vt, July 

31, 1816, in. June '20, 1838, Elizabeth Blanchard. at Woodstock, 

Vt. He lives in Bethel. Vt. a merchant there for thirty years. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

703. i. Elizabeth Janette Child, 1). July 1. 1840. lives in Bethel. Vt. 

704. ii. Daniel Lyman Child, b. June 25, 1852, lives in Bethel, Vt. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

661. ix. Unity R. Child, ninth child and fifth daughter of 
Daniel and Appama Lyman Child, b. in Bethel, Vt.. March 1, 
1S22, m. Oct 30, 1844, Charles W. Lillie. at Bethel. Vt. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

705. i Juliette A. Lillie, b. in Bethel, Vt . Dec. 3. 1845. m. Sept. 17. 
1863. E. C. Belt. Reside at Corning, Iowa. 

706. ii. Charles W. Lillie, Jr., b, in Bethel, Vt., April 7. 1849, d. May 
5 1863. 

707. iii. Elbert Ray Lillie, b. in Bethel, Vt.. April 11. 1851. d. in Cal- 
ifornia, Aug. 18, 1875. 

708. iv. Samuel Lillie. Ii. in Bethel, Vt,, Dec. 3, 1853, d. same day. 

709. v. Daniel Lillie, b. in Sugar Grove, Ills., Nov. 17, 1854, d. Oct. 6. 
1860. 

710. vi. Lizzie A. Lillie, b. in Hazleton, Iowa, Dec, 1857. 

711. vii Edwin Lillie, b. in Hazleton, Iowa, Mar. 1, 1862. 

712. viii. Francis G. Lillie, b. in Independence, Iowa, Feb. 14. 1865. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

647. iii. Exos Child, third child and second son of Stephen 
and Mercy Chase Child, b. in Cornish, N. H.. Jan. 10, 1783, 
m. Aug. 23, 1800, Sarah Bemis, who was b. in Spencer, Mass., 
Sept. 3, 1783. He removed from Cornish to Bethel. Vt., 1812 
or 1813, where he d. Jan. 30, 1839. 



158 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation] Children: 

713. i. Abigail Mart Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., May. 24, 1807, m. Jan. 
18, 1829, Benjamin Bice of Royalton, Vt. They lived in Royalton. He d. 
May 12. 1867: she d. April 25," 1868. 

714. ii. W. Chase Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., June 24, 1808, d. March 13, 
1813. 

715. iii. Alice Corbit Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., Feb. 26, 1810, m. 1839, 
Hiiara Twichell. 

716. iv. Mercy Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., Oct. 12, 1811. m. May 4, 1833, 
Justin Lilly. 

717. v. Asaph Bemis Child, b. in Bethel, Vt, Aug. 22, 1813, m. Jan. 7, 
i840, Eusebia Sabine. 

718. vi. Sarah Child, b. in Bethel, Vt.. Aug. 17, 1815, m. Sept. 14,1854, 
John Xasely, in Randolph, Vt. She d. Sept. 18, 1856. 

719. vii Ruth Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., Nov. 22, 1817, m. Sept. 12, 1837, 
Win. Bass. 

720. viii. Rachel Dawson Child, b. in Bethel. Vt., Nov. 4, 1819, d. 1822. 

721. ix Enos Dennison Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., May 7, 1822, m. June 
7. 1846, Ellen Williams, b. April 14, 1829. Settled in Ironton, , in 1844, 
and died there. Xo children. 

722. x Rachel Child, 2d, b. in Bethel. Vt . June 25. 1824, m. May 7. 
1844, Dr. David G. Williams. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

715. iii. Alice Corbit Child, third child and second dau. 

of Enos and Sarah Bemis Child, b. in Bethel, Vt, Feb. 26, 

1810, m. 1S39. Hiram Twichell of Bethel, b. March 3, 1813. 

Four children. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
723 i. Alice Child Twichell, b. in Bethel. Vt , March 27, 1840. 

724. ii. Mary Janette Twichell, b in Bethel, Vt,, July 18, 1842. 

725. iii. Sarah Twichell, b. in Bethel, Vt., Oct. 23. 1843. 

726. iv. Frank Twichell, b. in Bethel, Vt., Sept. 7, 1848. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

716. iv. Mercy Child, fourth child and third dau. of Enos 
and Sarah Bemis Child, b. Oct, 12, 1811, in Bethel, Vt, m. 
May 4, 1833, Justin Lilly, b. Oct. 5, 1S07. She d. Feb. 27, 
1838. Lived in Barnard, Vt 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

727. i. Dudley Child Lilly, b. Oct, 19, 1834. 

728. ii. Alice Child Lilly, b. June 7, 1836. 

729. iii. Daniel Lilly, b. Jan. 31, 1838. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

717. v. Asaph Bemis Child, fifth child and second son of 
Enos and Sarah Bemis Child, b. in Bethel, Vt, Aug. 22, 1813, 
m. Jan. 7, 1840, Eusebia Sabine, who was born Feb. 20, 1813, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 159 

d. Sept 15, 1873. Mr. Child d. March, 1879, in the 66th year 
of his age. 

Soon after thebi^th of Asaph Bemis Child, his parents moved 
into Bethel, Vt., then comparatively new and wild, where he 
led a truly pioneer life. Asaph Bemis grew to be a stalwart 
boy by the exercise of his muscular powers in helping to 
bring into culture the new home. He came to be a power, ere 
he had reached the age of twenty-one. in clearing the farm and 
sustaining the household. At an early day the elements of a 
strong mind, and a robust constitution, began to be developed. 
While his hands were industriously and efficiently employed in 
the field, his leisure hours were spent in reading and study, till 
his knowledge of the primary branches of education was suffi- 
cient to qualify him to teach a common school. For several 
winters, while in his minority, he taught school, and returned 
to work on his father's farm in the summer. After reaching 
his majority, he spent two winters at the Academy in Kandolph, 
Vt, boarding with his uncle, Judge Chase, Chief Justice of the 
State of Vermont; working for his board. So faithful and 
efficient was he, that his uncle declared he accomplished more 
than any other laborer on the farm, and that he was so studi- 
ous he kept his standing in his class. Such was the force of 
character, and the unflagging mental application exhibited at 
this period, foreshadowing what the future would be in attain- 
ments and efficiency. 

Having passed his twenty-second year, and acquired such 
knowledge as his limited means would allow, he commenced 
the study of medicine, and attended a course of medical lectures 
at Dartmouth College, N". H. Afterwards he attended a medi- 
cal course in Boston, Mass., when he returned to Bethel, Vt, 
and read and practiced with Dr. Alfred Page of that town, and 
gained much favor among the people for skill and urbanity. 
To complete his medical studies he went to Burlington, Vt, 
and graduated, receiving his medical diploma from that insti- 
tution. His thoroughness as a student cannot be questioned. 
But he was not satisfied with the medical practice. He went 
to Boston and connected himself with the office of Messrs. Ellis 
k Dana, leading dentists in that city. For two vears he indus- 
triously applied himself, and became a skillful dentist. He 
then opened an office of his own, and proved himself to be one 



160 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

of the most popular dentists of the city. Naturally of a spec- 
ulative turn of mind, he began at this period to write and pub- 
lish articles on questions of public interest. His first disserta- 
tion was a treatise on the "Care and Preservation of the Teeth." 
These literary efforts led to the publication of a monthly mag- 
azine called The Athenaeum. He was much interested in the 
subject of education, and for some time was an active member 
of the Public School committee of Boston. He finally became 
much interested in the new philosophies and spiritualistic man- 
ifestations, so called. In support of these he was very earnest, 
and is thought to have made many converts. 

The development of his philosophies is before the public, and 
the fruits will be judged of variously, as the opinions of men 
approximate to or diverge from his own. 
[Eighth Generation.! Children : 

730. i. John Theodore Child, b. June 13, 1841, m. June 4, 1863, Sarah 
Gerry. 

731. ii. Henry Child, b. Jan. 16, 1847, in Boston, Mass. 

732. iii. Charles Edward Child, b. July 31, 1853, in Boston, Mass. 

[Eighth Generation.! 

730. i. John Theodore Child, eldest child of Asaph Bemis 

and Eusebia Sabine Child, b. June 13, 1841, m. June 4, 1863, 

Sarah Gerry. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

733. i. Sarah Gertrude Child, b. 1864. 

734. ii. Madaline Elizabeth Child, b. 1867. 

735. iii. Ruth Lavinia Child, b. Dec. 7, 1868. 

736. iv. Bernice Theodore Child, b. Feb. 1. 1872. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

719. vii. Ruth Child, seventh child and fifth dau. of Enos 
and Sarah Bemis Child, b. in Bethel, Vt , Nov. 22, 1817, m. 
Sept. 12, 1837, Wra. Bass of Braintree, Vt, b. March 14, 1810. 
She died at Jefferson City, Mo., 1861. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

737. i. Wm. Edward Bass. b. Aug. 16, 1838, in Braintree, Vt. 

738. ii. Enos Child Bass, b. in Brainti\e, Vt , July 26, 1840. 

739. iii. Dudley Chase Bass, b. in Braintree, Vt , Aug. 10, 1842 

740. iv. Sarah Agnes Bass, b. in Braintree, Vt.. Dec. 2, 1844. 

741. v. Charles Henry Bass, b. in Braintree, Vt,, July 23, 1848. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

722. x. Rachel Child, 2d, tenth child and seventh dau. of 
Enos and Sarah Bemis Child, b. in Bethel, Vt., June 25, 1S24, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 161 

m. May 7. 1844, Dr. Gardner Williams. She d. May 17. 1868, 
in Boston. Mass. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

742. i. Eusebia Sabine Williams, b. March 3, 1845. 

743. ii. Grace Williams, b. Feb. 6, 1849. 

744. iii. Claeie Williams. 1>. Sept. 20. 1851. 

745. iv. Uleyette Williams. Ii. Jan. 27, 1855. 

746. v. Alice Ciiild Williams, b May 04. 185S. 

[Sixth Generation ] 

648. iv. Ursula Child, fourth child and second dau. of 
Stephen and Mercy Chase, b. in Cornish, N. IT., June 2, 1785, 
m. Nov. 2, 1806, Ebenezer Cummings, at Cornish, N. H. He 
was b. June 24, 1779. She d. Jan. 29, 1834. in Cornish. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child : 

747. i. Dudley Cummings. resides at Palmyra, Mo. 

Sixth Generation.] 

650. vi. Eudocia Child, sixth child and fourth dau. of 
Stephen and Mercy Chase Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Jan. 27, 
1789. m. June 8, 1806, Benjamin Freeman, who was born Aug. 
6. 1781, at Plainfield. N. H. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

748. i. Philander Chase Freeman, b. in Plainfield, N. H.. Aug., 1807, 
m. May, 1838. Sarah Norton. 

749. ii. James Freeman, b. in Plainfield, N. H., Aug., 1812, d. May. 
1877. 

750. iii. Mercy Freeman, b. in Plainfield, X. H., Oct., 1814, m. 1837, 
March Chase. 

751. iv. Lucia Freeman, b. in Plainfield, X. H., Nov.. 1817, m. 1843, 
Benj. C. Daniels. 

752. v. Clara Freeman, b. in Plainfield, X. H.. Dec, 1820. Lives in 
Plainfield, X. H. 

753. vi. John Freeman, b. in Plainfield, X. H., April, 1825. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

748. i. Philander Chase Freeman, eldest child of Eudo- 
cia Child and Benjamin Freeman, b. in Plainfield, N. H., Aug., 
1807. m. May, 1838, Sarah Norton of Plainfield, N. H. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

754. i. Frederick Freeman, b. in Claremont, X. H., March, 1839, d. in 
Xewburgh, X. Y., 1867. 

755. ii. Frank Grannis Freeman, b. in Claremont, X. H., April, 1844, 
d. Xov. 1844. 



162 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

750. iii. Mercy Freeman, third child and eldest dau. of 
Eudocia Child and Benjamin Freeman, b. in Plainfield, N. H., 
Oct., 1814, m. Jan., 1837, March Chase of Langdon, N. H. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

756. i. John Chase, b. in Langdon, N. H., Oct., 1840, m. April, 1864, 
Eleanor G. Spaulding in Lebanon, N. H. They had one child. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

757. i. Lucy Chase, b. in Langdon, N. H., March, 1867. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

751. iv. Lucia Freeman, fourth child and second dau. of 
Eudocia Child and Benjamin Freeman, b. Nov., 1817, m. June, 
1843, Benjamin C. Daniels. She died June, 1847. 

[Eighth Generation ] Children : 

758. i. Nellis K. Daniels, b. March, 1844, m. Oct., 1874, Emma J. Hall. 

759. ii. James Morris Daniels, b. Aug., 1846, d. Jan., 1862. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

758. i. Nellis K. Daniels, eldest child of Lucia Freeman 
and Benjamin C. Daniels, and grandson of Eudocia Child Free- 
man, b. March, 1844, m. Oct., 1874, Emma J. Hall in Leban- 
on, N. H. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

760. i. Blanche L. Daniels, b. Aug., 1879. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

652. viii. Stephen Child, Jr., eighth child and third son of 
Stephen and Mercy Chase Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Aug., 
20, 1792, m. March 20, 1822, Eliza Atwood, at Cornish Flats, 
N. H. She was born April 21, 1801, at Pelham, N. H. Mr. 
Child lived and died in Cornish. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

761. i. Eliza Jane Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., June 23, 1823, m. May 
4, 1868, Freeman Woodward of Greenfield, Mass. 

762. ii. Philander Chase Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Sept. 30, 1824, 
m. Sept. 20, 1846, Sarah Hodge of Cornish. 

763. iii. George Franklin Child, b. in Cornish, N. H , July 18, 1827, 
d. Aug. 22, 1834. 

764. iv. William Henry Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Dec. 22, 1832, m. 
Jan. 1, 1857, Ellen Frances Leighton. 

765. v. Marion Ella Child, b. in Cornish, N". H., Oct. 6, 1834, m. July 
10, 1867, Gen. Joseph Hartlinger of Hungary, Europe, now of Dover, N. H. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

764. iv. William Henry Child, fourth child and third son 
of Stephen and Eliza Atwood Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., Dec. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 163 

22, 1832, m. Jan. 1, 1837, Ellen Frances Leighton of Hartford, 
Vt. A farmer, lives at Cornish Flat, N. H. 
[Eighth Generation. J Children: 

766. i. William Palmer Child, 1). Nov. 15, 1857, in Cornish. N. It. 

767. ii. Frank Eugene Child, b. April 19, 1859, in Cornish, N. EL, d. 
1860. 

768. iii. Hattie Lillian Child, b. Dec. 28, 1863, in Cornish, N. H. 

769. iv. Edwin Leighton Child, b. May 28, 1867, in Cornish, N. H. 
770 v. Eva Child. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

054. x. Jane Child, tenth child and seventh dan. of Stephen 
and Mercy Chase Child, b. in Cornish, N. H., m. Jacob J. Saf- 
ford. They lived at Eoyalton, Vermont, a few years and then 
moved to Cold water, Mich., and resided there till the time of 
their death. Their children were all born in Eoyalton, Vt. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

771. i. Henry Safford, was a clergyman of the Episcopal church; has 
been settled in Vermont, Michigan and Indiana. 

772. ii. Heber Chase Safford. 

773. iii. Philander Safford. 

774. iv. Prudextia Safford. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

642. iv. Abel Child, fourth child and fourth son of Daniel 
and Euth Ammidown Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Oct, 18, 1752, 
m. March 11, 1779, Eebecca Allard. She was b. 1760, d. 1820, 
in Woodstock. He d. Nov. 12, 1807, in Woodstock, Ct, where 
he had always lived. They had eight children. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

775. i. Uriah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 5, 1779, m. April 2, 
1807. Polly Carpenter. 

776. ii. Salome Child, b July 8, 1781, m Sept. 3, 1803, Abiel Chamber- 
lain. 

777. iii. Stephen Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 21, 1783, m. Abigail 
Carter. 

778. iv. Nabby Bridges Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 28, 1785, 
unmarried. 

779. v. Eebecca Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, May 6, 1790, m. Jan. 28, 
1822, Nathan Morse. 

780. vi. Abel Child, Jr , b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 6, 1792, m. 1st, 
March 16, 1826, Dorothea Child, m. 2d, Feb. 16, 1831, Sophia Child. 

781. vii. Alvin Child, b. in Woodstock Ct., April 23, 1795, m May 3, 
1824, Mary May. 

782. viii. Daniel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,. Dec. 2, 1797, in. April 9, 
1827, Lucy Carpenter. 



Ifi4 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



[Sixth Generation.] 

775. i. Uriah Child, first child of Abel and Rebecca Allard 
Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 5, 1779, m. April 2, 1807, Polly 
Carpenter. Soon after his marriage he removed to Norwich, 
Chenango county, N. Y., and settled on a farm a few miles from 
the village of Norwich. He died July 4, 1812, leaving a wife and 
three young children. For several years, previous to his mar 
riage, he was a school teacher; with some military aspirations, 
he held a captain's commission in a company of Infantry, which 
he supported with credit to his skill as an officer. At his death, 
Mrs. Child was left to cultivate the farm and care for the chil- 
dren. Being a woman of great energy, and possessing a vigorous 
constitution, under many discouragements, succeeded, in man- 
aging successfully the farm till her sons grew to manhood, and 
relieved her of much of her burdens. She died in Norwich, 
1834. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

783 i. Abel Child, b. in Norwich, Chen, county, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1807. 
He never married. He held the office of captain in a company of Infantry. 
He died Sept. 24, 1864. 

784. ii. Ann Celta Child, b. in Norwich, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1809, m. March 
10, 1840. Samuel Aldrich. He died Jan. 25, 1873, leaving no children. 
Mrs. Aldrich lives in the village of Norwich, N. Y. 

785. iii. Joseph Uriah Child, b in Norwich, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1812, m- 
1st, Dec 5, 1850, Luanna Page. She died Jan. 30, 1858, and he m. 2d, Olive 
Eccleston, whose maiden name was Benedict. He died May 6, 1879. Mr. 
Child was a farmer, and resided in Preston, N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children of Joseph Uriah Child, by his first wife: 

786. i. Celia L. Child, b. April 15, 1855. 

787. ii. John P. Child, b. Jan. 25, 1858. 

[Sixth Generation. 

776. ii. Salome Child, second child of Abel and Rebecca 
Allard Child, b. in Woodstock, July 8, 1781, m. Sept. 3, 1803, 
Abiel Chamberlain. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child : 

788. i. John Newton Chamberlain, b. May 26, 1812, m. 1838, Persis 
Plympton. Had seven children. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

789. i. Rebecca Plympton Chamberlain, b. Nov. 12, 1839, m 1859, T. 
H. Baker. Had five children. 

790. ii. John Newton Chamberlain, b. Feb. 20, 1841, m. Abbie Buck. 

791. iii. Alvin Bond Chamberlain, b. Dec. 16, 1842, m. Oct. 10, 1867, 
Mary L. Frink. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. L65 

792. iv. Ellen S. Chamberlain, b. Jan. 13, 1840, m. Nov. 30, 18G7. 
Emery Andrews. Have two children. 

793. v. Emily L. Chamberlain, b. May 3, 1847, m. 1868, Warren How- 
ard. Have one child. 

794. vi. Mary D. Chamberlain, b. April 24, 1849. 

795. vii. Edwin H. Chamberlain, b. Feb. 2, 1852, in. 187G, Clara C. 
Wallace. Have one child. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

777. iii. Stephen Child, second son, and third child of Abel 
and Rebecca Allard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 21, 
1783, m. Abgail Carter, of Dudley, Mass., who was b. March 
22, 1783. She lives in Woodstock, Ct, in the home to which 
she was taken at her marriage, which must have been in 181 1. 
or 1812, her age being 96 years. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

796. i. Elizabeth M. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., in 1813, m. April 4, 
1843. Rev. L. Burleigh. 

797. ii. Caroline Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., in 1816, m. William 
Chandler. 

798. iii. Abbey Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1818, m. Ashley Mills. 

799. iv. Abel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1821, in. Ellen Bngbee. 

800. v. Harriet F. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1827, m. Harris May. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

790. i. Elizabeth Morse Child, eldest child of Stephen 
and Abigail Carter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1813, m. by 
Rev. Thomas Boutwell, April 4, 1848, to Rev Lucien Burleigh. 

This Burleigh family, into which Elizabeth Morse Child 
married, is one of such prominence, from their unusual ability 
and devotion to the great reforms of the day, we are glad 
their alliance to the Child name permits us to sketch them, 
briefly though it must be. Their lives are of such as we gladly 
offer the youth of our kindred for ensamples. Rev. Lucien 
Burleigh is the son of Rinaldo and Lvdia Bradford Burleigh. 
Mrs. Lydia B. Burleigh was a direct descendant of Governor 
Bradford, who came to the new world with the first band of 
emigrants in 1620, on board the May-flower. Of the family of 
nine children given Mr. and Mrs. Rinaldo Burleigh, two died 
in infanc} T , the other seven attained mature years, six sons and 
one daughter. The physical development of these sons was 
so remarkable, they were sometimes termed "The thirty-six feet 
of Burleigh boys." The eldest son, John Oscar Burleigh, was 
born in Plainfield, Ct., where his father, who was a graduate of 



166 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Yale College, was residing, being the principal of the Plainfield 
Academy. Mr. John O. Burleigh was educated at the Plain- 
field Academy, and at the Connecticut Literary Institute at 
Suffield. He became a teacher in the public schools of Kill- 
ingly, Ct, Oxford and Brookline, Mass. While principal of 
the high school at Oxford Plains, he married Miss Evaline 
Moore, of that place. He had four children. The second child 
of Rinaldo and L. B. Burleigh, was a daughter, Frances 
Mary Bradford Burleigh, who married Jesse Arms, and resided 
in Vineland, New Jersey. The third child was Charles Calis- 
ter Burleigh. "He was a bright scholar at an early age ; was 
fitted for college before he was twelve ; commenced teaching 
when he was fourteen. He was admitted to the bar as a law- 
yer, in Windham county, Ct." At this time he gave promise 
of great brilliancy and distinction in this profession. For two 
years before his admission to the bar, in the years 1833 and '34, 
he edited the first anti-slavery paper in Connecticut. From a 
deep sense of dut}^, he gave up his legal aspirations, and devot- 
ed himself to the cause of the slave, which he plead with un- 
equaled logic, and great eloquence, until the hour of emanci- 
pation. He then became a preacher and ministered to an "In- 
dependent Congregational Society" in Florence, Mass., a posi-" 
tion he held for most of the remaining years of his life. He 
was injured by a passing train when at a railway station, result- 
ing in his death ten days later. The highest testimony to his 
intellectual and moral worth, was rendered by his friends, Sam- 
uel Ma} r , William Lloyd Garrison, and other able men at 
the time of his decease. The fourth child in the family, was 
William Henry Burleigh ; as a boy, possessed of a sunny, 
mirthful temper, which dubbed him the " rogue " in boyhood, 
and cheered and sweetened his manhood. With less academi- 
cal training than his brothers, he made for himself, neverthe- 
less, a place in the ranks of reformers. He became a printer 
and editor, and bravely and effectively labored in the temper- 
ance and anti-slaveiy causes. In 1S37, he removed to Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and published there the Christian Witness, and later 
the Temperance Banner. The years of his residence in Penn- 
sylvania, were busy, useful, honorable and honored. In 1S43, 
he returned to Connecticut, and in Hartford edited the Christ- 
ian Freeman, soon changed to Charter Oak. One who knew 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 167 

him well, and was capable of judging wisely, says of him : "He 
had few equals, and no superiors, as a writer, speaker, editor, 
poet, reformer, friend, associate ; it was the universal testimony 
of those knowing him best, and esteeming him most truly, thai 
he stood in the forefront of his generation." 1 

In 1849, Mr. W. II. Burleigh went to Syracuse, N. Y., in 
the employ of the New York State Temperance Socict}^, as 
lecturer, secretary, and editor of their paper, which position 
he held five years. In 1S55, he received the unsolicited ap- 
pointment of harbor master from Gov. Myron H. Clark. In 
1863, heavy afflictions came upon him, and the loss of father, 
wife, daughter and grandson in rapid succession, so told upon 
his health, he was speedily compelled to seek restoration in 
change of scene. Somewhat more than a year after, he was 
invited to attend a silver wedding in Syracuse ; unable to be 
present, he sent the accompanying little poem of regrets: 

"On this auspicious day, could all niy wishes 

That peace be yours, and happiness, and health, — 
Assume the varied form of silver dishes, 
How would your tables glitter with their wealth. 

But since no sprite can work this transformation, 

I send my simple blessing in this rhyme: 
With hearty love, and honest admiration 

That still grows stronger with the passing time. 

May the good angels evermore attend you 

And make your days all beautiful and fair, 
And since no other silver can I send you, 

I send a lock of my own silver hair." 

He passed away on the 18th March, 1871 ; John Chadwick 
said of him, at his funeral, " He loved everything, from rocks, 
woods, and waters, up to truth and God." 

The fifth child of Rinaldo and Lydia B. Burleigh was Lu- 
cian, who married Elizabeth (or "Betsey") Morse Child ; he 
was born in Plainfield, Ct., on the 3d February, 1817, and is 
yet living in the house where he was born. He studied for the 
ministry, and became a Baptist clergyman ; he was, however, 
early inspired with the reformatory bias of his family. At six- 
teen years of age made his maiden speech, upon temperance, 
and years of his life have found him devoting time and talent 

1 Hon. Francis Gillette, M. C. 



168 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS., 

to the promotion of this reform. In 1 850, he became secretary 
of the "Society for the Suppression of Gambling." In 1854, 
he was again in his native place, engaged in teaching, much of 
the time, in the Plainfield Academy, of which institution he 
has published an extended history. For a number of years he 
has resided upon the ancestral farm, cultivating the soil, and 
acting as agent for the Conn. Temperance Union, also preach- 
ing when called upon. 1 

The fifth son of this line was Cyrus Moses Burleigh, born in 
Plainfield, Ct., 8th Feb., 1S20, dying at Sunnyside, Pa., 7th 
March, 1855. "Though ending life in the richness and 
strength of his mental manhood, the years he had lived were 
full of earnest, hearty toil for the amelioration of the colored 
race, for the release of the intemperate from the thraldom of 
vice, and for the advance of all efforts to uplift his fellow-be- 
ings." The last years of his life were spent in the State of 
Pennsylvania, editing the Pennsylvania Freeman. 

The youngest of these sons was George Shepard Burleigh, 
who was born in Plainfield, in 1822 ; he is now in the full ma- 
turity of a noble physical and mental manhood, and is widely 
known as a poet of much strength and beauty of thought. 
Several years since he published in Philadelphia, Pa., a volume 
of poems, entitled, "The Maniac, and other Poems." At the 
time of the Fremont campaign he published a volume of po- 
ems, on incidents in the life of J. C. Fremont, called, " Signal 
Fires on the Trail of the Path-Finder." He has written manv 
articles for periodicals, which would fill several volumes if col- 
lected. He married Miss Ruth Burgess of Little Compton, 
R. L, where he now resides. 

Of the succeeding generation we say but a few words. There 
seems a remarkable development of artistic taste and talent, from 
which we may hope such good work, in the promotion of 
aesthetic culture, as the parents have wrought in reform. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

801. i. Gertrude Elizabeth Burleigh, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 
10, 1844. 

802. ii. Harriet Frances Bukleigh, b. in Plainfield, Ct., July 10, 1846. 

803. iii. Caroline Ella Burleigh, b. in Plainfield, Ct., July 28, 1848, 
m. Frank Tyler. She resides in Danielsonville, Ct. 

1 To him we are indebted for the main facts given of this band of brothers. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. L69 



v 



804. iv. Lucien Rinaldo Blrleigh, b. in Plainfield, Ct., Feb 6, 1853. 

805. v. Wat. Bradford Burleigh, b. in Plainfield, Ct , July 18, 1855. 
800. vi. John Carter Burleigh, b. in Plainfield, Ct.. .May 18, 1857. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

797. ii. Caroline Child, second dun. and child of Stephen 
and Abigail Carter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1816, m. Jan. 

1. 1S44. William Chandler, son of ('apt. John and Deborah 
Eddy Chandler of Dudley, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. William Chan- 
dler were married by Rev. Thomas Boutwell. 

William Chandler is one of a family of ten children— nine 
sons and one daughter. His eldest brother, John Chandler, 
went as a missionary to India, in Get., 1846, and has continued 
there till the present time. He has had nine children, two of 
whom have died ; the others have received an education in this 
country; three married and returned to India— two as mission- 
aries. Joseph Chandler, another brother of William, is a cler- 
gyman settled in Minnesota, and has had six children, three of 
whom are living. Augustus Chandler, the youngest brother 
of William, is a clergyman, preaching in Brattleboro, Vt., till 
compelled by failing health to relinquish his charge, and is now 
editor of a paper in Vermont. 1 Of the two remaining brothers 
of William Chandler now living, one, Daman, is a farmer in 
Woodstock'. Ct.; the other, Amasa, is the proprietor of a hotel 
on Woodstock Hill, Ct. He has four children : the two eldest 
arc graduates from Yale College, New Haven, Ct. The sister 
of Mr. William Chandler married Royal Hatch of Stratford, 
Vermont, and has had nine children. The farm owned at the 
present time by Mr. William Chandler, has for several genera- 
tions past been in the Child name. Mrs. Stephen Child came 
to this place on her marriage, and is still living, at the age of 
ninety-six. At the annual gathering at this ancient home on 
Thanksgiving days, four generations have been represented for 
several years past. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

807. i. J. F. Chandler, b in Woodstock, Ct., June 27, ls-ir>. 

808. ii. Hattie E. Chandler, Ii. in Woodstock, Ct., April 22, 1849, in. 
Sept. 14, 1870, Chauncey Morse. 

809. iii. Abbie C. Chandler, b. in Woodstock, Vt., Feb. 14, 1852, in. 
May 15, 1873, Monroe Ide. 

1 Rev. Mr. A. Chandler has deceased since the writing of the above. 
M 



170 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

810. iv. Alice C. Chandler, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 31, 1855. 

811. v. Wm. H. Chandler, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 18, 1857. ' 

812. vi. Aones E. Chandler, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 6, 1859. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

808. ii. Hattie E. Chandler, dau. of Caroline Child and 
William Chandler, b. April 22, 1849, m. Sept. 14, 1870, Chaun- 
cey Morse. Reside in Millbury, Mass. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

813. i. Clara Estella Morse, b Dec. 21, 1871. 

814. ii. Ernest Chandler Morse, b. Aug. 16, 1875. 

815. hi. Alice Morse, b. Sept. 23, 1877. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

809. iii. Abbie C. Chandler, dau. of Caroline Child and 
Wm. Chandler, b. Feb. 14, 1852, m. May 15, 1873, Monroe 
Ide. She died April 26, 1877. Resided in Woodstock, Ct. 
[Ninth Generation ] Child: 

816. i. Herbert Chauncy Ide, b. Oct. 21, 1874. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

798. iii. Abbey Child (Abigail Eleanor), dau. of Stephen 
and Abigail Carter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Aug. 11, 1818, 
m. April 6, 1842, Ashley Mills, son of Nathaniel and Polly 
Tourtelotte Mills of Thompson, Ct. Married by Rev. Thomas 
Boutwell. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

817. i. Abigail Eleanor Mills, b. in Thompson, Ct., Feb. 15, 1843, d. 
Aug. 22, 1848. 

818. ii. Nathaniel Child Mills, b. in Thompson, Ct., April 21, 1845, 
d. in Boston, Oct. 13, 1872. 

819. iii. Ashley P. Mills, b. in Thompson, Ct., Sept. 25, 1847. 

820. iv. Stephen Child Mills, b. in Thompson, Ct., Aug. 29, 1850, d. 
Sept. 29, 1850. 

821. v. Charles Eugene Mills, b. in Thompson, Ct., Jan. 12, 1852. 

822. vi. Wm. Carter Mills, b. in Thompson, Ct., Nov., 1854. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

799. iv. Dea. Abel Child, son of Stephen and Abigail Car- 
ter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, July 27, 1821, in. April 2, 1851, 
Ellen Matilda Bugbee, dau. of Hezekiah and Jemima Harding 
Busrbee. She was b. Nov. 27, 1831. Reside in So. Wood- 
stock, Ct. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 171 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

823. i. Clarence Harding Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 14, ls.T). 

824. ii. Charles Carter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 30, 1861. 
d. Sept. 12, 1866. 

825. iii. Ellen Maria Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 16, 1866. 

826. iv. Herbert Chauncy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 18, 1868, 
d. March 12, 1872. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

800. v. Harriet F. Child, fourth dau. and fifth child of 

Stephen and Abigail Carter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 

7, 1820. m. March 13, 1856, Charles Harris May. son of Asa 

and Sally May : lie was b. Sept. 2, 1823. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
837. i. Jllia A. May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 25, 1857. 

828. ii. Charles H. May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 1, 1858. 

829. iii. Herbert May, b. in. Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 27, 1860. 

830. iv. Asa L. May, b. in Woodstock, Ct , Jan. 6. 1864. 

831. y. Marion F. May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 18. 1866. 
832 vi. John S. May, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Feb. 25, 1868. 

833. vii. Eyerett May, b. in Woodstock, Ct , April 22, 1870. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

779. v. Rebecca Child, fifth child of Abel and Rebecca 
Allard Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., 1790, m. Jan. 28, 1822, 
Nathan Morse of Woodstock, Ct; he was b. 1785, d. 1853. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

834. i. George Morse, b, in Wookstock. Ct , March 29, 1825, m. April 
5, 1852, Syh'ia Child May, dau. of Trenck and Cynthia Child May of North 
Woodstock, Ct. They haYe no children. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

780. vi. Abel Child, Jr., third son and sixth child of Abel 
and Rebecca Allard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, July 1, 1792. 
m. 1st, March 16, 1826, Dorothea Child, dan. of Capt. Elias 
and Sophia Morse Child. She d. July 4, 1829. He m. 2d, Feb. 
16, 1831, Sophia Child, sister of his first wife. He d. in Wood- 
stock, Ct, Ma}" 4, 1878, a?t. 86. His widow resides in Boston, 
with one of her sons. 

[Seventh Generation,] Children: 

(By his first wife, Dorothea,) 

835. i. Edward Child, b. Dec. 17, 1826, in Woodstock. Ct., m. April 6, 
1851, Maria Child. 

836. ii. Frederick Newman Child, b. March 19, 1829, in Woodstock, 
Ct. Was killed in battle at Spottsyl\-ania,Ya., in the War of the Rebellion, 
May 10. 1864. 



172 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 

(By his second wife, Sophia, he had:) 

837. iii. Spencer Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 19, 1832, in. April, 
1861, Eliza Goodrich. 

838. iv. Ellen Dorothea Child, 1). in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 5, 1833, 
m. April 29, 1858. Henry May. 

839. v. Andrew Jackson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Jan. 19, 1838, m. 
April 21, Anne E. Brown. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

835. i. Edward Child, son of Abel and Dorothea Child, b. 
Dec. 17, 1826, m. April 16, 1851, Maria Child, dau. of Lemuel 
Child, who was the son of Moses Child. He d. April 10, 1862. 
Mrs. Child resides in North Woodstock, Ct. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

840. i. Eugene Child, b. May 18, 1853. 

841. ii. Edward Child, b. Jan. 28, 1862, d. April 10, 1862. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

837. iii. Spencer Child, son of Abel and Sophia Child, b. 
May 19, 1832, m. April 3, 1861, Eliza Goodrich, dau. of Sam i 
A. and Elizabeth Wheeler Goodrich. She was b. July 2, 1838. 
Beside at 226 Broadway, Cambridgeport, Mass. Business 172 

State street, Boston. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

842. i. Louise E. Child, b. March 14, 1862. 

843. ii. Ernest G. Child, b. July 6, 1868. 

844. iii. Howard Child, b. Nov. 4, 1871, d. Jan. 3, 1872. 
S45. iv. Wallace Spencer Child, b. 1872, d. Dec. 13, 1874. 

846. v. Alice May Child, b. 1874, d. Nov. 10, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

S3S. iv. Ellen Dorothea Child, only dau. of Abel and 
Sophia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Dec. 5, 1S33, m. April 29, 
1858, Henry May, son of Trenck and Cynthia Child May of 
North Woodstock. Mr. May was appointed, under President 
Lincoln's administration, as commercial agent at Gaboon, Africa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

847. i. Florence E. May, b. June 14, 1861. 

848. ii. George H. May, b. April 3, 1867. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

781. vii. Alvin Child, fourth son and seventh child of 
Abel and Eebecca Allard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 
23, 1795, m. May 3. 1824, Mary May, dau. of Ephraim May. 
Met his death by accidental burning. 
[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

849. i. Alvin Child, b. 1825. 




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ANDMIIS DESCENDANTS. 173 

[Sixth Generation.] 

782. viii. Daniel Child, sou, eighth child of Abe] and 
Rebecca Allard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 8, 1797, m. 
April 9, 1827, Lucy Carpenter, dan. of Cyril Carpenter. She 
was b. May 12, 1802, .1. July, 1803. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

850. i. Cyril Carpenter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 20, 1828, 
lives in Boston. 

851. ii. Oscar Herbert Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 8, 1831, m. 
Dec. 25, 1857, Mary L. Appleton. 

852. iii. Foster Daniel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 13, 1834, in. 
Eliza A. Ormsby. 

853. iv. Susan Richmond Child, Ii. in Woodstock, Ct.. March 11,1836. 
Has spent many years in teaching. In the winter of 1869-70, she taught in 
Savannah, Ga. Also, in Wilmington, N. C. After teaching two seasons in 
the South, she taught one year in Illinois; thence returned to her home in 
W., and m. May 30, 1877, Joseph W. Cliff of Marshfield, Mass. 

854. v. Freeman W. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct , Dec. 15, 1839, j 

d. at Ottawa, Ills., 1867. !- Twins. 

855. vi. AmasA C. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 15, 1839, j 

m. Jan. 13, 1869, Anna L. Emery, d. May 9,1874,in San Francisco, Cal. 

856. vii. Henry S. Child, b in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 19, 1844, lives in 
North Woodstock, with his brother, Foster Child. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

851. ii. Oscar Herbert Child, second son of Daniel and 
Lucy Carpenter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, March 8, 1831, m. 
Dec. 25, 1857, Mary L. Appleton. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

857. i. Arthur Appleton Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dee. 18, 1859. 

858. ii. Mary E. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 13, 1865. 

859. iii. John Appleton Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct , June 28, 1866. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

30. iv. Henry Child, fourth child of Ephraimand Priscilla 
Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 28, 1717, m. twice : 
1st, in 1742, to Rebecca Bacon, who was b. Oct. 9, 1722, and 
d. Nov. 17, 1753, set. 31 ; 2nd, July 6, 1757, to Dorothy Child, 
dau. of Nathaniel Child, of Thompson, Ct.; she was b. Sept. 18, 
1730, and d. April 17, 1794. He d. Jan. 17, 1795, ;et. 78 yrs. 

Henry Child was one of the ten of the name of Child, who 
took the Freeman's Oath on the transfer of the town of Wood- 
stock, from the colony of Massachusetts to the colony of Con- 
necticut. Very little written record has been left of his life. 
From tradition, he was esteemed as a man of much character 



174 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS. 

and influence in Woodstock. The character of his descendants, 
of whom more is known, will certainly justify the opinion, that 
physically and intellectually, he ranked among the best class 
of citizens of that town. Immediately on his marriage, he went 
with his brother, Peter, from Muddy Brook, now East Wood- 
stock, to the Northwest part of the town, known afterwards as 
the " English neighbourhood." This part of the town was then 
mostly forest, and had been the hunting ground of the Indians, 
and the habitation of bears and other wild beasts ; and still con- 
tinued to be frequented by the Indians. This gave rise to many 
fears of the mother of these youthful pioneers, lest they should 
be eaten by bears or murdered by Indians. Henry and Peter 
located lots adjoining. Henry, after spending some years in a 
small cabin, erected in the year 1760, a commodious house 
which still stands in good condition upon the original site, own- 
ed and occupied by one of his descendants. This house Mr. 
Child kept many years as an Inn. Around this early home clus- 
ter interesting memories. It stood on the great thoroughfare 
from the Western settlements of the colony to the seaboard, and 
afforded shelter and rest to many a weary traveller. Often it 
became the resting place of the patriot soldier in his marches to 
and from the battlefield during the Revolutionary struggle, 
when the hospitalities of the patriotic landlord were unstinted- 
ly dealt out. Often the floors of the parlor, kitchen and barroom 
were covered for the night with sturdy soldiers. Sometimes it 
was used as a hall of justice. On one occasion an exciting 
trial of one Bugbee, who had headed a town riot, took place 
there. He resisted the legal authorities in collecting the town 
taxes. The trial ended in his conviction and punishment. 

Of late years the quiet hospitalities of successive heads of 
families of the line have been cheerfully dispensed, and the fre- 
quent gatherings of descendants, to the fifth generation from the 
patriarch Henry, have kept alive the memories of the past. 
One, as memorable among them, was the gathering in honor of 
Capt. Willard Child, a son of Henry and successor to the home- 
stead, which occurred in 1842, when the venerable father, 
then in his eighty third year, sat as priest amidst children, 
grandchildren and great grandchildren to the number of 130, 
pronouncing the coveted benediction upon the waiting and hap- 
py throng. The closing scene was one of song and thanks- 



A N I ) dl IS DESCENDANTS. 1 75 

giving; recognizing the beneficent Providence which had ever 
vouchsafed His guardianship to this numerous household. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

860. i. Infant, not named, b. 1742. d. young. 

801. ii. Amasa Child, b. in W Lstock, Ct., June 13, 1745, m. Feb. 1, 

1770, Joanna Carpenter. 

862. Hi. Levi Child, l>. in Woodstock, Ct., -Tan. 10, 1747. Was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary war, and died in the army at New Castle, N. Y., Nov. 
15, 1776. 

863. iv. Cynthia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 19, 1749, m. Jan. 11, 
1770, Amasa Carpenter: 

864. v. Dinah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 21, 1751, d. unmarried. 

865. vi. Willard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 7, 1758, m. 1st, Jan. 
10, 1781, Lydia Morse, m. 2nd, May 7, 1795, Sylvia Child. 

866. vii. Ephraim Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 7, 1760, m. June 12. 
1792, Betsey Bacon, died without issue. His widow married Minerva, Cush- 
man, of Exeter, Otsego county, N.Y. 

867. viii. Joanna Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 20, 1762, \ 

died Nov. 27, 1762. ( . 

868. ix. Rebecca Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 26, 1762, j Twms - 

m. Nov. 27, 1794, Luther Baldwin. J 

[Fifth Generation.] 

861. ii. Amasa Child, eldest son and second child of Henry 
and Rebecca Bacon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 13, 1745> 
in. Feb. 1, 1770, Joanna Carpenter. He d. Sept. 8, 1820. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

869. i. Royal Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1770, bap. Oct. 17, 1772, d. 
1775. 

870. ii. Dorothy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 4, 1772, bapt. May 
26, 1776, d. unmarried. 

871. iii. Aaron Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 19, 1794, m. 1st, Lucy 
Burn ham : m. 2nd. Mary Spring. 

872. iv. Sally Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, June 9, 1796, in. William 
Duncan, and resided in New York City. 

873. v. Levi Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 8, 1778, d. young. 

874. vi. Levi Child, 2d, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 13, 1779. 

875. vii. Polly Child, b. in Woodstock Ct., Aug. 19, 1781, d. unm. 
870. viii. Betty Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 4, 1783, d. Feb. 1795. 

877. ix. Irene Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 4, i785. 

878. x. Persis Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 25, 1787. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

871. iii. Capt. Aaron Child, third child and eldest son of 

Amasa and Joanna Carpenter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 

19, 1794. m. 1st, about 1804, to Lucy Burnham, dau. of 

Capt. Jotham Burnham, of Ashford, Ct. By her he had one 

c hild. Mrs. Child died soon after the birth of this child. He 



176 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

m. 2nd, about 1S14, Mary Spring of Petersham, Mass. She d. 
in Woodstock, June 1, 1857. He d. in Woodstock, Ct. April 
18, 1851. He held a captain's commission in a company of In- 
fantry for many years. Like many others who are not born 
with a silver spoon in their mouth, he struggled hard through life 
to obtain it, without success. He possessed a kindly nature, 
full of good humor, and given to hospitality ; so that his social 
life brought and conferred compensating pleasures. As a neigh- 
bor, none were more ready to confer friendly offices, and even to 
make sacrifices for the benefit of others. As an instance of 
pleasant humor, on one occasion his neighbor employed him to 
do a piece of work. When the job was finished, he received as 
compensation only the employers' thanks. Taking it all in 
good part, he spoke of it humorously, and frequently to his 
neighbors as a generous compensation, and. as the first instance 
of prompt pay for his services since he had resided in the town. 
He was a whig in politics, patriotic in his feelings and a warm 
advocate for the emancipation of the enslaved colored race. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

879. i. Hiram Burnham Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 5, 1805, m. 
Oct. 8, 1828, Fannie Nye. 

[By his second marriage :] 

880. ii. Lucy Burnham Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 21, 1815, m. 
1st, 1834, Ralph Russell; m. 2nd, 1844, Charles T. Wortley. 

881. iii. George Washington Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 19, 
1818, d. Feb. 9, 1843. 

882. iv. Levi Lincoln Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 16. 1820, m. 
Charlotte Sheldon, of Somers, Ct. They reside in New London, Ct. 

883. v. Caroline Amanda Child, b. March 31, 1823. ni. George Baylies, 
of Southbridge, Mass. 

884. vi. Amasa Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 16, 1825, in. Feb. 28, 
1851, Sarah L. Child. 

885. vii. Aaron Child, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Oct, 30, 1827, m. Nov. 
14, 1876. Mary Carpenter. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

879. i. Hiram Burnham Child, eldest child of Capt. Aaron 
and Lucy Burnham Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Dec. 5, 1805, 
m. Oct. 8, 1828, Fanny Nye, of Keene, N. H. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children. 

886. i. Charles Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 8, 1829, resides in 
Atco, Camden county, N. J. 

887. ii. Lura Irene Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 1, 1831, m. Dec. 
1, 1852, James Alton, of Atco, Camden county, N. J. 



AND EHS DESCENDANTS. 1 i 7 

888. iii. Lydia Benson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 3, 1833. d. in 
Dudley, Mass., June 27, 1855. 

889. iv. Licv Burnham Child, b. in Woodstock, Any. 12, 1837. unm. 
Resides in Danbiiry, Ct. 

890. v. Louisa Maria Child, b. in W l>t<>ck, Ct.. Sept. G, 1843, m. 

July, 1863, Walter W. Kimball. Resides in New York City. 

891. vi. Sarah Elizabeth Child. 1>. in Webster, Mass., June 18, 1840. 
in. Oct. 2, 1874, Geo. S. Purdy. Resides in Danbury, Ct. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

>s0. ii. Lucy Burnham Child, second child of Capt. Aaron 

Child, by his second wife, Mary Spring, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 

Oct. 21, 1815, m. 1st, 1834, Ralph Russell : m. 2nd, 1811. 

Charles T. Wortley. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children. By Ralph Russell: 

892. i. Mary RrssELL, in. 1859, Ephraim Snyder. 

893. ii. Jane Russell. 

[By Mr. Wortley:] 

894. iii. Herbert C. Wortley. b. Aug. 13. 1810. 

895. iv. Lizzie C. Wortley. b. Oct, 3, 1852. 
890. v. Willie J. Wortley. b. April 18. 1856. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

feST. i. Mary Russell, eldest child of Lucy Burnham Child 
and Ralph Russell, in. Ephraim Snyder about 1859. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

897. i. Alanthia Snyder, b. 1860. 

898. ii. Harris Snyder, b. 1803. 

899. iii. Frederick Snyder, b. 1807. 

900. iv. Ralph Snyder, b. 1809. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

S84. iv. Amasa Child, sixth child and fourth son of Capt. 
Aaron Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Dec. 16. 1825, m. Feb. 28, 
1851, Sarah L. Child, dan. of Charles and Almira Holmes Child. 
Mr. Child is a farmer. He removed from Woodstock, Ct., in 
1839, to Adams county, Iowa, thence to the town of Jefferson, 
Green countv, Iowa, where he now resides. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

901. i. Mary Ella Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct.. June 14, 1852. 

902. ii. Emma Almira Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct., Dee. 9, 1857. 

903. iii. Eva Floretta Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 15. 1857. 

904. iv. Charles Freeman Child, b. in Ea>t Woodstock, Ct.. Feb. 9. 
1863. 

905. v. Leonard Holmes Child, b. in East Woodstock. Ct.. Oct. 9, 
1865. 



178 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBUKY, MASS. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

865. vi. Capt Willard Child, sixth child and third son 
of Henry and Dorothy (Child) Child — she was the daughter 
of Nathaniel and Dorothy Johnson Child — b. in Woodstock, 
Ct, in the northwestern part of the town, known as the "Eng- 
lish neighbourhood, ,, May 7, 1758, m. 1st, Jan. 10, 1781,Lydia 
Morse, dan. of Deacon Jedediah and Sarah Child Morse, and 
the sister of Rev. Dr. Jedediah Morse of Charlestown, Mass. 
The account of the Morse family as allied to the Child family, 
is fully treated in another place. Mrs. Willard Child was b. 
in Woodstock, Ct., June 22, 1759; she d. Dec. 9, 1792. He 
m. 2d, 1795, Sylvia Child, dau. of Capt. Elisha and Alice 
Manning Child of East Woodstock, Ct; she was b. Oct. 28, 
1762, d. 1824. Capt. Willard d. Nov. 1, 1844. 

Capt. Willard Child was descended from a stock, both intel- 
ligent and enterprising. He was also allied by marriage with 
intelligence and moral worth; consequently his surroundings 
were of a healthful and elevating tone. He belonged to a class 
of thoughtful and substantial men who gave character and dig- 
nity to the age in which they lived. Measured by the stand- 
ard of intelligence, morality and practical Christianity of that 
age, which was by no means of an indifferent character, few 
men stood on a higher plane. He was prominent and influential 
in private and public affairs. His opinions were sought in de- 
termining difficult matters in church and state. His wisdom, 
probity and sagacity gave him deserved prominence among his 
fellow townsmen. 

He lived in warlike times. At- an early age his surround- 
ings were such as to awaken patriotic feelings. The spirit of 
independence in governmental affairs in the colonies then prev- 
alent was aroused in his own breast, and in the ardor of robust 
youth he enlisted in the service of his country, and served 
through the Revolutionary War. 

Army life has its amusing incidents, as well as its more seri- 
ous and trying experiences. The following anecdote was many 
years ago related to me hj one of my grandfather's comrades : 
The hour of supper in the camp was approaching. The time 
had come for filling their pitchers with milk for the evening 
repast, from the cows in a field adjoining the camp. The owner 
of the herd kept a close lookout for the army boys. Aware of 



AND HrS DESCENDANTS. 179 

this fact, a roguish comrade fell behind his companions on the 
way, and paused while they filled their pitchers. As thev were 
leaving the field, he stealthily approached within gunshot, and 
with an old root, resembling in the twilight :i. musket, took 
steady aim at young Child, and with the click of his tongue he 
aroused his attention — who seeing, as he supposed, the old 
fanner with his gun sighting for a deadly shot, started on the 
double quick for the camp. In great fright he reached his 
tent with an empty pitcher. Discovering that he had been 
made the victim of a joke, and taking it all in good part, he 
returned and obtained the needed supply of milk, and enjoyed 
a good supper as well as a good joke ! 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

905. i. Nancy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. Doc 3, 1782. m. 1st, 1802, 
Elisha Child, m. 2d. Sept, 20, 1831, Dea. Dudley Child. 

(For record of children, see Elisha Child, No. 13-10.) 

906. ii. Hannah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 2, 1785, m. Jan. 24, 
1804. David Morse, Jr. 

907. iii. Clarissa Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., March 5, 1787, m. Jan. 
21, 1808, Charles Thompson Child. 

(For record of children, see Charles Thompson Child, No. 1342.) 
£08. iv. Henry Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 3, 1789, m. 1st, 1813, 
Lucretia Child; 2d, April 3, 1818, Henrietta May; 3d, Nov. 10, 1823, Lucy 
May: 4th, Betsey Buel. 

909. v. Luther Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct,, Mar. 19, 1791, m. 1st, Jan. 
25, 1815, Pamelia Child, 2d, Miss Susan Walker. 

[By Sylvia Child.] 

910. vi. Willard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 14, 1796, m. Sept. 
13, 1827, Katharine Griswold Kent. 

911. vii. Lydia Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., July 29, 1798, in. Nov. 11, 
1821, Erastus May. 

912. viii. Sylvia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 28, 1800, m. Elisha 
Walker. 

913. ix. Cynthia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 2, 1804, m. Dec. 16, 
1828, Trenck May. 

[Sixth Generation ] 

900. ii. Hannah Child, second child of Capt Willard and 
Lydia Morse Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, April 2, 1785, m. 
Jan. 24, 1804, David Morse, son of Dr. David and Anna New- 
man Morse of Woodstock, Ct, He was b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
Jan. 29, 1777. His father was the son of Dr. Parker Morse, 
A. M., and Hannah Hughes. The father of Dr. Parker Morse 
was Capt Abel Morse, of the fourth generation of the Morses; 
he was a member of the Colonial Legislature one or more terms; 



180 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

was b. Oct. 5, 1792, m. 1st, Grace Parker, 1714, 2d, Mary Kim- 
ball, 1757. His father, Benjamin Morse, of the third genera- 
tion, b. 1668, m. Susanna, dau. of Abel Merrill, and grand- 
daughter of Aquilla Chase of Cornwall, Eng. His father was 
Deacon Benjamin Morse of the second generation, b. March 4, 
1640, and married Euth Sawyer. Benjamin Morse's father 
was Anthony Morse, of the first generation in America, and 
emigrated to America in 1635, and settled in Newbury, Mass. 
Immediately on their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. David Morse 
removed from Woodstock to Exeter, Otsego Co., 1ST. Y., and 
settled on a farm in the southeast part of the town, where 
they lived till 1S22, when they removed to Barrington, Yates 
Co., K Y., where they both died— Mr. Morse Sept. 27, 1828, 
and Mrs. Morse in 1842. Mr. Morse was a man of unusual 
energy of character, sound judgment and executive ability, of 
sterling integrity and of decided Christian principles. He was 
a wise and affectionate father, and a kind husband. He was 
an earnest and consistent member of the Congregational church, 
and when his work was finished, died in the Christian faith, in 
the full belief of a glorious resurrection. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

914. i. Lydia Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y.,Jan. 21, 1805, m. March 1, 
1831, Cameron Goft 

915. ii. Infant, unchristened, b. in Exeter, N.Y., Jan. 21, 1805, d. jg. 

916. iii. Earl Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Sept. 27, 1806, d. 
Nov. 1, 1833. 

917. iv. Roscius Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., April 29, 1808, 
m. in 1837, Mary Ann Hill. 

918. v. Linus Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co.. N. Y., April 20, 1810, m. 
July 18, 1839, Jane McCain. 

919. vi. Henry Child Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., May 22, 1811, m. 1st, 
1843. Sarah May Child, 2d, 1858, Caroline Lincoln (Hammond). 

920. vii. Hannah Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y , Oct. 23, 1813, m. Nov. 7, 
1839, William Egbert Crane. 

921. viii. Nancy Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Dec. 8. 1815, d. unm.. Feb. 
7, 1845. 

922. ix. Mary Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., July 12, 1817, lives at Ridge- 
field, Ills. 

923. x. Emily Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Aug. 13, 1818, d. Oct. 11, 
1851. 

924. xi. Celina Morse, b. in Exeter, N.Y., Mar. 16, 1S20, lives at Ridge- 
field, Ills. 

925. xii. Sherman Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Mar. 12, 1821, in. Nov. 
29, 1872, Sarah 0. Halcom. 

Vt26. xiii. Albert Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., April 19, 1822, farmer 
in Ridgefield, Ills. 



AND JUS DESCENDAN 1 'S. L8] 

927. xiv. Infant, nnchristened, d. young. 

928. xv. Floyd Morse, b. in Barrington, Fates Co., N. Y, Oct. 20, 1825, 
m. Mary Amanda PiercA 

929. xvi. Willaed Child Morse, b. in Barrington, Yates Co., X. Y., Oct. 
20, 182(3. in. April G. 1853, .Mary Erwin Cooper. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

914. i. Lydia Morse, eldest child of Hannah Child and Da- 
vid Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Jan. 2, 1805, m. 
March 1. 1831, Cameron W. GofT* of Howard. Steuben Co., 
N. Y.; removed to Nunda, TIL. where she died Feb., 1878. 

They had live children; two only Lived. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

930. i. Henrietta Goff, b. 1832, in. Columbus Howe. 

931. ii. William Watson Goff, b. in 1837, m. Laura Paine of Nunda, 
Ills. Have four children, names not given. 

[Eighth Generation] 

980. i. Henrietta Goff, eldest child of Lydia Morse and 

Cameron Golf, and grand dau. of Hannah Child Morse, b. 1832, 
m. Columbus Howe, and live in Osage, Iowa. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

932. i. Barxett Howl. 

933. ii. Egbert Howe. 

934. iii. Willard Howe. 

935. iv. Lizzie Howe. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

917. iv. Dr. Roscius Morse, fourth child and second son 
of Hannah Child and David Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y, April 
29. 1808. m. April. 1887. Mary Ann Hill. She d. Dec. 30, 
1870. He d. March 26, 1877, in Elmirn, K Y. 

In his boyhood Dr. Morse enjoyed the advantages of a com- 
mon school education, by which he was fitted for teaching in 
early youth : an occupation which he followed for several sea- 
sons, when he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Carr 
of Canandaigua, X. Y. Completing his medical studies, he 
entered upon the practice in Barrington, Yates Co., 1ST. Y. : 
thence he went to Penn Yan. in the same county, where he 
gained more than a local reputation in his profession. After a 
number of years of successful practice in Penn Yan. he remov- 
en to Elmira, Chemung Co.. X. Y. His success as a physician 
having preceded him, he readily secured an extensive and In 
crative practice, extending over some fifteen years, at the close 
of which he died a happy death, much lamented by his family 
and a numerous circle of friends. A touching incident which 



182 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

occurred in his last hours is wortlry of record. The Doctor 
had become much attached to a horse, which had for many 
years been his faithful servant, carrying him safely over rough 
paths and dangerous places, amid tempests of rain and driving- 
snow-storms. That he might take a farewell look, and bid a 
final adieu to this noble animal, the Doctor directed him to be 
brought from his stall, after he had been neatlj- groomed, and 
to be led by the window of the room where he was lying. As 
the animal passed by and returned, the Doctor waived his white 
handkerchief and said, "good-bye, old friend." Dr. Morse was 
a thorough business man, as well as a successful practitioner, a 
conscientious Christian, an esteemed and useful citizen, a true 
and sincere friend. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

936. i. Barnet W. Morse, in. Henrietta Scott. 

937. ii. Roscius Morse, died early. 

938. iii Roscius C. Morse, in. Louisa Westlake. 

939. iv. Mary Morse, m. Junius R. Clark. 

940. v. Henry Child Morse. 

941. vi. Lucia Benton Morse. 

942. vii. Jennie Morse. 

*** viii. An infant unbaptized. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

93H. i. Dr. Barnet W. Morse, eldest child of Dr. Roscius 
and Mary Hill Morse, m. Henrietta Scott of Southport, Che- 
mung Co.. N. Y. He was educated a physician, and is prac- 
ticing in Elmira, IS". Y. He was a surgeon in the Union army 
in the late civil war. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

943. i. Lucia Benton Morse. 

944. ii. Fannie Morse. 

945. iii. Jessie Morse, d. vg. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

938. iii. Roscius C. Morse, third child and third son of Dr. 
Roscius and Mary Hill Morse, m. Loisa Westlake of Cleveland. 
O. Mr. Morse is a merchant in Elmira, N. Y. They have 
three children : names not given. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

939. iv. Mary Hastings Morse, fourth child and eldest 
dan. of Dr. Roscius and Mary Hill Morse, m. Sept, 25, 1875, 
Junius R. Clark, Esq., a lawyer of Warren, Pa. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 
949. i. Son, b. March 19, 1877. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 183 

[Seventh Generation.] 

918. v. Linus Moese, fifth child and third son of Eannah 
Child and David Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., April 
20. 181<>, m. July 18, 1839, Jane McCain, dan. of Joseph Mr- 
Cain of Barrington, Yates Co.. N. Y. Mr. Morse moved from 
Barrington to Nunda, 111., thence to Nebraska. He served in 
the Union army in the war of the Rebellion. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

950. i. Elizabeth Mouse, m. Martin Kellogg of Ridgefield, 111. Have 
four children. 

951. ii. Alfred Mouse, served in the army of the Union in the late war 
of the Rebellion. At the close of the war he settled in Nebraska, on a sol- 
diers claim: is a conductor on a western railroad. 

952. iii. Webster Morse, m. a Miss Stickncy of Nunda, 111. They re- 
side in Nunda. He is a mail agent from Chicago, 111., to St. Paul, Minn. 

953. iv. Frances Morse, m. Mr. Friend: have several children, names 
and dates of birth not given. 

954. v. Mary Morse, m. Mr. Jenkins, and settled in Nebraska. 

955. vi. Helen Mouse, unmarried. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

919. vi. Eev. Henry Child Morse, six child and fourth 
son of Hannah Child and David Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego 
Co., N. Y., March 22. 1811. 

Mr. Morse was graduated at Yale College, New Haven, Ct., 
in 1S39. During the three following years he was principal of 
Nichols Academy, Dudley, Mass. He studied theology in 
Andover, Mass.. and in Auburn, X. Y.; was licensed to preach 
by Windham County Association, Ct. ; soon after settled over 
a church in Lima, Ind. Afterwards removed to Tyrone, Steu- 
ben Co., N. Y.; thence to Union City, Mich., where he held the 
pastorate of the Congregational Church for five years, when he 
was called to take charge, as principal, of La Grange Institute, 
Ind. During his connection with the Institute, he supplied desti- 
tute churches in the vicinity of La Grange as opportunity offered. 
A year and a half later he returned to Union City, and settled 
on a farm, where he has since resided, beloved by a large circle 
of friends. His Christian activities have not been relaxed. The 
Sabbath schools in Union City and feeble churches in the vi- 
cinity, have largely profited by his labors. The personal qual- 
ities of Mr. Morse have won for him many friends. Open- 
hearted, frank, and benevolent, he readily finds his way to the 
hearts of the people and commands their confidence and respect 



184 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXE-URY, MASS. 

Mr. Morse has been twice married ; first in May, 1843, to Sarah 
May Child, dau. of Deacon Luther and Pamelia Child of Wood- 
stock, Ct. She died in Union City, Mich., 1848, leaving no 
children. His second marriage was in 1858, to Caroline Lin- 
coln (Hammond), widow of Samuel J. Mills Hammond, Esq., 
attorney at law, and son of Judge Chester Hammond, an early 
settler, an influential and much esteemed citizen of Union 
City. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child : 

956. i. Henry Mills Mouse, b. in Union City, Mich., Dee., 1855. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

920. vii. Hannah Morse, seventh child and second dau. of 
Hannah Child and David Morse, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., 
K Y., Oct. 23, 1813, m. Nov. 7, 1839, William Egbert Crane, 
son of Ira Crane of Barrington, Yates Co., N. Y. Soon after 
their marriage they moved to Bradford, Steuben Co., N. Y, 
where they still reside. Mr. Crane has been an extensive and 
successful farmer, and accumulated a handsome property, upon 
which he has retired to spend his declining years in independ- 
ence and ease. They have but one child. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child : 

957. i. Georgiana Crane, b. in Bradford, X. Y., June 30, 1846, m. May 
22, 1867, Cyrus M. Merriman. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

957. i. Georgiana Crane, only child of Hannah Morse and 
William Egbert Crane, b. in Bradford, N. Y., June 30, 1846, m. 
May 22, 1867, Cyrus M. Merriman, son of Hiram Merriman, a 
lumber merchant in Williamsport, Pa. Mr. Cyrus M. Merri- 
man possesses fine business talents, and holds the office of 
justice of the peace in Bradford, N. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

958. i. Egbert Crane Merriman, b. in Bradford, N. Y., May 18, 1868. 

959. ii. Augusta Curtiss Merriman, b. in Bradford, N. Y., June 15, 
1870. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

925. xii. Dr. Sherman Morse, twelfth child and fifth son of 
Hannah Child and David Morse, b. in Exeter, N. Y., March 
12, 1821, m. Nov. 9, 1872, Sarah Orthonett Halcom of Lang- 
don, N. H. He was in the Union army in the late civil war, 



ANIi HIS DESCENDANTS. 185 

as physician and surgeon : afterwan Is settled in Ridgefield, [11., 
where he now resides, following his profession, and farming. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

960. i. Annie H. Mouse. 

961. ii. Fi.oyd S. Mouse. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

928. xv. Dr. Floyd Mouse, fifteenth child and seventh son 
of Hannah Child and David Morse, b. in Barrington, Yates 
Co., N. Y., April 11, 1825, m. Mary Amanda Pierce, dau. of 
Dea. Allanson and Sylvia Pierce of Coopers Plains. Chemung 
Co., N. Y. Dr. Morse entered upon his practice in Tuscarora,. 
Livingston Co., N. Y., afterwards removed to Painted Post, 
Steuben Co., N. Y., where he died, Sept. 20, 1858. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children, 

962. i. Emma Pierce Morse, 1). Oct. 31, 1850, m. Sept. 1, 1875, Rev. 
Giles II. Hubbard, a Baptist Clergyman. 

963. ii. Benjamin Rush Morse, b. Oct. 21, 1852. 

964. iii. Floyd Herbert Morse, b. Aug. 31, 1854. 

965. iv. Annie L. Morse, )>. May 23, 1856. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

929. xvi. Willard Child Morse, youngest child and 
eighth son of Hannah Child and David Morse, b. in Barring- 
ton, Yates Co., N. Y., Oct, 20. 1826, m. April 6, 1853, Mary 
Erwin Cooper, dau. of Dr. John Cooper of Cooper's Plains, 
Steuben Co., N. Y. Mr. Morse is a well-to-do farmer and an 
esteemed citizen of Painted Post, Steuben Co., N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

966. i. John Cooper Morse, b. in Painted Post, Sept. 22, 1854. 

967. ii. Lizzie Evans Morse, b. in Painted Post, Feb. 19, 1857, d. Oct. 
21, 1864, at Coopers Plains. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

908. iv. Henry Child, fourth child and eldest son of Capt. 
Willard and Lydia Morse Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Jan. 3, 
1789, m. Oct. 1. 1813, Lucretia Child, dau. of Nehemiah and 
Eliza Shipman Child. She d. April 3, 1816; he m. 2d, April 
3, 1818, Henrietta May, dan. of Ephraim and Abigail Chan- 
dler May. She d. Jan. 28, 1822; he m. 3d, Nov. 10, 1823, 
Lucy May. dau. of Asa and Anna Fillebrowne May. She d. 
March 20, 18-13 ; he m. 4th, April 28, 1845, Betsey Buel. She 
d. June 18, 1877. Mr. Child was a farmer in West Fairlee, 
Orange Co.. Yt.. where he died April 8, 1861. 

N 



186 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Mr. Child was a man of fine constitution, of ruddy com- 
plexion, in stature nearly or quite six feet, broad shouldered, 
deep chested, weighing nearly 200 pounds. He first settled in 
Woodstock, Ct., afterwards removed to West Fairlee, Vt, 
where he spent the balance of his days. He was a citizen of 
much public spirit, of earnest purposes, sound in judgment, 
which gave efficiency to a life of usefulness and gained the es- 
teem of his fellow townsmen. He was an intelligent man, 
well informed on the topics of the times, a true patriot and 
] philanthropist, and a sincere Christian. He died in the seventy- 
second year of his age. 
| Seventh Generation.] Children: 

[By first marriage.] 

968 i. Eleanor Ltjcretia Child, I), in Woodstock, Ct., April 1, 1816, 
in. Ralph Perry. 

[By second marriage ] 

969. ii. Abbie Chandler Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., April 22, 1819, 
m. Calvin M Holbrook. 

970. iii. Ephraim Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., Aug. 1, 1821, d. Sept. 
24, 1823. 

[By third marriage.] 

971. iv. Asa May Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt,, Nov. 8, 1824, m. Oct. 
22, 1857, Mary E. Wadleigh. 

972. v. Henry Child, Jr.. b. in West Fairlee, Vt , March 31, 1826, d. 
March 24, 1875. No children. 

973. vi. George May Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt.. April 24, 1831, m. 
Rosina Falls. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

968. i. Eleanor Lucretia Child, eldest child of Henry 
and Lucretia (Child) Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, April 1, 1816, 
m. Dec. 26, 1838, Ralph Perry, a farmer of Chester, Vt. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

974. i. Mary Lucretia Pekry, 1> Sept 2, 1839, m. Sept. 7, 1872, Eugene 
Fred Bigelow. 

975. ii. Newsome Perry, b. April 14. 1841, d. Aug. 3, 1848. 

976. iii. George Wilson Perry, b. Aug. 4. 1842. 

977. iv. Anna Perry, b. Sept, 13, 1844, d. Dec, 10, 1845. 

978. v. Elizabeth Perry, b. July 24, 1846, d. Nov. 30, 1850. 

979. vi. Henry Child Perry, b Jan. 25, 1848, m. Jan 30, 1873, Rosa 
Duklee. She d. Jan. 26. 1875. 

980. vii. Litcy May Perry, b. Aug. 30, 1S50. 

981. viii. Elmira Rosetta Perry, b. Feb. 15, 1852, m. Nov. 9, 1878, 
Wallace Miles Knowlton. 

982. ix. John Perry, b. May 5, 1853. d. July, 1854. 

983. x. Alice Sophia Perry, b. May 29, 1S55, d. Nov, 16, 1863. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 187 

984. xi. James .Madison Perky, b. .lime 17, 1857, in. June 28, 1879, 
Lura Annette Perry. 

985. xii. Edgah Everett Perry b. Aug. 21, 1859, <l. Nov. <;. 1863. 

[Seventh Generation. 

969. ii. Ariue Chandler Child, second child and second 
dan. of Henry Child, by Henrietta May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
April 22, 1819, m. Sept. 22, 1848, Calvin M. Holbrook, of West 
Fairlee, Yt. She d. Feb. 11, 1852. He died Dec. 29, 1870. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

986. i. Abbie Child Holrrook, 1>. in West Fairlee, N't., July 14. 1849. 

987. ii. Henrietta May Holbrook, b. in West Fairlee, Yt., Oct. 5, 
1851. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

971. iv. Asa May Child, fourth child and second son of 
Henry Child, by Lucy May, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., Nov. 8, 
1824-, m. Oct. 20, 1857, Mary E. Wadleigh, of Lyme, N. H. 
Mr. Child is a farmer in West Fairlee. Vt. 
[Eighth Generation. J Children: 

988. i. Alice May Child, b. it West Fairlee, Vt., Aug. 1, 1863. 

989. ii. Nellie May Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt,, April 17, 1866. 

990. iii. Asa Irving Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., Jan. 11, 1868, d. 
April 13, 1879. 

991 iv. Lucy May Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt„ Oct. 4, 1872. 

[Seventh Generation,] 

973. vi. George May Child, sixth child and third son of 
Henry Child, by Lucy May, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., April 24, 
1831, ra. Eosina Falls, of Westford, Mass. They reside at 

Ayer. Middlesex county, Mass. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child : 
992. i. George Henry Child, b. in Ayer, Mass., Sept, 26, 1863. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

909. v. Dea. Luther Child, fifth child and second son of 
Capt. Willard and Lydia Morse Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
March 19, 1791, m. twice: 1st, Jan. 25, 1815, to Pamelia Child, 
dau. of Col. Chester and Sarah May Child, of Woodstock, Ct. ; 
she was b. 1790, d. April 15, 1851 ; 2nd, to Susan Walker, 
dau. of Leonard and Chloe Child Walker, of Stafford, Vt. She 
was b. May 22, 1 792. She still lives at 88 years of age. He died 
Jan. 30, 1860, on the old homestead, when the ownership went 
into the hands of one of his children. Deacon Child was a man 
of much intelligence, and active in the affairs of life. His can- 



188 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

dor, amicable disposition and clear judgment, rendered him a 
safe and reliable counsellor. In 1824, he was elected Deacon 
in the Congregational church, which he held till his death. His 
cheerful hospitality rendered his home a place of pleasant resort 
for kindred and friends, while the stranger was treated with con- 
sideration and kindness. His memory is warmly cherished by 
a large circle of acquaintances. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

993. i. Clinton Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May, 3, 1817, lives unni. 
in the old homestead. 

984. ii. Sarah May Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 18, 1818, in. Rev. 
Henry Morse, d. in Union City, Mich , without children. 

995. iii. Asa Thurston Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 7, 1820, in. 
March 11, 1845, Roxana Lyon. 

996. iv. Edward Mouse Child, b. ii. Woodstock, Ct , April 15, 1822, 
d. young. 

997. v. Luther S. Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct . May 12, 1824, d. young. 

998. vi. Mary Ann Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 16, 1826, m. Mar. 
12, 1852, J . W. Leavitt. 

990. vii. Pamelia Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 12. 1829. 
1000 viii. Ezra Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 6, 1830, d. young. 

1001. ix. Susan A. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 3, 1831, mini., re- 
sides in Woodstock. 

1002. x. Lydia Morse Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 4, 1834, d yg. 

[Seventh Generation. J 

995. iii. I)ea. Asa Thurston Child, third child and second 
son of Dea. Luther and Pamelia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
June 7, 1820, m. by Bev. Mr. Marsh, March 11, 1845, to Rox- 
ana Lyon, dan. of Dea. Moses and Tryphena Lyon, of Wood- 
stock, Ct. He died Feb. 10, 1859. Mrs. Child resides in South 
Woodstock, Ct. The substantial characteristics of an honored 
father seem to heave been the inheritance of a worthy son. In- 
telligent and earnest purposes, gave impulse to his activities. 
After his marriage he settled as a farmer in South Woodstock, 
Ct., and identified himself in the moral and material interests 
of the parish. The wisdom of his counsels was manifest by the 
esteem and confidence in which he was held by his fellow citi- 
zens. He was specially valued as a pillar in the church of 
which he was an esteemed officer, having been early chosen as 
one of its deacons. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1003. i. Henry Thurston Child, b. in South Woodstock, Ct.. June 26, 
1816, m. May 5, 1875, Ella E. Fitts. 



I. 
AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 189 

1004. ii. Mary Elizabeth Cheld, b. in South Woodstock, Ct., March 26, 
1841), in. Nov. 29. 18T5, John Newton Green. 

1005. iii. Edward Moses Child, b. in Smith W Istock, Ct., Aug. '24. 

1851. A physician in Meriden, Ct. 

100(i. iv. Florence Augusta Child, b. in South Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 
31, 1858. *■ 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1003. i. Henry Thurston Child, eldest child of Dea. Asa 
Thurston and Roxana Lyon Child, b. in South Woodstock, Ct., 
June 26, 1S46. in. by Rev. H. Hyde, in Pomfret, Ct.. May 5, 
1S75, to Ella E. Fitts, dan. of Lyman and Harriet Fitts, of 
Pomfret, Ct. Mr. Child resides in South Woodstock, Ct., on 
his father's homestead. A man held in high esteem by his fel- 
low townsmen, as honorable and upright, intelligent, enterpris- 
ing and successful in business. A warm supporter of educa- 
tional and religious institutions; and like his father and grand- 
father, a worthy office bearer in the Congregational church. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1007. i. Alfred Thurston Child, b. in South Woodstock, Ct . March 
10, 1876. 

1008. ii. Edward Lyman Child, b. in South Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 6, 
1877. 

1009. iii. Richard Lyon Child. Ii. in South Woodstock, Ct.. March 3, 
1879. 

[Eighth Generation. | 

1004. ii. Mart P'lizareth Child, second child, eldest dan. 
of Dea. Asa Thurston and Roxana Lyon Child, b. in South 
Woodstock, Ct,, March 26, 1849, m. by Rev. N. Beach, Nov. 
29, 1875, to John Newton Green, son of John J. and Hannah 
Green, of Putnam, Ct. They reside in Greenboro, North Car- 
olina. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1010. i. Henry Jewett Green, b. 1878. 

[Seventh Generation] 

998. vi. Mary Ann Child, sixth child and second dan. of 
Dea. Luther and Panielia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 16, 
1826, m. March 10, 1852, J. W. Leavitt. He d. Dec. 4, ]f864. 
Mrs. Leavitt resides on the old homestead, built by Henry Child, 
her great-grandfather, the ownership having been retained by 
his direct descendants to the present date. 



190 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1011 i. Herbert Leavitt, b. Woodstock, Ct., May 26, 1853, m. Aug. 
19, 1874, Evelyn L. Hebbard. 

1012. ii. Luther Leavitt, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 26, 1855. 

1013. iii. Susan A. Leavitt, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 21, 1858. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1011. i. Herbert Leavitt, eldest child of Mary Ann Child 
and J. W. Leavitt, b. may 26, 1851, m. Aug. 19, 1874, Evelyn 
L. Hebbard. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1014. i. Wallace Herbert Leavitt, b. May 28, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

910. vi. Rev. Wtllard Child, D.D., sixth child of Capt. 
Willard Child, by Sylvia Child, (2nd m.) third son, b. in Wood- 
stock, Ct., Nov. 14, 1790, m. Sept. 13, 1S27, Katherine Grris- 
wold Kent, dau. of Rev. Dan and Betsey Griswold Kent, of 
Benson, Vt. She was b. in Benson, Feb. 7, 1805, and d. Feb. 
26, 1851. He d. Nov. 13, 1877, 81 years of age. He graduat- 
ed at Yale College, New Haven. Ct, the year we are not able to 
state. 

Dr. Child was a man of quiet and easy dignity ; justly admir- 
ed for his attractive personel. In stature he was nearly six feet, 
possessing a fine physical development. His muscular power 
in early youth was unusual. In his school-boy days, he was 
the pride of his associates ; he stood at their head as an athletic, 
and usually won the victory in warmly contested games. In 
riper manhood, his strength was vigorously tested in resisting 
an attack by an insane man of great muscular power, which oc- 
curred on his father's farm on the occasion of one of his visits to 
the ancestral home, being suddenly attacked while in the field 
near his father's laborers, by the man alluded to. The men 
were astonished at the ease with which the Dr. held his assailant, 
till he was bound with cords and rendered harmeless. There 
was a charm of great fascination about Dr. Child. His large 
blue eye, beaming with the light'of intelligence; his benignant 
countenance, and his deep and mellow voice, invested him with 
a power to win those who came within the reach of his magnetic 
presence. The simplicity of his manners, his graceful and 
easy bearing, his sympathetic nature, his abounding good will, 
were elements of his power over men. Buoyant, hopeful, rich in 



\M> HIS DESCENDANTS. 191 

anecdote, he was always a welcome guest among friends and 
acquaintances. By his personal attractions, he drew to his side 
such as valued the instructions of a wise and intelligent teacher. 
His intellectual grasp was of high order. His native powers, 
which were of no ordinary cast, received a culture which gave 
him rank among scholars and statesmen. 

As a public man. he was admired, honored and trusted; he 
was without ostentation and undue ambition. T<> his social 
nature all ambitious longings were subordinated. Life was 
much more to him in the quiet circle of appreciative friends, 
than in the glare of public fame. To serve the Master in hum- 
ble private homes, in ministration to the sick and bereaved, was 
far more congenial to his feelings than to receive theadnlations 
of an admiring, popular assembly ; and his power to hold the 
attention of an alulience was scarcely excelled. In pulpit oratory, 
in which he was by no means deficient, there was nothing of 
the florid and gushing method. Language, simple and direct, 
conveyed his thoughts to the conscience and the understanding 
of his audience with great effect. But the social element in Dr. 
Child was the secret of his success. His free and kindly man- 
ner with all classes gave him influence over men, and won to 
his confidence a large element in the community. Entering, as 
he readily did, into the sympathies of men in their varied pur- 
suits and experiences, he easily touched the springs of their 
nature and drew them into sympathy with sentiments of high 
morality and christian obligation. Among the marked charac- 
teristics of Dr. Child, was his love of nature. 

But the great work of his profession was paramount. His 

ministry was a prolonged one, covering a period of more than 

half a century. The obituary, written bv one unknown to us, 

taken from the Congregalionalist, briefly sums up the fields of 

his labors, and pays a just and beautiful tribute to his memory : 

Willard Child, D. D., born at Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 14, 1796; graduated 
at Vale College and Andover Seminary: settled as pastor successively in 
Pittsford, Vt.. Norwich, Ct., Lowel. Mas-., and Castleton, Vt ; performing 
subsequently several years* ministerial labor in North Brookfield, Mass., 
Crown Point and Mooers, X. Y.. and dying at the last named place Nov. 13, 
1ST? (lacking thus but one day of eighty-one years) — such arc the chief cut- 
ward factsof the history of a man affectionately remembered by all to whom 
he ever ministered in the gospel, or who came within the sphere of his per- 
sonal acquaintance. 



192 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

These mere facts give evidence of a long life and a varied and protracted 
ministry. He graduated from college and seminary at a younger age than is 
common, and he was able to fulfill some ministerial labor to within compar- 
atively few months of his death. His, therefore, has been a service in our 
churches which, on the ground of its continuity and extent alone, is worthy 
of public notice. 

But Dr. Child's ministerial service is not to be estimated by its duration 
only. Its quality was more marked than its continuance. Few, if any, 
men have brought into our Congregational service a richer nature than his. 
Whether looked at on its intellectual or emotional side: whether considered 
in respect to the extent and quality of its cultivation, or its various power 
to influence and touch other men, his was a spirit of unusual opulence of 
endowment. 

And this large, rich nature was well habited in a singularly pleasing and 
commanding bodily presence. Indeed, when the present writer looks back 
twenty-five years, and calls up to his mind the tout ensemble of Dr. Child's 
presence, manner, voice, and substantial utterance, as he then remembers 
him in the pulpit, he is free to say that the whole was as near perfection as 
he has ever known. 

His felicity of expression, his aptness of quotation, his delicacy of allusion, 
betrayed a familiarity, quite unusual in even our most cultivated clergy, 
with the whole range of general literature, and especially its poetic depart- 
ment. He was in truth a poet, without the habit of verse. Yet his preach- 
ing wanted nothing of the vigor and manliness more common to natures 
less refined. 

With such qualifications, it is not surprising that Dr. Child should have 
been a widely admired preacher. Yet unquestionably a wider and more 
enduring repute would have belonged to him had he been a more ambitious 
man, and not as easily contented with the satisfactions of friendship and of 
books as he was. He lacked something of that strenuousness which was 
necessary to bring out the best possibilities of his reputation. 

But to himself, and to his immediate acquaintance, any such loss may 
well have beeii made good by the enjoyment given and received in that 
social intercourse, which was at once a pleasure and a power. Through this 
channel went out from him not a little portion of his best efficiency in help- 
ing others. And by it hundreds wlfo have known him will remember him 
affectionately and long, as one of the most attractive and inspiring men and 
ministers they have ever met. 

His remains were brought from Mooers to Pittsford, the scene of his ear- 
liest ministry, and buried beside those of his earliest friends: 

" Among familiar names to rest, 
And in the places of his youth." 

<;. L. w. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1015. i. Willard A Child, b. in Pittsford. Yt,, Sept. 16, 1828, m. March 
26, 1863, Emma Knapp. 

1010. ii. Cephus H. Child, b. in Pittsford, Vt„ Jan. 17, 1830, d. Aug. 31, 
1831. 

1017. iii Katharine Kent Child, b. in Pittsford. Yt., Feb. 8, 1833. m. 
Rev. Edward Ashley Walker. March 25, 1863. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. \ ( .K\ 

1018. iv. Fannie P. G. Child, b. in Pittsford, Vt., Oct. 1. 1838, d. Nov. 
23, 1843. 

1019. v. Charles II. Child, b. in Pittsford, Vt., Dec. 20, 1840, d. Nov. 
14. 1843. 

1020. vi. Emma Juliette Child, b, in Pittsford Vt . Jan. 25, L846, d. 
Aug. 14, 1847. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1015. i. Willard A. Child. M. D.. eldest child of Rev. 
Dr. Willard and Katharine Kent Child, b. in Pittsford, Vt., 
Sept. 16, 1S2S, m. March 26, 1868. Emma Knapp, dau. of Abel 
Knapp, Esq., of Mooers, Clinton Co., N. Y. Esq. Knapp went 
to Mooers at an early day and established himself in the mer- 
cantile and lumber trade, which he still successfully pursues. 

Dr. Willard A. Child was graduated at the Medical Col- 
lege at Castleton. Vt., in 1857, and commenced his practice 
in the town of Mooers. X. Y., afterwards removed to Pitts- 
ford, Vt., his native town. Previous to his medical course 
he made several sea vo} r ages, one of which was around the 
w r orld. At the breaking out of the civil war. Dr. W. A. Child 
was the first in the town of Pittsford. Vt, to enroll for volun- 
teer service in the Union Army. He was immediately ap- 
pointed assistant surgeon in the 4th Volunteer Regiment of 
Infantry of A^ermont. At the expiration of the three months' 
service he returned to his home, but soon after went back to 
the army, and was again appointed assistant surgeon of the 4th 
Regiment, Shortly after he was promoted to surgeon in the 
10th Vol. Reg't. Vt.. then to brigadier surgeon, and finally to 
the post of division surgeon, and served through the entire 
war. He performed the rirst surgical opewtion on the field 
which took place at Big Bethel. His army record is a highly 
honorable one. He was in twentv-eiyht or twenty-nine battles. 
After his marriage in 1S63, his wife was with him during the 
greater part of the remaining campaign, rendering sympathy 
and aid to wounded and dvino- soldiers. At the close of the 
war. Dr. W. A. Child resumed his practice in the town of 
Mooers, 1ST. Y., where he spent the balance of his life. His 
health was impaired by exposure in the camp, and his days 
were much shortened in eonsequence. His professional life 
was a busv one, and one which secured him flattering regard 
among his patrons. Dr. W. A. Child was talented and well 
educated. His opportunities for general knowledge were an- 



19-± BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS. 

usually favorable and well appropriated. He formed intelligent 
opinions from observation and reading, which made him at 
home among literary as well as business men. While he pos- 
sessed the characteristics and qualifications that fitted him for 
manly duties in his profession and as a citizen, the finer feel- 
ings, developed only in the sanctuary of the domestic circle, 
were not lacking. His love for his revered and aged father 
prompted the tender ministries which filial affection only can 
supply. The last years of his father were spent in his family, 
where he enjoyed the attentions and loving sympathies of a 
dutiful son, and not less self-sacrificing and cheerful ministra- 
tions of a much loved daughter-in-law, whose devotion could 
not have been more earnest and loving in an own child. It 
was in his last sickness only that Dr. W. A. Child learned of 
our enterprise of publishing a Genealogy of the Child Family. 
In a communication from his surviving companion, which was 
received soon after his decease, she informed me that her hus- 
band expressed much interest in the success of the work, and 
that it had been his ourpose to contribute some incidents and 
experiences in his own history,- -a failure which we sincerely 
regret. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child : 

1021. i. Edward Willard Levi Child, b. in Mooers, Clinton Co., N. Y. r 
Dec. 29, 1863. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1017. iii. Katharine Kent Child, third child and eldest 
dau. of Rev. Dr. Willard and Katharine Griswold Kent Child, 
b. in Pittsford, Vt., Feb. 8, 1833, m. March 25, 1863, Rev. Edward 
Ashley Walker, sou of Alfred and Eunice Minor Walker of 
New Haven, Ct. 

Mr. Walker was a clergyman of the Congregational church ; 
settled in Worcester, Mass., and died of consumption a few 
years after his settlement. Mrs. Katharine Child Walker is a 
lady of much talent, of some literary taste and ability, and has 
written several juvenile books for Sabbath schools, and contri- 
buted occasionally articles for the monthlies. She resides in 
New Haven, Ct. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child : 

1022. i. Ethel C. Walker, b. Feb. 25, 1804. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 195 

[Sixth Generation.] 

911. vii. Lydi a Child, seyenth child and fourth dau. of 
Capt. Willard (by Sylvia) Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 
29, '1798. m. Nov. 11, 1821, Erastus May of Woodstock Ho 
was b. N"ov. 2, 1796, d. May 3, 1873. She d. Jan. 11. 1871. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

10-28. i. George M. May. b. in Woodstock, Ct,, J unc 14. 1823, d. Jan. 11, 
1825. 

1024. li. Betsey May, b. in Woodstock, CI . Nov. 14, 1825. 

1025. iii. Edward May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 23, 1828. 

1026. iv. Irving May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 27, 1830. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

912. viii. Sylvia Child, eighth child and fifth dau. of Capt. 
Willard (by Sylvia) Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 28, 1800, 
m. Sept. 30, 1824, Elisha C. Walker, son of Capt. Alfred and 
Betsey Child Walker. He was b. Sept , 1797, d. March 28, 
1871. Mrs. Walker died — date not given. 

Mi\ Walker was a man of earnest and honest purposes, and 
devoted to every public enterprise looking to the benefit of so- 
ciety ; a man of decided temperance principles, and a warm ad- 
vocate for the abolition of slavery ; a man whose aims in life 
were broad and benevolent — living for others quite as much as 
for himself. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1027. i. Henry Kihk Walker, b. Aug. 7, 1827, in. June, 1854, Mary 
Northrop. 

1028. ii. Mary Ann Walker, b. Aug. 5, 1829, unm , resides with her 
brother in New Haven, Ct. 

1029. iii. Alfred Ashley Walker, b. Sept. 5, 1831, shot through the 
chest in the late civil war, at Vicksburg, Miss , May 22, 1863. 

1030. iv. James Walker, b. March 18, 1834, in Aug. 30, 1864, Martha 
Johnson. 

1031. v. Sylvia Elizabeth Walker, b. May 18, 1837, teacher in Chi- 
cago, 111. 

1032. vi. Francis Elisha Walker, b. Jan. 22, 1840, m. 1867, Lucy R. 
Pitney. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1027. i. Henry Kirk Walker, eldest child of Sylvia Child 
and Elisha Walker, b. Aug. 27, 1827, m. June, 1854, Mary 
Northrop. Mr. Walker is a cabinet ware dealer in New Ha- 
ven, Ct. 



196 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 
1033 i. Alfred Elisha Walker, b. Aug. 27, 1855. 

1034. ii. Mary Northrop Walker, b. Aug. 31, 1857. 

1035. iii. Lizzie Maude Walker, b. July 15, 1859. 

1036. iv. Henky Kirke Walkek, Jr., b. Jan. 16, 1864. 

1037. v. Violette Walker, b. Oct. 18, 1871. 

1038. vl. Emily Smith Walker, b. Sept. 28, 1872. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1030. iv. James Walker, fourth child and third sou of Syl- 
via Child and Elisha Walker, b. March 18, L834, m. Aug. 30, 
1864, Martha Johnson. Mr. Walker is a partner with his 
brother, Henry Kirk Walker, in the cabinet business. Besides 
in New Haven, Ct. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1039. i. Edith Child Walkek, b. July 6, 1865. 

1040. ii. Cornelia Howe Walker, b. June, 1868. 

1041. iii. Margaret Ashley Walker, b. Sept. 1, 1869. 

1042. iv. Alice Johnson Walker, b. Aug. 13, 1871. 

1043. v. James Walker, Jr., b. Jan. 25, 1874. 

1044. vi. Curtis Howe Walker, b. 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1032. vi. Francis Elisha Walker, sixth child and fourth 
son of Sylvia Child and Elisha Walker, b. Jan. 22, 1840, m. 
1867, Lucy R. Pitney. Mr. Walker is a very energetic and 
reliable citizen, in Chicago, 111. ; a bridge and car builder. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1045. i. Frank Ashley Walkek, b. April 8, 1869. 

1046. ii. Ernst Leighton Walker, b. June 31, 1871. 

1047. iii. Amv Walker, I>. June 1, 1873. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

013. ix. Cynthia Child, ninth child and sixth dau. of 
Capt. Willard and Sjdvia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 
12, 1804, m. Dec. 16, 1828, Trenck May, son of Nehemiah and 
Nancy Morse May ; he was b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 19, 1800, 
and d. April 27, 1876. As his father before him, Mr. May was 
an extensive cattle dealer, as well as successful farmer. Bos- 
ton, Albany and New York were his principal markets. Mrs. 
Cynthia Child May is the youngest child of Capt. Willard and 
Sylvia Child, and the last representative in her generation of 
her father's family. As a mother and friend, she is loved for 
her affectionate disposition and her gentleness of manners; per- 
sonally attractive, her charms are crowned with sincere and 
consistent piety. 



A XI) HIS DESCENDANTS. 107 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1048. i. Henry May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 13, 182!), m. Ellen D. 
Child. [Children given in connection with the mother, No. 838.] 

1049. ii. Sylvia Child May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 25, 1831, m. 
George Morse. They have no children. 

1050. iii. Willard Child May. b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 1, 1834, d. 
July 2. 1840. 

1051. iv. Ellen May, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Oct. 4, 1836, in. Rev. Henry 
Francis Hyde. 

1052. v. Willaki) May, li. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 23, 1840; lives, unm. 
on the homestead. 

1053. vi. Matilda Jane May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 21, 1843. 

1054. vii. Anna Cynthia May, b. in Woodstock, April 15, 1847, in. June 
21, 1877, Darius Mathewson Adams, a fanner of Pomfret, Ct. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1(>51. iv. Ellen May, second dan. and fourth child of Cyn- 
thia Child and Trenck May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 4, 1836, 
m. about 1862, Rev. Henry Francis Hyde, son of Win. Henry 
and Harriet Young Hyde of Brookline, Ct, He graduated 
from Amherst College, Mass , in 1859, studied Theology in 
Union Theological Seminary, New York City, and at East. 
Windsor, Ct. ; now settled over the Congregational church in 
Rockville, Tolland county, Conn. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1055. i. Arthur May Hyde, b. Sept. 14, 1S64. 

1056. ii. Ehnest Alfred Hyde, b. March 27, 1807, d. Dec, 1867. 

1057. iii. Clara Anna Hyde, b. Dec. 11, 1868. 
1058 iv. Margaret Ellen Hyde, b. Dec. 14, 1870. 

1059. v. Bkrtha Child Hyde, b. June 17, 1874. 

1060. vi. Marel Harriet Hyde, b. Dec. 7, 1877. 

[Fifth Generation. J 

868. ix. Rebecca Child, ninth child and fifth dan. of Henry 
and Dorothy Child (Dorothy a dau. of Nathaniel Child), b. in 
Woodstock, Ct, Aug. 26, 1762, m. Nov. 27, 1791, Luther 
Baldwin. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1061. i. Dolly Child Baldwin, 1). Sept. 13, 1795, lives, unm., in North 
Woodstock, Ct. 

1062. ii. Henry Baldwin, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Sept. 12, 1797, d. Aug. 
15, 1863. 

1063. iii. Levi Baldwin, b. Jan. 8, 1798, d. Aug. 11, 1870. 

1064. iv. Sally Baldwin, b. Nov. 26,1800, unm.. resides in North Wood- 
stock, Ct 

1065. v. Luther Baldwin, Jr., b. July 14, 1803, d. Oct., 1876. 

1066. vi. Thomas Baldwin, b. Feb. 25, 1805, d. Aug., 1866. 



198 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Fourth Generation.J 

31. v. Mehitable Child, fifth child and second dau. of 
Ephraim and Priscilla Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 
8, 1718, rn. July 3, 1741, Nehemiah Lyon, b. 1719, in Wood- 
stock, Ct. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1067. i. Martha Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1742, m. Eliakim May. 

1068. ii. Elisha Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1744, d. 1767, by the acci- 
dental discharge of a gun at a military training. 

1069. iii. Amasa Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1745, m. Martha Dana. 

1070. iv. Aaron Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1748, m. Elizabeth May; 
no children. 

1071. v. Levina Lyon, b in Woodstock, Ct., 1750, m. Peleg Corbin; d. 
1788. 

1072. vi Lyman Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1853, m. Hannah Corbin, 
1777. 

1073. vii. Mehitable Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1758, m. Samuel 
Corbin. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1067. i. Martha Lyon, eldest child of Mehitable Child and 
Nehemiah Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1742, m. Eliakim May, 
March, 1770, d. 1815. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1074. i. Mary May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1772, m. Jerry Sheppard 

1075. ii. Nehemiah May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1773, m. Nancy Morse, 
dau. of Dr. David Morse of Woodstock, Ct., who removed with his son, Da- 
vid Morse, Jr., to Exeter, Otsego county, N. Y. 

1076. iii. Mehitable May, b in Woodstock. Ct., 1774, m. John Phillips. 

1077. iv. Eliakim May, b. in Woodstock. Ct., 1776, m. Hannah Brad- 
ford. 

1078. v. Ezra May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1780, m Chloe Plumb. _ 

1079. vi. Amasa May, b. in Woodstock, Ct , 178?, m. Betsey. Clark. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1074. i. Mary May, eldest child of Martha Lyon and Elia- 
kim May, and grandchild of Mehitable Child and Nehemiah 
Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1772, m. Jerry Sheppard, who set- 
tled in Exeter, Otsego county, N. Y. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1080. i. Elisha Sheppahd, m. Jerusha Angell of Exeter, N. Y. 

1081. ii. Martha Lyon Sheppard, m. Copeland, both dead. 

1082. iii. Olive Sheppard, d. unm. 

1083. iv. Eliakim Sheppahd, m. Miss Coates. 

1084. v. Jerry Sheppard, Jr., m. Laura Curtiss, dau. of Agur Curtiss. 

1085. vi. David Sheppard, in. a Miss Bailey. 

1086. vii. Mary Sheppard, m. Jos. Robinson. 



AN' I) BIS DESCENDANTS. 199 

1087. viii. Caroline Sheppard, d. unm. 

1088. ix. Asa Sheppard, m. 

1089. x. Parsenia Sheppard, in. a Mr. Richards. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1075. ii. Nehemiah May, eldest son and second child of 
Martha Lyon and Eliakim May, and grandchild of Mehitable 
Child Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1773, in. Nancy Morse, dan. 
of Dr. David Morse of Woodstock, Ct. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

1090. i. Don May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1799. 

1091. ii. Tkenck May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1800, in, Cynthia Child. 

[See general Xo. 1048.] 

1092. iii. Pitt May, b. in Woodstock, Ct. 

1093. iv. Malona May, b. in Woodstock, Ct. 

1094. v. Martha May, b. in Woodstock, Ct. 

1095. vi. Matilda May, li. in Woodstock, Ct. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1076. iii. Mehitable May, third child of Martha Lyon and 
Eliakim May, granddan. of Mehitable Child and Nehemiah Ly- 
on, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1774, in. 1794, John Phillips, who 
settled in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., soon after his marriage. 
He had ten children, two eldest born in Woodstock, Ct, the 
others were born in Exeter, N. Y. He died in 1843. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1096. i. Polly Phillips, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug., 1795, m. 1818. Na- 
than Tucker. 

1097. ii. Tempa Phillips, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July, 1796. d. unm., in 
Ezeter, 1823. 

1098. iii. John Phillips, Jr., b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., X. Y., Oct., 1798, 
m. 1832, Olive Babcock. 

1099. iv. Ezra Phillips, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., 1800, d. 1804. 

1100. v. Christiana Phillips, h. in Exeter, Otsego Co., X. Y., 1802, 
lives in Binghamton, unm. 

1101. vi. Mandana Phillips, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Dec, 1804_ 
d. July, 1863, unm. 

1102. vii. Marietta Phillips, b. in Exeter. Otsego Co., N. Y., July, 
1807, m. Dr. John C. Gorton. 

1103. viii. Seth Phillips, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., X. Y., 1809, m. 1st, 
1834, Mary Carver, 2d, . 

1104. ix. Marcia Maria Phillips, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., 
March, 1811, m. April, 1832, Edward McKinney. 

1105. x. Levantia PniLLiPs, b. in Exeter, X. Y., Nov. 15, 1815, m. Aug., 

1849, James Dobbin. He d. . She resides in Providence, R. I., with 

an only child, a son. 



200 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1093. i. Polly Phillips, eldest child of Mehitable May and 
John Phillips, and great-grandchild of Mehitable Child Lyon, 
b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug., 1795, m. 1818, Nathan Tucker, 
who was born in Woodstock, Ct., 1790. Mrs. Tucker died in 
Binghamton, N. Y., 1875. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1106. i. Carloss Tucker, b. in Exeter, N. Y., in 1822, is married, (name 
not given,) has children: is a practicing physician in New York. 

1107. ii. Pitt L. Tucker, b. in Exeter, N. Y.. 1836, m. 1860, Cornelia 
Stagg of Stratford, Ct. He i8 editor of the Binghamton Daily Republiccm. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1098. iii. John Phillips, third child and eldest son of Me- 
hitable May and John Phillips, and great grandchild of Mehit- 
able Child Lyon, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Oct., 1798, m. May 22, 
1832, Olive Babcock, dau. of Dea. Jonas Babcock of Westford, 
N. 7. She was born May 5, 1805, in Westford, N. Y. Mr. 
Phillips d. in Exeter, Dec. 9, 1861. 

Mr. Phillips spent his days in Exeter, living on the old home- 
stead ; was an influential and valuable citizen in the town and 
county. He was specially efficient in promoting the interests 
of the Presbyterian church, in which he was a respected elder 
and deacon for nearly thirty years. Mrs. Phillips was not less 
esteemed for estimable qualities as a mother and neighbor, as 
well as for her Christian consistency and fidelity. Mrs. Phillips 
resides in Oneonta, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1108. i. Ward Irving Phillips, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Sept. 
11, 1833. 

1109. ii. Owen Phillips, b in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., April 27, 1337. 

1110. iii. Judith Campbell Phillips, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N Y., 
May 22, 1839, in. April, 1872, David Thompson, and resides at Mt. Pleasant, 
Iowa. 

1111. iv. Julia Ellen Phillips, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1842. 

1112. v. Amelia Phillips, b. in Exeter, N Y„ Feb. 6, 1845. 

1113. vi. Edward Phillips, b. iii Exeter, N. Y., July 14, 1847, is a civil 
engineer. 

1114. vii. Elizabeth Chester Phillips, b. in Exeter, N. V., Nov. 14, 
1849, d. Jan. 29, 1857. 

1115. viii. Mary Ellen Phillips, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Dec. 24, 1851. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1102. vii. Marietta Phillips, seventh child of Mehitable 
May and John Phillips, and great-grandchild of Mehitable Child 



AND TITS DESCENDANTS. 201 

Lyon, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., July, 1807, m. Dr. John 
C. Gorton, Nov., 1828. She d. Dec., 1842. Dr. Gorton was 
for many years a practicing physician in Gilbertsville, Otsego 
county, N. Y., and Norwich, Chenango county, N. Y., but sub- 
sequently removed to Detroit, Mich. 
| Eighth Generation.] Child : 

1116. i. Helen M. Gorton, b. , in. Israel Holmes, a lawyer, now in 

Chicago, 111. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1103. viii. Seth Phillips, eighth child and third son of 
Mehitable May and John Phillips, and great grandchild of Me- 
hitable Child Lyon, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., in 1809, m. 
1st, 1834, Mary Carver, 2d, Mrs. Amelia (Bradley) Beebe. 

After his first marriage, Mr. Phillips settled at Chenango 
Forks, N. Y. Some years afterwards he removed to Exeter, 
Otsego Co., N. Y., his native place, and was for many years an 
influential citizen in the town, as well as in the county, holding 
the office of justice of the peace many years. Since his second 
marriage, his home has been in Mt. Upton, Chenango Co., N.Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1117. i. John Phillips, b. June 5, 1839, m.Feb. 20, 1862, Mary S. Serib- 
ner. 

1118. ii. Hannah Rebecca Phillips, b. Jan., 1841, m. Sept., 1868, An- 
drew P Merchant. 

1119. iii. Mandana Amelia Phillips, b. Sept., 1843, m. 1861, Alonzo 
H. Sumner. 

1120. iv. Marietta Phillips, b. 1845, m. 1862, Judah Colt. 

1121. v. Sarah E. Phillips, b. 1847, m. Dec, 1868, Geo. W. Robinson. 

1122. vi. Sceva Phillips, b. 1849, num. 

1123. vii. William Henry Phillips, b. 1851, unm. 

1124. viii. Harriet Ann Phillips, b. 1853, m. 1878, Franklin Noyes. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1117. i. John Phillips, eldest child of Seth and Mary Car- 
ver Phillips, b. June 5, 1839, m. Feb. 20, 1862, Mary S. Scrib- 
ner, dau. of John and Kate Scribner, b. in 1841. Mr. Phillips 
resides in Utica, N. Y. ; is a carpenter and joiner by trade. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1125. i. Kate Mary Phillips, b. July 15, 1866. 

1126. ii. John Teft Phillips, b. May 5, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1118. ii. Hannah Kebecca Phillips, second child of Seth 
Phillips and Mary Carver, b. Jan., 1841, m. Sept., 1868, An- 
drew P. Merchant. 

o 



202 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1127. i. Peleg Andrew Merchant, b. Sept., 1870. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1119. iii. Mandaxa Amelia Phillips, third child of Seth 
and Mary Carver Phillips, b. Sept., 1843, m. 1861, Alonzo H. 
Sumner, son of Charles Sumner and Martha Lyon Sumner. 
He resides in Ilion, N. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1128. i. Albert E. (Sumner, b. Sept., 1867. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1120. iv. Marietta Phillips, fourth child of Seth and 
Mary Carver Phillips, b. in 1845, m. in 1862, Judah Colt of 
Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1129. i. Lillian Colt, b. July, 1864. 

1130. ii. Nellie Colt, b. 1868. 

1131. iii. Mary Ann Colt, b. 1871. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1104. ix. Marcia Maria Phillips, ninth child and sixth 
dau. of Mehitable May and John Phillips, and great grandchild 
of Mehitable Child Lyon, b. March, 1811, m. April, 1832, Ed- 
ward McKinney, a merchant. Mr. McKinney died many years 
since. Mrs. McKinney resides in Binghamton. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

1132. i. Edward McKinney, Jr., a graduate of Yale College, is engaged 
in mercantile business in Binghamton, N. Y. ; is married and has three chil- 
dren ; names not given. 

1133. ii. Wm. A. McKinney, a graduate of Yale College, is a practicing 
attorney in Binghamton, N. Y. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1078. v. Ezra May, fifth child of Martha Lyon and Eliakim 
May, and grandchild of Mehitable Child and Nehemiah Lyon, 
b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 8, 1780, m. about 1804 to Chloe 
Plumb, dau. of Joseph Plumb of New Haven, Ct. They set- 
tled in the town of Otsego, Otsego Co., N. Y., at the foot of 
Schuyler's Lake. This part of the town was afterwards attach- 
ed to Exeter in Otsego Co., N. Y. Mrs. May died Nov. 24, 
1816. Mr. May died Nov. 22, 1826. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1134. i. Martha Lyon May, b. in Otsego, N. Y., May 29, 1806, m. May 
25, 1828, Charles Sumner. 

1135. ii. Ezra May, Jr., b. in Otsego, N. Y., May 20, 1808, m. Juliette 
Terry. 



' AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 203 

1136. iii. Chloe Ann May, b. Juno 8. 1810, d. 1868, unm. 

1137. iv. Jennette May, b. Oct. 3, 1812, m. Alfred Furman. 

1138. v. Eakl May, b. in Otsego, N. V., June 6, 1816, d. Oct. 25, 1816. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

118Jr. i. Martha Lyon May, eldest child of Ezra and Chloe 
Plumb May, b. in Otsego, N. Y., May 29, 1806, in. May 25, 
1828, Charles Sumner, son of Dea. Moses Sumner of Burling- 
ton, Otsego Co., N. Y. Mr. Charles Sumner was b. in 1795, d. 
March 12, 1872. Mrs. Sumner resides in the village of Mo- 
hawk, Herkimer Co., N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1139. i. Ambrose D. Sumner, b. in Otsego, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1829, in. Ger- 
trude Van Volkenburg. 

1140. ii. Alonzo H. Sumner, b. Nov 12. 1831, m. 1861, Mandana Phil- 
lips. 

1141. iii. Juliette Sumner, b. in Otsego, N. Y., March 3, 1834, resides 
in Mohawk, unm. 

1142. iv. George B. Sumner, b. in Otsego, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1836, m. Al- 
zin Angell. 

1143. v. Erasmus E. Sumner, b. in Otsego, N. Y., Aug. 20, 1840, d. Oct. 
3, 1868. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1139. i. Ambrose D. Sumner, eldest child of Martha Lyon 
May and Charles Sumner, b. in Otsego, N. Y., Sept. 24, 1829, 
m. 1857, Gertrude Van Volkenburg, dau. of Eev. Daniel Van 
Volkenburg of Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y. Mr. Van Volken- 
burg was for many years the much esteemed pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church in Exeter, N. Y. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1144. i. Helen Norton Sumner, b. Sept., 1858. 

1145. ii. William Sumner, b. April, 1860, d. early. 

1146. iii. Sara Sumner, b. April, 1862, d. early. 

1147. iv. Charles Sumner, b. April, 1864. 

1148. v. Julia Tracy Sumner, b. Dec, 1868. 

1149. vi. Mary Gertrude Sumner, b. Julv 8, 1874. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1112. iv. George B. Sumner, fourth child of Martha Lyon 
May and Charles Sumner, b. in Otsego, N. ? 6, 1836, 

m. March 19, 1866, Alzina, Angell, dau. ^ngell of 

Exeter, N. Y. 

Mr. Angell was a son of one of the ~-rs of the town 

of Exeter, N. Y, and like his fathe ngell, was greatly 

esteemed as one of the leading citi »t town. The name 



204 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



suggests a curious incident which occurred many years since, 
in the locality where many of the name resided. It was a mar- 
riage between two of the name of remote kinship, and recorded 
in the Cooperstown Journal as follows : " Married — On — inst., 
on Angell Hill, by Hon. William Angell, Mr. Ira Angell to 
Miss Lucy Angell, in the presence of seventy Angells." 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1150. i. Agnes E. Sumner, b. Dec. 30, 1862. 

1151. ii. Akthur M. Sumner, ) , . ( b. April 27, 1870 

1152. iii. Annie M. Sumner, ) rwins ' } 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1079. vi. Amasa May, sixth child of Martha Lyon and Eli- 
akim May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1783, m. about 1810, Betsey 
Clark of Schuyler's Lake. Otsego Co., N. Y. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1153. i. Eliza Jane Mat, b. in Otsego, N. Y., May, 1812, ra. 1818, Rich- 
ard Tunniclif of Schuyler's Lake. 

1154. ii. Abelard May, b. in Otsego, N. Y., May 6, 1813, ra. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1154. ii. Abelard May, second child of Amasa May and 
Martha Lyon, b. May 6, 1813, m. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

1155. i. George A. May, keeps a hotel in Boonville, N. Y. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1069. iii. Amasa Lyon, third child of Mehitable Child and 
Nehemiah Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1745, m. Martha Dana. 
He died in the Kevolutionary War. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1156. i. Sally Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct. 

1157. ii. Judaii Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., m. Feb. 18, 1802, Mehitable 
Child, dau. of Dea. Charles Child of East Woodstock. (For children see No. 
1235.) 

1158. hi. Amasa Lyon, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1777, m. a Penniman. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1156. i. Sally Lyon, first child of Amasa Lyon and Martha 
Dana, granddaughter of Mehitable Child (general No. 31), b. in 
Woodstock, Ct., m. Ebenezer Bishop. She d. 1832. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1158£. i. Amasa Bishop. 

1159. ii. Elisha Bishop. 

1160. iii. Adaline Bishop. 

1161. iv. Hezekiah Bishop. 

1162. v. Tabitha Bishop. 

1163. vi. Ebenezek Bishop, Jr. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 205 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1158. iii. Amasa Lyon, Jr., third child of Amasa and 
Martha Dana Lyon, and grandson of Mehitable Child Lyon, b. 

1777, m. 1802. Penniman of Woodstock, Ct. He d. 1840. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1104 i. Sarah Winchester Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., in 1803. 

1105. ii. Aaron M. Lton. 

1100. iii. Jesse P. Lyon. 

HOT. iv. Amasa P. Lyon. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1071. v. Levina Lyon, fifth child of Mehitable Child and 
Nehemiah Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct. 1 750, m. 1773, Peleg Cor- 
bin. She d. 1778. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children : 

1108. i. Patty Corbin. b. in Woodstock, Ct.. 1774, d. 1844, nnm. 

1109. ii. Priscilla Corbin, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1770, m. Rensselaer 
Child. (See No. 592.) 

1170. iii. Eliakim Corbin, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1777, m. 

1171. iv. Ichabod Corbin, b in Woodstock, Ct., 1780; had no children. 

1172. v. Aaron Corbin. b. in Woodstock, Ct.. 1781, m. Betsey Johnson. 

1173. vi. Levina Corbin, b. in Woodstock, Ct , 1786, m. Perrin. 

[Sixth Generation J 

1170. iii. Eliakim Corbin, third child of Levina Lyon and 
Pele2" Corbin. b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1777, m. 
[Seventh Generation ] Children : 

1174. i. Arian Corbin, m Rev. Amos Hollister. 

1175. ii. Abel Corbin. 
1170. iii Horace Corbin. 

1177. iv. Levina Corbin. 

1178. v. Eli Corbin. 

1179. vi. Amanda Corbin. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1172. v. Aaron Corbin, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1781, m. 
Betsev Johnson. Aaron was the fifth child of Levina Lyon and 
Peleg Corbin, and grandchild of Mehitable Child and Nehemiah 

Lyon. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

1180. i. Johnson Corbin. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1173. vi. Levina Corbin, sixth child of Levina Lyon and 
Peleg Corbin, and grandchild of Mehitable Child and Nehemiah 
Lyon, b. 1786, m. ■ Perrin. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

1181. i. Polly Perrin. 



206 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1072. vi. Lyman Lyon, sixth child of Mehitable Child and 
Nehemiah Lyon, b. in Wooodstock, Ct., 1753, m. 1777, Han- 
nah Corbin; m. 2nd, Nov., 1801, Philina 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1182. i. Eliakim Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Nov. 3, 1779, d. June 20, 
1856. 

1183. ii. Samuel Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept, 17, 1784, d. April 16, 
1848. 

1184. iii. Nehemiah Lyon, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Oct. 15, 1786, d. 
April 4, 1840. 

1185. iv. Lyman Lyon, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Aug., 1794, d. April 18, 
1860. 

1186. v. Mehitable Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 25, 1779. 

1187. vi. Patty Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 17, 1781, d. Sept. 26, 
1807. 

1188. vii. Hannah Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept, 6, 1789, d. July 3, 
1850. 

1189. viii. Nancy Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 23, 1792. 

[By his second wife:] 

1190. iv. WillardLyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 9, 1802. Mrs. Lyon, 
d. 1805. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

32. vi. Mary Child, sixth child of Ephraim and Priscilla 

Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, April 12, 1711, m. June 16, 

1747, Stephen May, of Woodstock, Ct. He was b. Nov. 10, 

1721. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1191. i. Elizabeth May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 10, 1748, m. 1770, 
Deac. Aaron Lyon, son of Nehemiah Lyon and Mehitable Child. 

1192. ii. Lucy May, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1750, d. unmarried. 

1193. iii. Molly (Mary) May, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Aug. 25, 1752, m. 
Alpha Child, son of Nathaniel Child. (Alpha was the father of Darius 
Griffin and Spencer Child. (See 1193 repeated.) 

1194. iv. Stephen May, Jr., b. May 23, 1755, in Woodstock, Ct.. m, 

Lived in Fairlee, Vt, ; left a family. 

1195. v. Joanna May, b. Feb. 8, 1757, d. unmarried. 

1196. vi. Ephraim May, b. Nov. 22, 1759, m. Abigail Chandler. 

1197. vii. Sarah May, b. Nov. 30, 1761, m. Col. Chester Child, of North 
Woodstock, Ct. 

1198. viii. Asa May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 4,1764. Lived in Fair- 
lee, Vt. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1196. vi. Ephraim May, sixth child of Mary Child and 

Stephen May, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Nov. 22, 1759, m. Abigail 

Chandler, about 1790. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 207 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1199. i. Henrietta May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 18, 1791. in. Henry 
Child. (See his general No., 908.) 

1200. ii. Asa May, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. Aug. 24, 1798. m. Sally May, 
dau. of John May. 

1201 lii. Stephen May, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1796, d. 1800. 

1202. iv. Seth May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1798, d. 1801. 

1203. v. Elizabeth May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1800,'m.JElias Mason. 

1204. vi. Mary May. b. in Woodstock. Ct., 1803. 

1205. vii. Julia Anna May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1809. d. 1832. unm. 

[Sixtli Generation.] 

1200. ii. Asa May, second child of Ephraim and Abigail 
Chandler May, and grandson of Mary Child and Stephen May, 
b. in Woodstock, Ct, Aug. 24, 1793, m. about 1820, Sally May, 
dau. of John and Sally May. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

1206. i. Elizabeth May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 10, 1821, m. Eras- 
mus Rawson; had no children. 

1207. ii Charles Harris May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 2, 1823, m. 
Harriet P. Child. (For children of Harris May, see No. 827.) 

1208. iii. Ezra C. May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 13, 1825, m. Abbey 
E. Chandler. She died leaving no children. 

1209. iv. Carlo May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 3, 1839, m. March 23, 
1853, Sarah M. Child, dau. of Dea. Wm. Child, of East Woodstock, Ct. 
(For children, see under Dea. William Child ) 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1203. v. Elizabeth May, fifth child of Ephraim and Abi- 
gail Chandler May, b. in 1800, in Woodstock, Ct.. m. 1824, 
Elias Mason. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1210. i. Lucy Mason, b. in Woodstock, Ct., in 1825, in. Augustus Mason, 
d. 1848. 

1211. ii. Abbey C. Mason, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1829. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

34. viii. Capt. Klisha Child, eiglith child and fourth son 
of Ephraim and Priscilla Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
Feb. 11, 1725, m. Jan. 6, 1750, Alice Manning, who was born 
1728, d. 1798. He d. Nov. 22, 1796. 

Captain Elisha Child was a man of strong character and much 
intelligence, and was everywhere prominent in affairs of town, 
state and church. A man of quick perceptions, cool and accur- 
ate judgment, withal of that kindly spirit which wins and 
retains firm friendship. His abilities found ready recognition, 



208 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



and he held various offices of responsibility and honor most 
creditable to himself and fellow citizens. Capt. Child repre- 
sented the town of Woodstock in the General Court of the Col- 
ony of Connecticut for several terms. The patriotic enthusiasm 
of the people of this town, kindled with the first watch-fires of 
the revolution. 

" At a very full meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Woodstock, 
legally warned and held at said Woodstock, on the 21st day of June, A. D. 
1774, Nathaniel Child, Esq., was chosen Moderator. The resolves of the 
House of Representatives were presented by a committee of this corporated 
body, for their consenting to and voting the above resolves, in conjunction 
with the other representatives of this Colony, in General Court assembled. 
As said resolves do honor to the worthy representatives of a free, loyal and 
virtuous people, are very expressive of the sentiments of the inhabitants of 
this town, and by them judged necessary in such a day as this, when we 
have the most convincing proofs of a fixed and determined plan of the 
British administration, to overthrow the liberties of America and subject 
these colonies to a bondage that our father's did not, would not, — and fled 
into the wilderness that they might not— and God grant that we, their pos- 
terity, never may — bear. 

2ndly. Being animated from the consideration of the absolute importance 
of adopting every rational and probable means in our power for the politi - 
cal salvation of our country, we engage to contribute our utmost exertions 
in defence of our American liberties and privileges, and stand ready to join 
our brethren in this and the other American colonies in every possible meas- 
ure that may influence Great Britian to withdraw her oppressive hand : at 
the same time we apprehend that a General Congress consisting of delegates 
from each colony on the Continent is necessary, speedily to be formed that 
the sentiments of the whole may be known and such an unity in measures 
be established as may constitute a strength invincible by tyranny, and break 
out in one general burst against the attempts that are made and making to 
destroy the Constitution of these Governments. 

3rdly. And inasmuch as the promotion, of industry, frugality, economy, 
arts and manufactures among ourselves is of great importance to the good 
of a community, we determine from this very day to live as much within 
ourselves, and purchase as few British goods, wares, and merchandises as 
possible, and give all due encouragement to every useful art among us. 

4thly. It having been judged needful at this alarming crisis, and generally 
come into, that committees of correspondence be appointed, etc., etc, vot- 
ed that Capt. Elisha Child, Charles C. Chandler, Jedediah Morse, Esq.. Capt. 
Samuel McLellan, and Nathaniel Child, Esq., be a committee for maintain- 
ing a correspondence with the towns of this and the neighboring colonies. 

5thly. Voted, that a copy of these votes be printed in the New London 
Gazette, to manifest the deep sense we have of the parliamentary invasion 
of the constitutional rights of British America. 

(A true copy,) 
Attest, ELISHA CHILD, Town Clerk. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 200 

On the requisition of the Contenental Congress, troops were 
raised in all the colonies. Connecticut was prompt to furnish 
her quota Capt, Elisha Child was placed in command of one 
of the first companies organized. On the news reaching Con- 
necticut of the rencontre at Lexington, Mass., Woodstock sent 
several companies, one under Capt. Child, also one under Capt. 
Benjamin Lyon, one under Capt. E. Manning, one under Capt. 
Daniel Lyon, and a troop of horse under command of Capt. 
Samuel McLellan. 

We first find Capt. Elisha Child recorded as a member 
of the General Court in the Session of 1775, when Jonathan 
Trumbull was Governor, and Mathew Griswold Leiut. Gover- 
nor. During this Session, "Capt. Elisha Child, Col. Samuel 
Chapman, Capt. Henry Allyn, Joseph Hopkins, and Mr. Isaac 
Doolittle were appointed a committee severally or in conjunc- 
tion, to search after lead mines in the colony, and directed to 
inform the Governor if any were discovered, that the Governor 
might inform the Continental Congress in the summer session 
of 1776." 

At the same meeting of the General Court, we find Capt. 
Child and others were added to a committee previously appoint- 
ed " to procure fire-arms, and gun locks to supply the State 
Militia in the war."' 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1212. i. Charles Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, then Muddy Brook Parish, 
now East Woodstock, Sept. 15, 1750, d. young. 

1213. ii. Charles Child, 2d, b. in East Woodstock, Ct.. Nov. 22, 1751. in. 
April 13, 1777, Eliza May. 

1214. iii. Alice Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 11, 1753, d. Oct. 25, 
1750. 

1215. iv. Capt. Elias Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 28, 1755, m 1st, 
March 18, 1779, Dorothea Morse, dau. of Dr. Parker Morse; m. 2nd, Mar. 
18, 1790, Sophia Morse, dau. of Dr. David Morse. 

1216. v. Thompson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 12, 1758. d. May 
12, 1760. 

1217. vi. Alice Child, 2nd, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 15. 1760, d. Nov. 
1, 1781. 

1218. vii. Sylvia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct, 31, 1762, in. May 7, 
1795, Capt. Willard Child. For her children, see Capt. Willard, No. 865. 

1219. viii. Betsey Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Dec. 23, 1764, d. early. 

1220. ix. Chloe Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 28, 1767, m. March 
3, 1790, Leonard Walker. 

1221. x. Priscilla Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 19. 1769, d. Oct. 
3, 1775. 



210 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1222. xi. Betsey Child, 2nd, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1773, m. Feb. 21, 
1797, Alfred Walker. 

1223. xii. A daughter: name not given. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1213. ii. Dea. Charles Child, son of Capt. Elisha and 
Alice Manning Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 22, 1751, m. 
April 13, 1777, Eliza May. She was b. 1756, d. 1838, in 
Woodstock, Ct. She was the daughter of Caleb May, of Wood- 
stock. 

Dea. Charles Child marks an era in family descent as the 
inheritor of the homestead of two preceding generations. He 
was a man of fine appearance in his prime, and m old age the 
stamp of youth had not altogether disappeared. He was a staid 
and substantial citizen ; a worthy deacon in the Congregational 
church. Social, hospitable and benevolent. His descendants 
are numerous, and occupying honorable positions in various 
callings in life. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1224. i. Mehitable Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 22, 1779, m.Feb. 
18, 1802, Capt, Judah Lyon, of Woodstock, Ct. 

1225. ii. Caleb Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept 30, 1781, d. June 11, 
1853. unmarried. 

1226. iii. Alice Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 21, 1783, m. Oct. 16, 
1806, George Potter, of Woodstock. 

1227. iv. Hannah May Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 29, 1786, d. 
in 1817, unmarried. 

1229. v. Sally Sumner Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 9, 1787, d. 
Jan. 11, 1792. 

1229^ vi. John Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1789, m. Sept 11, 1831, Alice 
Manning Walker. 

1230. vii. Charles Child, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1791, m. March 
20, 1817, Almira Holmes. 

1231. viii. Eliza Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 24, 1793, m. April 
23, 1863, Rensselaer Coombs. 

1232. ix. Sally Sumner Child, 2nd, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 19. 
1795, d. July 20, 1859, unmarried. 

1233. x. Elias Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 30, 1797, m. April 19, 
1827, Sophronia Meacham. 

1234. xi. Abiel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 6, 1799, m. Feb. 18, 
1831, Henrietta Hall. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1221. i. Mehitable Child, eldest child of Dea. Charles and 
Eliza May Child, b. Aug. 22, 1779, in East Woodstock, Ct., m. 
Feb. 18, 1802, Judah Lyon, son of Amasa and Martha Dana 



LND HIS DESCENDANTS. 211 

Lyon of Woodstock, Ct., and grandson of Mehitable Child, who 
in. Nehemiah Lyon. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1235. i. Elisha Lyox. b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1803, m. Lucy May, 1832. 

1236. ii. Eliza Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1804, m. Dr. Witter. 

1237. iii. Martha D. Lyox. b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1806, ra. Bishop. 

1238. iv. Mehitable Lyon. Ii. in Woodstock, Ct., 1810, in. Anson Fowler. 
She died early, and left no children. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1235. i. Elisha Lyon, eldest child of Mehitable Child and 
Judah Lyon, m. 1st, Lucy May, 1S32. She d. soon after the 
birth of her only child, and Mr. Lyon in. 2d, Rebecca Rice. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

(By first marriage.) 

1239. i. Elisha May Lyox, b. May 11, 1839, in. Oct. 3. 1872, Charlotte 
W. Day: had no children. 

(By second marriage.) 

1240. ii. Lucy May Lyox, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 5, 1842, m. Dec. 7, 
1865, Geo. P. Whitney. 

1241. iii. Abbie Lyox, b. in VVoodstock. Ct., Jan. 5, 1844, d. yonng. 

1242. iv. Charles E. Lyox, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 28, 1845, m. Mar. 
9, 1868, Mary M. Spaulding. 

1243. v. Oliver P. Lyox, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 3, 1847, m. Dec. 2, 
1874, Ellen M. Spaulding. 

1244. vi. William P. Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 19, 1852, unm. 

1245. vii. Sarah E. Lyox, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 25, 1854, m. Nov. 
18, 1874, John B. Morse. 

1246. viii. Hattie E. Lyox, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 14, 1855, unm. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1240. ii. Lucy May Lyox, second child of Elisha Lyon 
and Rebecca Rice, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 5, 1842, m. Dec. 
7, 1865, Geo. P. Whitney. 
[Xinth Generation.] Child: 

1247. i. Erxest W. Whitxey, b. Aug. 11. 1877. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1212. iv. Charles E. Lyon, fourth child and second son of 
Elisha and Rebecca Rice Lyon, b. Feb. 28, 1815, m. March 9, 
1868, Mary M. Spaulding. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1248. i. Edward Sumner Lyon,, b. Feb. 21, 1874. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1213. v. Oliyer P. Lyon, fifth child and third son of Elisha 
and Rebecca Spaulding Lyon, b. March 3, 1847, in. Ellen W. 
Spaulding, Dec, 1874. 



212 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1249. i. Mabel R, Lyon, b. March 26, 1877. 

LEighth Generation.] 

1245. vii. Sarah E. Lyon, sixth child of Elisha and Ke- 
becca Rice Lyon, b. April 25, 1854, m. Nov. 18, 1874, John B. 
Morse. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child : 

1250. i. Josie E. Morse, b. March 19, 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1236. ii. Eliza Lyon, second child of Mehitable Child and 
Judah Lyon, and granddaughter of Dea. Charles Child, b. in 
Woodstock, Ct., 1814, m. 1827, Dr. Asa Witter of Woodstock, 
Ct., who settled in East Woodstock, Ct., as physician and sur- 
geon, and gained much reputation for his skill as a practitioner. 
He was highly esteemed and greatly beloved by citizens of 
Woodstock and vicinity. Mrs Alice W. Child of East Wood- 
stock, Ct., says in one of her many helpful letters to us, "Doctor 
Asa Witter was our physician here in East Woodstock for a 
good many years, very much beloved. Three of his sons are 
physicians and men of character, viz., John, Ebenezer, and Wil- 
ber Fisk Witter, men of ability in their profession, and highly 
esteemed as citizens in their respective communities." 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1251. i. John Witter, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Dec. 31, 1831, m. Mary E. 
Paine. 

1252. ii. Judah L. Witter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1833, m. Rnth Rich- 
ardson. 

1253. iii. Martha Jane Witter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1837, unm. 

1254. iv. Ebenezer Witter, b. in Woodstock, Ct , 1839, in. Ellen S. 
Wright. 

1255. v. Asa Witter, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1846. 

1256. vi. Wilber Fisk Witter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1849. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1251. i. John Witter, M. D., eldest child of Dr. Asa Witter 
and Eliza Lyon, b. 1831, m. April 13, 1856, Mary E. Paine; 
she was b. 1835. He is a physician, settled in Putnam, Ct. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1257. i. Wm. Paine Witter, b. July 23, 1858. 
1258 ii. Frank E. Witter, b. May 21, 1861. 

1259. iii. Mary Agnes Witter, b. Feb. 26, 1863. 

1260. iv. Eliza Lyon Witter, b. March 9, 1865. ) rn . 

- Twins 

1261. v. Abbie Ricard Witter, b. Mar. 9, 1865, d. Sept. 17. 1867. \ 

1262. vi. Henry Paine Witter, b. Aug. 29, 1869. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 213 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1252. ii. Judah L. Witter, second child of Dr. Asa Witter 
and Eliza Lyon, 1). in Woodstock, 1833, m. Huth Richardson, 

1861. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1263. i. Wendell Witter, b. 1867. 

1264. ii. Frank Witter, b. 1869. 

1265. iii. Gracie Witter, b. 1874. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1251. iv. Ebenezer Witter, M. D., fourth child and third 
son of Dr. Asa Witter and Eliza Lyon, b. 1839, m. 1867, Ellen 
S. Wright. Is a physician, and settled in Sturbridge, Mass. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1266. i. Nellie Witter, b. 1868. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1256. vi. Wilber Fisk Witter, M. D., sixth child and 
fourth son of Dr. Asa Witter and Eliza Lyon, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct., 1849, m. 1874, Sally Hooker. They have two children- 
no names given. Dr. Wilber F. Witter resides in Brookfield, 
Mass. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1237. iii. Martha D. Lyon, dau. and third child of Mehit- 
able Child and Judah Lyon, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1806, m. 
Hezekiah Bishop, son of Dr. Ebenezer Bishop and Sarah Lyon. 
Dr. Bishop settled in East Woodstock in 1800, or before, and 
was practicing when Dr. Witter entered upon the profession in 
the same parish, in 1825 or 6. Mrs. Bishop d. Dec. 23, 1877. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1267. i. Sarah Bishop, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1839. 

1268. ii. Ebenezer Bishop, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1841. 

1269. iii. Anna Bishop, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1844. 

1270. iv. Esther Bishop, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1845. 

1271. v. Martha H. Bishop, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1850. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1226. iii. Alice Child, third child and second dau. of Dea. 
Charles and Eliza May Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Oct. 21, 
1783, m. Oct. 6, 1806, Geo. Potter of Woodstock. She d. 1878, 
in her 95th year. He d. 1816. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1272. i. Stephen L. Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1808, m. Sarah C. 
Morse. 

1273. ii. Benjamin Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1810, m. Mary Cham- 
berlain. 



214 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1274. iii. Charles C. Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1812. 

1275. iv. George Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1814,' d. 1836. 

1276. v. Rhodes W. Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1816, d. 1836. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1272. i. Stephen L. Potter, eldest child of Alice Child and 
Geo. Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1808, m. Sarah C. Morse. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1277. 1. George M. Potter, b. 1836, m. Lives in Minnesota. 

1278. ii. Wm. Rhodes Potter, b. 1837, d. in the U. S. service, 1863, in 
the War of the Rebellion. 

1279. iii. Mary E. Potter, b. in 1838. 

1280. iv. Albert E. Potter, b. 1839, m. Mary E. Sumner, 1869. 

1281. v. Charles H. Potter, b. 1842, m.; no children; served in U. S. 
army in late rebellion ; lives in Nebraska. 

1282. vi. S. Dwight Potter, b. 1844, d. 1874. 

1283. vii. Caleb C. Potter, b. 1846, m. Isadore Brown: no children; lives 
in Fall River, Mass. 

1284. viii. Sarah Alice Potter, b. 1848, d. 1807. 

1285. ix. Henry J. Potter, b. 1850. 

1286. x. Newton- R. Potter, b. 1853. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1273. ii. Benjamin Potter, second child and second son of 

Alice Child and George Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1810, m. 

Mary Chamberlain. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1287. i. Mary E. Potter. 

1288. ii. Elisha Potter, m. lives in N. Y. City. 

1289. iii. Cyrus D. Potter, m. Emma Dean. 

1290. iv. Frank Potter, is a clergyman. 

1291. v. Harris Potter. 

1292. vi. Milton Potter, lives in Chicago. 

1293. vii. Charles H. Potter. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1274. iii. Charles C. Potter, son of Alice Child and Geo. 
Potter, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 1812, m. 1838, Maria Walker. 
She d. 1843. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child : 

1294. i. Maria Elizabeth Potter, b. 1842. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

12S0. iv. Albert E. Potter, son of Stephen L. and Sarah 
C. Morse, b. 1839, m. Mary Elizabeth Sumner, 1869. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

1295. i. Geo. Sumner Potter, b. 1870. 

1296. ii. Sarah Alice Potter, b. 1874. 



( 
AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 215 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1229. vi. John Child, sixth child and second son of Dea. 
Charles and Eliza May Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct.. 1789, 
rn. Sept. 11, 1831, Alice Manning Walker, dau. of Leonard and 
Chloe Child Walker of Stafford, Vt. Mrs. C. was b. in Staf- 
ford, Vt, Nov. 23, 1791. 

Mr. Child has been a successful farmer in this parish for 
many years — a citizen esteemed for his probity of character — of 
clear and discriminating judgment in all practical matters, 
whose influence has always been found on the side of right ; an 
early and persistent supporter of the temperance reform. His 
patriotism placed him in the foremost ranks of his country's 
helpers when threatened w 7 ith domestic invasion ; and without 
a murmur he surrendered to the uncertainties and dangers of 
warfare, the son on whom he was relying for support in his 
waning years. Ninety years of life have been given him, not 
in vain. 

Mrs. Child, inheriting the characteristics of parents remarka- 
ble for intellectual strength and physical vigor, to which are 
added excellent qualities of heart not less inherited, of pleasing 
and commanding personal appearance, lives in the midst of a 
large domestic circle, a central figure, surrounded by children 
and grandchildren, ministering in kind and motherly offices to 
all around her. Our recognition of her as a cheerful and effi- 
cient helper in our work, is noticed elsewhere. They reside in 
East Woodstock, Ct, — Mr. Child in his 91st year, and Mrs. 
Child in her 89th year. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1297. i. John Spencer Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. Sept. 30, 1833, m. 
1859, Lydia Lyon. 

1298. ii. Geo. Walker Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 1836, m. Dec. 
18, 1861, Martha Agnes Child, dau. of Erastus and Rhoda Ricard Child of 
Woodstock, Ct. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1297. i. John Spencer Child, eldest child of John and 
Alice Manning Walker Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 30, 
1833, m. 1858, Lydia Lyon. Mr. Child resides in Bockford, 
Iowa. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1299. i. Harris Manning Child, 1>. in Woodstock, Ct., June 24, 1859. 

1300. ii. Alice Sabra Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 15, 1861. 

1301. iii. Mary Lyon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. Jan. 19, 1864. 



216 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1302. iv. Anna Gertrude Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 22, 1867. 

1303. v. Leonard Walker Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 29, 1874. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1296. ii. George Walker Child, second child of John and 
Alice Manning Walker Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 18, 
1836, m. Dec. 18, 1861, Martha Agnes Child, dau. of Erastus 
and Rhoda Ricard Child of Woodstock, Ct. 

Capt. George W. Child had the honor of serving his country 
in the Union army in the late war of the rebellion. He raised 
a company of infantry in his native place, over which he was 
appointed captain. He was in several engagements and showed 
himself worthy of his honors. He came out unharmed and re- 
turned at the close of the war to his home and his farm, which 
he found quite as congenial as the strife of battles. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1304. i. John Erastus Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, July 5, 1868. 

1305. ii. Alice Rhoda Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 7, 1870. 

1306. iii. Agnes Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 11, 1874. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1230. vii. Charles Child, third son and seventh child of 
Dea. Charles and Elizabeth May Child of Woodstock, Ct., b. in 
Woodstock, Ct., 1791, m. March 20, 1817, Almira Holmes,, 
cousin of Oliver Wendell Holmes, the poet physician of Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Mr. Child was a thrifty and skillful farmer in East Wood- 
stock, Ct. In stature he was six feet, and of stalwart frame, 
with somewhat florid complexion ; a man of correct and sober 
habits. Like many of his kinsmen bearing the Child name, he 
was tenacious of his own opinions, acting from his own convic- 
tions rather than upon the opinions of others, a trait of charac- 
ter to be commended when based upon enlightened views ; 
never yielding a point to please one differing from him in opin- 
ions. Such an one must necessarily make his way through the 
world by warm encounters with opponents, but with the ap- 
proval of friends. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1307. i. Leonard Holmes Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, April 24, 1818, 
d. May 1, 1819. 

1308. ii. Abiel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 28, 1820, d. young. 

1309. iii. Sarah Temperance Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 8, 
1822, d. young. 



( 
• AND HIS DESCENDANTS. li 1 7 

1310. iv. Mart Elizabeth Child, b. in Woodstock, Cl . July 25, 1826, 
m. Fell. 25, 1851, John Bacon Healy, son of Jedediah and Abigail Bacon 
Healy of Brimfield, Mass. Mr. Eealy is a farmer. They have no children. 

1311. v. Sarah Lucinda Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 11. L829, 
m. Feb. 28, 1851, Amasa Child, son of Capt. Aaron Child of Woodstock, Ct. 
For children see No. 901. 

1312. vi. Hannah Almira Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 28, 1831, 
m. April 15, 1851, Edward Killam. 

13i:'>. vii. Emma Mahiah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 23. L833, 
in. Dec. is. 1867, Cm. Child Phillips. 

13U. viii. Susan Ellen Child. 1>. in Woodstock, Ct... April 4, 1836, 
unin. 

1315. ix. Annette Matilda Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 8, 1838, 
in. May 10, 1865, Samuel Gildersleeve, of New York City. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1312. vi. Hannah Almira Child, sixth child and fourth 

dau. of Charles and Almira Holmes Child, b. in Woodstock, 

Ct.. Feb. 2*. 1831. m, April 15, 1851, Edward Killam. Mrs. 

Killam died Dec. 10, 1872. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1316. i. Charles Henry Killam, b. March 19, 1852, in. March 19, 1878. 

1317. ii. Julia Elizabeth Killam, b. Dec. 26, 1854. unm. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1313. vii. Emma Mariah Child, seventh child and fifth 
dau. of Charles and Almira Holmes Child, b, in Woodstock, 
Ct, June 23, 1833, m. Dec. 18, 1867, by Rev. D. G. Ashley, 
George Child Phillips, son of Jeremiah and Zuriah Phillips, 
he was b. 1th April, 1836. Removed to West Woodstock, Jan., 

1873. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1318. i. George Child Phillips, Jr., b. March 15, 1873. 

1319. ii. Annette Zuriah Phillips, b. Feb. 15, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1315. ix. Axxette Matilda Child, seventh dau. and 
youngest child of Charles and Almira Holmes Child, b. in 
Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 8, 1S38, m. May 10, 1865, by Rev. S. 
Bourne, Samuel Gildersleeve of New York City. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gildersleeve are connected with the House of Refuge in New 
York City. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1320. i. Charles Child Gildersleeve, b. in Ndrthport, Long Island, 
N. Y., April 28, 1866. 

1321. ii. Susie Almira Gildersleeve. b. in Northport, Long Island, 
X. Y., March 36, 1869. 

P 



218 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1233. x. Elias Child, tenth child and fourth son of Dea. 
Charles and Eliza May Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 30, 
1797, m. April 19, 1827, Sophronia Meacham. She d. Jan. 31, 
1875. Mr. Child d. Oct. 20, 1879. 

Mr. Child was the successor of his father, Dea. Charles Child, 
to the ownership of the old homestead, the fourth generation 
from the original owner, Ephraim Child, who came from Rox- 
bury, Mass., to Woodstock about 1710. Mr. Elias Child be 
longed to the old school class of men, who feel that the former 
days are better than the present, and he was not easily drawn into 
any reforms or changes of the present day. He was a laborious 
and thrifty farmer when in his prime, and left a handsome pro- 
perty to his only child, John H. Child, who succeeds to the 
ownership of the old homestead, now in possession of the fifth 
generation from Ephraim Child, the first occupant. 
[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

1322. i. John Holbrook Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct , April 3, 1830, 
m. 1st, April 30, 1851. Julia Sanger. She d. Aug. 1879. He m. 2d, March 
29, 1880, Ruth Witter. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1323. i. Jennie E. Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct., 1860. m. Aug. 20, 
1879, Henry Pratt. 

1324. ii. John Frank Child, b. in East Woodstock, Ct., 1863. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1234. xi. Abiel Child, eleventh child and fifth son of Dea. 
Charles and Eliza May Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 6, 
1799, m. Feb. 18, 1826 or 1827, Henrietta Hale. He d. Julv 
4, 1859. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1325. i. Hannah Elizabeth Child, b. April 1, 1828, m. Jerome Pom- 
eroy. 

1326. ii. Charles Dickerman Child, b. June 29, 1830, m. 1st, Cornelia 
Munson, 2d, Emily Jones. 

1327. iii. Caleb Harris Child, b. May 25, 1834, m. May 22, 1861, Emily 
M. Robbins. 

1328. iv. Della H. Child, b. in Suffield, Ct , Oct. 26, 1848, m. Oct. 19, 
1869, Samuel T. Buel. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1325. i. Hannah Elizabeth Child, eldest child of Abiel 
and Henrietta Hale Child, b. April 1, 1828, m. June 2, 1852, 
Jerome Pomeroy. Residence, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



( 
AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 219 

[Eighth Generation . ] Children : 

1329. i. Henrietta Child Pomeroy, b. April 8, 1855. 

1330. ii. Henry Child Pomeroy, b. Nov. 8, 1859. 

1331. iii. John Miner Pomeroy, b. May 81, 1864. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1326. ii. Charles Dickerman Child, second child and 
eldest son of Abiel and Henrietta Hale Child, b. June 29, 1830, 
m. 1st, abt. 1854, Cornelia Munson, m. 2d, Jan. 1, 1868, Emily 
Jones of Wallingford, Vt, 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1329|. i. Mary Cornelia Child, b. in Wallingford, Vt., May 17, 1855. 

13304 ii. Charles Munson Child, b. in Wallingford, Vt., Nov. 17, 1856, 
d. 1857. 

133U. iii. Emeline Munson Child, b.in Wallingford, Vt., Sept. 13. 1859. 

1332. iv. William Day Child, b. in Wallingford, Vt., April 13, 1864. 

[Seventh Generation J 

1327. iii. Caleb Harris Child, third child and second son 
of Abiel and Henrietta Hale Child, b. May 25, 1834, m. May 
22, 1861, Emily M. Bobbins of Hartford, Ct. Mr. Child is 
descended from a vigorous and robust stock physically and 
mentally, is well developed, standing six feet, of good pro- 
portions, of florid complexion of regular and comely features, 
wears a countenance full of vitality, and vigor marks his move- 
ments. He is a prosperous jobber in dry goods at No. 87 
Worth St., New York City. 

The genealogy of Mrs. Child was written "by her little daugh- 
ter of twelve years, at my request, whose sweet little note it is 
our pleasure here to insert: 

New York City, Nov. 8, 1879. 
Dear Mr. Child:— 1 received your letter, and I am very sorry I have not 
answered it before. My great-grandmother's maiden name was Emily IIol- 
lister. She first married my great-grandfather, Mr. Strickland, and on his 
death, Mr. Savage. My grandmother's maiden name was Emily Malvina 
Strickland; she married my grandfather, Philemon P. Bobbins, who is still 
living. My mother's maiden name was Emily Malvina Robbins: she mar- 
ried my father, Harris Child, and my name is Emily Robbins Child. The 
last time we sat down at the same table together was at a Thanksgiving din- 
ner at Hartford, Ct., at my grandmother's, in 1873. My great-grandmother 
was hale and hearty as ever. She died in 1874, and my grandmother in 
1877. From your little friend, 

Emily R. Child, 

No. 50 East 68th St. 



220 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
1833. i. Infant, nnehristened. 

1334. ii. Emily Robbins Child, b. in Hartford, Ct., July 15, 1867. 

1335. iii. Caroline Adelaide Child, b. in New York City, June, 21, 1870 

1336. iv. Harris Robbins Child, b. in New York City, March 28, 1872. 

1337. v. Mary Hall Child, b. in New York City, Feb. 18, 1874. 
1338 vi. Louisa Robbins Child, b. in New York City, Jan. 21, 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1328. iv. Della H. Child, fourth child and second dan. of 
Abiel and Henrietta Hale Child, b. in Suffield, Ct,, Oct. 26, 
1848, rn. Oct. 19, 1869, Samuel T. Buel. Reside in Mechan- 
icsville, Cedar Co., Iowa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1339. i. Samuel Kenneth Buel, b. in Mechanicsville, Iowa, Nov. 16, 
1872. 

1340 ii. Son. unchristened b. July 10, 1879. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1215. iv. Capt. Elias Child, the fourth child of Capt. Elisha 
and Alice Manning Child, b. Dec. 28, 1755, m. 1st, March 18, 
1779, Dorothea Morse, b. July 24, 1760, dau. of Doct. Parker 
and Hannah Huse Morse. She d. 1786. He m. 2d, March 18, 
1790, Sophia Morse, dau. of Doct. David and Anna Newman 
Morse, a niece of his first wife. She d. Feb. 28, 1826. Those 
interested in the genealogy of the wives of Capt. Elias Child, will 
find it more fully treated in connection with David Morse, who 
married Hannah Child, (No. 906) dau. of Capt. Willard Child, 
on page 179, and in connection with No. 1480, where the marriage 
of Sarah Child to Jedediah Morse, Esq., first allies the two 
families afterwards so repeatedly linked. 

It may be noticed that military titles are often affixed to the 
names of men who lived in colonial times. The title meant 
something in that period — for those who bore it were in actual 
service, or in training as minute men, liable to be called to the 
field at any moment. They were patriotic men, ready to peril 
life and property in defence of American liberty. We are, 
therefore, particular to give the title as handed down to us in the 
record. Capt. Elias Child was the son of a man in whom the 
Colonial Government reposed confidence for his abilities and 
his devotion to the American cause. This son partook largely 
of his father's spirit and his ideas, and bore some of his 
father's honors. Less in public life than his father, because 



( 
AND EIS DESCENDANTS.. 22 L 

the fruits of the Revolution were being quietly enjoyed lie 
was content with less military honor, and more absorbed with 
civil pursuits. Capt. Elias Child ranked among the best of 
citizens, and was recognized by his neighbors as a man of 
sound and discriminating judgment, and upright in all his 
business transactions. He was known in his time as a pros- 
perous and wealthy farmer, a warm supporter of moral and re- 
ligious institutions, and was a consistent member of the Con- 
gregational Church. He died April 3, 1884. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children. By first wife — four children : 

1340^. i. Elisha Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Fob. 11, 1780, m. 1802. 
Nancy Child. 

1341. ii. Parker Morse Child, b. March 13, 1782. d. Aug. G, 1795. 

1342. iii. Charles Thompson Child, 1>. in North Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 

15, 1784, in. Jan. 21, 1808, Clarrissa Child. 

1343. iv. Elias Sewall Child, b. in North Woodstock, Ct., Mar. 2, 1786, 
d. Mar. 18, 1780. 

[By second marriage — four children.] 

1344. v. Elias Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 19, 1791, d. Feb. 15, 
1793 

1345. vi. Erastus Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 3, 1793. m. Feb. 24, 
1824, Rhoda Rieard. 

1340. vii. Dorothea Morse Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 2, 1797, m 
March 16, 1826, Abel Child. 

1347. viii. Sophia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 2, 1800, m. Feb. 

16, 1831, Abel Child. (See Abel Child's record— 780.) 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1310^. i. Elisha Child, eldest child of Capt. Elias and 
Dorothea Morse Child, b. Feb. 11, 1780, m. 1802, Nancy Child, 
eldest dau. and child of Capt. Willard and Lydia Morse Child, 
of North Woodstock. He d. Oct. 13, 1822. ' She d. March 25, 
1853, the widow of a second husband. 

As the accredited compiler of this genealogy it will not be 
deemed an offence against good taste, if in this connection I 
adopt the use of the first person while chronicling my father 
and family. In opening correspondence for this genealogy my 
name to many was unfamiliar ; by others, while familiar, it was 
not readily traced to its legitimate branch. It will possibly 
gratify an innocent curiosity if I introduce the reader to my 
immediate ancestor. 

My father Elisha Child, son of Capt. Elias Child, of North 
Woodstock, Ct., was among the early settlers (about 1805) in 



222 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

the town of Exeter, Otsego County, N. Y. My earliest recol- 
lections place me in a sparsely settled neighborhood composed 
mostly of New England people. The pioneers of the town 
were the Tunniclifs and the Herkimers ; soon after the Cush- 
mans, Williamses, Brookses, Curtisses and the Simmers ; then 
the Childes and the Morses. My father and my uncle, Charles 
Thompson Child, and David Morse, their brother-in-law, came 
very nearly together. These later pioneers were from Connect- 
icut. To them the school house and the house of worship 
were of the first importance. Thus early were laid the foun- 
dations of a moral and Christian community. These fathers 
and their children constituted a substantial society, observant 
of religious institutions, and zealous promoters of all enterprises 
that promised permanency and prosperity. My father was 
reared a farmer and continued to cultivate the soil during his 
life. In stature he was six feet high and well proportioned, of 
fine personal appearance and bearing, of sanguine tempera- 
ment, of a well balanced mind, of sound judgment, of good 
executive ability, of strict integrity, and a sincere Christian. 
He was a man of average intelligence for the times and was 
held in much esteem by his neighbors and acquaintances for 
his manly bearing and stability of character ; and was often the 
arbitrator in church and secular differences. His excellent 
musical abilities rendered his position in church affairs one of 
much importance. As my father passed away before I was of 
sufficient age to fully appreciate his characteristics, I write the 
account as given by those who were cotemporary with him, 
and some of whom were intimately associated with him in the 
affairs of life. It will not be out of place to mention a pleas- 
ing incident which occurred some few years since. On the oc- 
casion, I was brought into company with an intelligent and 
leading citizen of one of the towns adjoining my native town, 
(myself a stranger to him) who was an intimate associate of my 
father. Incidentally our family name was mentioned, but in 
no way to indicate that I bore the name. The gentleman re- 
marked that in earlier life (he was now quite aged) he had 
" had a very pleasant acquaintance with Elisha Child, of 
Exeter ; he was a superior man and one who was highly 
esteemed as a citizen." As the compliment was paid to the 
memory of my father, in ignorance of my relationship, I have 
ever cherished it with peculiar satisfaction. 



VXD HIS DESCENDANTS. '2'2S 

My mother, Nancy Child, was the eldest child of Capt. Wil- 
lard and Lvdia Morse Child. Her mother was the sister of 
Rev. Dr. Jedediah Morse, the great American Geographer, who 
was the father of Samuel F. B. Morse. LL. D., the inventor 
of the "Morse Telegraph." She was in stature somewhat 
above the average of her sex, of fair complexion and comely 
features. Her younger brother, the late Eev. Dr. Willard 
Child, once said to me. " your mother when a young lady was 
in my youthful eye the perfection of a beautiful girl." Her 
characteristics were such as might be looked for in a descend- 
ant of a good family of Puritan stock. She was marked with 
much strength of intellect ; her intelligent ideas upon matters 
of church and public interest are found in her diary, which for 
many years she was accustomed to keep. The religious ele- 
ment was prominent in her character. The education of her 
family in high, moral principles, with a view to meet the prac- 
tical duties of life, was to her a matter of first importance. 
Her children cherish her memory with warm affection, venera- 
tion and gratitude, for her tender and faithful devotion to their 
happiness and usefulness in life. Some years after my fathers 
death she married Dea. Dudley Child, of Bath, N. H. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1348. i. Parker Morse Child, b. in North Woodstock, Ct, March 27, 
1803, m. March 27, 1824. Sabrina Robinson. 

1349. ii. Harriet Child, b. in North Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 18, 1804, m. 
March 28, 1827, Lemuel Southard. 

1350. iii. Elias Child, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Sept. 3, 180(5, m. 
1st. Aug. 29, 1831, Melissa Hollister; m. 2d. May 14. 1833, Sylvina Thorp; 
m. 3d, Oct. 1G, 1867. Susan P. Cleaveland. 

1351. iv. Willard Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., April 17, 1808, m. Dec. 
31, 1833, Dorothea Child. 

1352. v. Charles Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., April 27, 1810, m. 1st, Oct. 
7. 1846, Diantha Cushman; m. 2d. July 3. 1866, M. Augusta Thorp. 

1853. vi. Elisha Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., June 14, 1812, in. Lucia 
Whitney. 

1354. vii. Nancy May Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., April 8, 1814, rn. 
May 16, 1833, Dwight P. Child. (For children, see record Dwight P. Child, 
of "Bath. N. II.) 

1355. viii. Hannah Child, b in Exeter, N. Y.. May 21, 1816, m. Nov. 17, 
1837. Bradlev Child. (For children, see record Bradley Child, of Bath, 
iV. If. 

1356. ix. William Graves Child, b. in Exeter. N. Y., June 23, 1818, in. 
Dec. 6. 1840, Jane Simpson. 

1357. x. Horatio Henry Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., July 16, 1820, m. 
1849, Betsey Brand. 



224 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS. 

1358. xi. Henrietta Amelia Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y.. May 28, 1823, 
youngest and posthumous; m. Geo. Minot, of Bath. X. H. They removed 
to Coventry, Vermont, where Mr. Minot died some years before his wife 
She died Xov. 20, 1856. They had no children. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1348. i. Parker Morse Child, eldest child of Elisha and 
Nancy (Child) Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct.. March 27, 1803, 
m. March 27, 1824, Sabrina Eobinson, of Exeter, N. Y.. dan. of 
Lemuel Eobinson, Sr., late of Barre, Mass. She was b. in Barre, 
Mass., July 15, 1805, d. Jan. 1, 18S0, in Utica, K Y., at the 
house of her son, Lucius C. Childs. Mr. P. M. Child d. Sept. 
10, 1837, in Exeter, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1359. i. Mary Axx Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y.. Feb. 4, 1825. m. Xov. 13, 
1844, Henry Hatch Curtiss. 

1360. ii. Lucius Curtiss Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y.. Xov. 24. 1831, m. 
Jan 13, 1853, Anna Jane Tapping. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1359. i. Mary Ann Child, eldest child of Parker Morse 
and Sabrina Eobinson Child, b. in Exeter. Otsego Co., IS". Y M 

7 7 ,_ 7 7 

Feb. 4, 1825, m. Nov. 13, 1844. Henry Hatch Curtiss, son of 
Abel Curtiss. an early settler in Otsego County, N. Y. Mr. 
Curtiss came to Utica nearly forty years ago, and established 
himself in the printing business, which he has successfully con- 
ducted till the present time, now the head of the firm of Curtiss 
& Childs. He is among the most respected citizens of the city. 
and has long been an esteemed and efficient elder in the West- 
minster Presbyterian church of Utica. He has been twice 
married. His first wife dying Aug. 6, 1849 : he m. 2d, Oct. 16, 
1850, Mary Burt Cooley, dau. of John and Sabra Cooley, of 
Longmeadow, Mass. She was b. Oct, 10, 1814. and d. March 

12, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1361. i. Mary Storrs Curtiss. b. in Utica. X. Y., March 1. 1845. Im- 
mediately upon her graduation from the High School of her native city, 
Miss Mary S. Curtiss began to teach in one of the public schools, and 
has made herself a most successful and esteemed instructor, bringing to her 
work a conscientious fidelity and thoroughness, carried often beyond her 
physical strength in her toils, by a sincere enthusiasm. 

1362. ii. Harriet Amanda Curtiss, b. in Utica, X. Y., Oct. 26, 1848. 

[By Mr. Curtiss' second marriage.] 

1363. iii. Clara Everts Curtiss, b. in Utica, X. Y.. Jan. 9, 1853. 




c 



Oc 



* 



<ZU/ 




/ ^U^^O 



I 
AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. 225 

I Kighth Generation.] 

1360. ii. Lucius Curtiss Childs,' second child of Parker 
Morse and Sabrina Robinson Child. b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., 
N. Y., Nov. 24. 1831, m. Jan. 13, 1853, Anna Jane Tapping, 
dau. of Isaac and Jane Tapping, of Utica, N. Y. Having 
acquired his trade, Mr. Chiids first established himself in busi- 
ness in Boonville, N. Y, becoming the editor and publisher of 
the Boonville Herald, a local paper in the interest of the old 
Whig party. After several years continuance in this connec- 
tion he disposed of his interests in Boonville, and established 
a business in Utica. Four years later he formed a partnership 
with his brother-in-law, Henry H. Curtiss, where they have 
built np and still conduct a prosperous business. Commenc- 
ing with but little capital, except a thorough knowledge of his 
trade, Mr. Childs has risen to the status of a successful and 
popular business man ; having the public confidence for his 
thoroughness and unswerving integrity. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1364. i. Charles Parker Childs, b. in Utica, N. Y., Oct. 10, 1854, d. July 30, 
1862. This child was much endeared to his parents by his precociousness and 
future promise, had he lived to mature manhood. At the tender age of 
eight years he gave pleasing proof of his ripeness for a higher and happier 
state of existence. 

1365. ii. Alice Jane Childs, 1). in Boonville, Oneida Co., N. Y., Aug. 20, 
1857. 

1366. iii. William Tapping Childs, b. in Utica, N. Y., July 1, 1862. 
1367 iv. Carrie Louisa Childs, b. in Utica, X Y., Dec. 17, 1867. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1349. ii. Harriet Child, second child of Elisha and Nancy 
(Child) Child, b. in North Woodstock, Ot, Nov. 18, 1804, m. 
March 28, 1827, Lemuel Southard, of West Fairlee, Vt. He 
d. 1876 or 1877. She d. March 29, 1S33. They had two 
children. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1368. i. Elias Child Southard, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., Aug. 10, 1828, d. 
Jan 31, 1850. 

1369. ii. Linus Southard, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., Jan. 24 1832, d. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1350. iii. Elias Child, third child and second son of Elisha 
and Nancy (Child) Child, was born in Exeter, Otsego Co., 

1 Mr. L. C. Childs adopted the terminal (s.) 



226 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

New York, on the 3d September, 1806. - Has been three times 
married, first marriage on the 29th August, 1831, by Rev. Dr. M. 
L. Perrine, Prof, of Auburn Seminary, to Melissa Hollister. 
Second marriage on the 11th of May, 1833, by the Rev. 
Chauncey Goodrich, to Sylvina Thorp. Third marriage by 
Rev. J. P. Cleaveland D. D., on the 16th October, 1867, to 
Susan P. Cleaveland. 

Mr. Child's first wife, Miss Hollister, was the daughter of 
Roswell and Esther Guernsey Hollister, of South Ballstonr 
Saratoga Co., N. Y. Possessed of an unusually attractive face, 
her large, soft, dark eye, and broad brow, betokened the sweet- 
ness of disposition, and strength of intellect, which especially 
characterized her. Even at the time of her marriage, her health 
was impaired by pulmonary difficulty, and her wedded life was 
very brief, after the birth of an infant, who did not survive 
her. Mrs. M. H. Child died in Tompkins, Delaware Co. , N. Y, 
on the 18th of July, 1832. ' Miss Thorp, the second wife, was 
the daughter of Edward and Sylvina Tremaine Thorp, of 
Butternuts, Otsego Co,. N. Y. Inheriting from her father a 
strong love for reading, and fine intellectual abilities, Miss 
Thorp had a highly cultivated mind, and entered upon the 
life of a clergyman's wife, with unusual qualifications to fill the 
position. Notwithstanding many cares and occupations, Mrs 
S. T. Child found always time for reading, indeed, she ever 
preferred a book or her pen to society, though possessed of 
rare conversational powers. Mrs. Child left in manuscript 
some fine products of her ready pen. Her death occurred in 
New York City, on the 5th of October, 1865. 2 

The third wife is the daughter of Rev. Dr. J. P. and S. H. 
D. Cleaveland. Dr. Cleaveland was a clergyman of the Pres- 
byterian church ; settled first in Salem, Essex Co., Mass., and 
from thence removed to Detroit, Michigan. While in Michi- 
gan he was connected as President with Marshall College, after- 
wards, we believe, merged with the University at Ann Arbor 
Later Dr. Cleaveland was settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Pro- 
vidence, R. I. At the time of the late war, Dr. C. became 
chaplain of a regiment of the Gulf Squadron. Dr. Cleaveland 

1 Further record of the Hollister family in the Appendix. 
2 Further notice of Mrs. Thorp Child's family is found in the appendix. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 227 

died at his home in Newburyport, Mass., on the 7th of March, 
1873. 

Mrs. S. P. Cleaveland Child was educated under the careful 
supervision of her father, and at the Ingham University at Le 
Roy, Genesee Co., N. Y., and at Andovcr, Mass., in the Abbott 
Female Seminary. Her signature has become familiar to many 
of the name, as the amenuensis of her husband in the prepara- 
tion of this genealog}^. 1 

"Mr. Elias Child was early consecrated by his parents in 
baptism, and as was so often the custom of New England fam- 
ilies, dedicated to the ministry should his spirit thus incline 
him with increasing years. With this in view, he was sent to 
fit for college at an academy in Stockbridge, Mass. Here he 
was encompassed with the best possible influences for mental 
and moral growth. Boarding in the family of the parents of 
Prof. Hopkins, his room-mate was the "Bob" Hopkins of boy- 
hood, who became in after years the honored Prof. Hopkins of 
Williams College. The society of this town was composed and 
controlled by the New England aristocracy of cultured refine- 
ment ; the influence of which was felt by young Child, and never 
forgotten. During this period of preparatory study, Mr. Child's 
father died, and henceforth he knew little of home. He enter- 
ed Union College, Schenectady, in 1824, graduating in 1828, 
under the presidency of Eliphalet Nott, D. D., and went soon 
to the Theological Seminary at Auburn, N. Y., where he studied 
with the Rev. Drs. Richards, Mills and Perrine, men eminent 
in their denomination. Mr. Child was settled in two parishes 
of his native state, from whence he removed to Michigan, being 
called to Albion, Calhoun Co. A very earnest and studious 
man, he devoted himself to his profession, and was considered 
a chaste and able sermonizer. Enthusiastic by nature, he be- 
came early in life the zealous friend of the slave, at a period 
when such friendship was not popular. A bronchial difficulty 
resulted in a withdrawal from the active service of the ministry. 
Business life has been intermitted by the superintendency of 
two charitable educational institutions, the only links to the 
early professional life, which his reverence for the office would 
permit. Excellent natural abilities are shrouded by an ex- 
tremely modest estimate of himself, arising in part from a proud 

1 In the appendix will also be found further notice of the Cleaveland family. 



228 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



sensitiveness of spirit, and the sketch so brief here given of 
him, would never have appeared in this genealogy of his com- 
piling, had not a friend who knew him well, offered to prepare 
a notice, due to him and his descendants." * 

[Eighth Generation.] Children. By first marriage : 

1370. i. Infant, unchristened, b. July 18, 1832, d. same day. 

[By second marriage :] 

1371. ii. Charles Henry Child, b. in TJnadilla, Otsego Co., N. Y., Aug. 
9, 1835, d. in Albion, Mich., March 16, 1841. 

1372. iii. Caroline Cleaveland Child, b. in Albion, Calhoun Co., Mich. ) 
Jan. 30, 1842. d. in Batavia, X. Y.. July 4, 1848. A sweet and lovely child 
of great promise. 

1373. iv. Charles Henry Child, 2d, b. in Clinton, Mich., March 21, 
1843, d. March 22, 1843. 

1374. v. Charles Henry Child, 3d, b. in Oaksville, Otsego Co., X. Y.. 
Aug. 24, 1844, m. July 28, 1876, Charlotte C. Leland. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1374;. v. Charles Henry Childs; 1 son of Elias and Sylvina 
Thorp Child, b. in Oaksville, Otsego Co., N.Y., Aug. 24, 1844, 
m. July 28, 1876, Charlotte, dan. of Henry and Elizabeth M. 
Conkling Calhoun,' 2 of New York City. Mr. Childs is agency 
clerk in the publishing house of Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Co., 
New York City, where he has been the last fifteen years. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1375. i. Cleaveland Childs. b. at Fort Lee, X. J.. Sept, 17, 1877. 

1376. ii. Ethel Thorpe Childs. b. in New York City, Jan. 5. 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1351. iv. Willard Child, fourth child and third son of 
Elisha and Nancy (Child) Child, b. in Exeter. Otsego Co., N.Y., 
April 17, 1808, m. Dec, 31, 1833, Dorothea Morse Child, dau. 
of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, of Exeter, 
N. Y. He was a farmer in the town of Bradford, Steuben Co., 
N.Y. ; and d. March, 1842. His widow m. Dea. Cyril Sumner, 
of East Pharsalia, N. Y., and both still survive. 
| Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1377. i. Edward Child, b. in Bradford, X. Y., Aug. 3, 1836, d. Sept. 12, 
1850, in Woodstock, Ct. 

1378. ii Clarissa Elizabeth Child, b. in Bradford, X. Y., Xov. 15, 1839. 

1379. iii. Loretta Fidelia Child, b. in Bradford, X. Y., Feb. 24, 1842, 

J C. H. C. adds the terminal " s " to his name. 
- See appendix for further account of the Calhoun family. 



i 
AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 229 

m. Sept. 26, 1860, Samuel Reed, of Oseo, Henry Co., 111. They had one 
child which died young. 

[Seventh Generation.! 

1352. v. Charles Child, 1 fifth child and fourth son of Blisha 

and Nancy (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y.. April 27, 1810, 
m. 1st, Oct. 7, 1846, Diantha Cushman. eldest child of David 
and Hetty Curtiss Cushman, of Exeter, N. Y. She was b. Nov. 
16, 1819, d. Aug. 18, 1861. He m. 2d, July 5, 1866. Mary 
Augusta Thorp, dau. of Hon. Henry and Mary Buckley Thorp, 
of Butternuts, N. Y. 

Passing the period of childhood and early youth with the 
ordinary educational advantages obtained in common schools 
of that period, Mr. Child commenced business as a clerk in a 
country store. After a term of service in this capacity, he pur- 
chased a part interest in a line of stages, with U. S mail con- 
tract. Later he became connected with a cotton manufactur- 
ing business in Oaksville, Otsego Co., N. Y. After several 
years in this connection, he disposed of his interest and turned 
his attention to farming, connecting it with the produce com- 
mission business. He has for thirty years been a resident of 
Oaksville, Otsego Co., N. Y. Possessing good business talents, 
he has shared the public confidence in the several official posi- 
tions, entrusted to him in town and county. He held for many 
successive years the office of post-master : for six years he was 
R. R. commissioner for the town of Otsego, N. Y. ; for several 
years one of the Directors of the Cooperstown and Susquehanna 
R. R., — and for many years he has been an officer of the Otsego 
County Agricultural Society. In all public interests relating 
to district, town and county affairs, he has always been a cheer- 
ful and liberal supporter. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children by 1st marriage: 
1379+. Infant son, unehristened. 

By second marriage: 
1380. i. Helen Augusta Child, b. in Oaksville, Otsego Co., N. Y., Feb. 
14, 1868. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1853. vi. Dea. Elisha Child, sixth child, add fourth son of 
ELisha and Nancy (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N.Y., 
June 14, 1812, m. March 4, 183!*, Lucia D. Whitney, dau. of 
Dea. Job and Nabby R. Whitney, of Woodstock, Ct. 
1 Mr. Charles Child adds the (s.) 



230 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Mr. Child early made bis home at North Woodstock, and in 
mature manhood settled on the farm where lie now resides. A 
staid and thoughtful man, his position has been an honorable 
and useful one in town and church affairs. The office of dea- 
con in the Congregational church in North Woodstock, he has 
for many years faithfully and acceptably maintained. His 
chosen life-long companion is among the best loved of her sex, 
for her many amiable and excellent personal qualities. Her 
musical endowments have enlarged the circle of her friends and 
made her for years an essential element in the choir of the Con- 
gregational church. The rare christian grace of loving devo- 
tion and self-sacrifice to aged parents and kinsfolk, illumined 
their later days and secured the gracious promise of the fifth 
Commandment. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1381. i. Nancy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 26, 1841, in. 1864, 
Daniel James Whitney. 

1382. li. Abbey E. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 17, 1843. m. Jan. 
1868, Ezra C. Child. (For children see No. 1471.) 

1383. iii. Ruth Knapp Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. March 1, 1849. 

1384. iv. Son — unchristened, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1851. 

1385. v. Henrietta Amelia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 26, 1856. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

1381. i. Nancy Child, eldest child of Deac. Elisha and 
Lucia D. Whitney Child, b. April 2(1, 1841, m. 1864, Daniel 
James Whitney. She d. Dec. 25, 1868. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child : 

1386. i. Nancy Whitney, b. in 1865. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1356. ix. William Graves Child, ninth child and sixth 
son of Elisha and Nancy (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, Otsego 
Co., N. Y., Jan. 23, 1818, m. Dec. 16, 1840, Jane M. Simpson, 
dau. of Eobert and Esther Simpson, of Belfast, Ireland. She 
wasb. Aug. 18, 1818. 

Mr. Child went to Woodstock in his early boyhood, where 
he has since resided. On reaching manhood, he established 
himself in business as a wheel-wright, but later as a farmer, an 
occupation better suited to his taste and genius. Interested 
and active in the material interests of parish and town, his in- 
fluence is salutary and efficient. Mrs. Child was a successful 
teacher before her marriage ; her untiring energy of character 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 231 

and earnest resolution to educate her children, has enabled her 
to triumph over delicate health and accomplish marvels. She 
justly draws from us our warmest esteem and gratitude lor her 
cheerful and indefatigable efforts to advance our work. Intel- 
ligent, thoughtful and energetic, she has been quick to compre- 
hend and supply needed information. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1387. i. Esther Simpson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. Jan. 25, 1842. With 
great energy and success has devoted herself to teaching. 

1388. ii. Mary Jane Child, b. Jan. 30, 1844, d. young. 

1389. iii. Cassius M. Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 13, 1845, m. Sept. 
14. 1873, Rachel P. Swisher. 

1390. iv. Sarah Pamelia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 4, 1851, m. 
May 30, 1879, Thomas Meek, cashier for Collins Axe Company, of East 
Douglass, Mass. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1389. iii. Cassius M. Child, third child and eldest son of 
Wm, Graves and Jane M. Simpson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
Sept. 13, 1845, m. Sept. 14, 1873, Rachel P. Swisher, of Row- 
];mdsville, Md. Mr. Child is a traveling agent for a mercantile 
house of Baltimore, Maryland, resides in Rowlandsville, Md. 
j Ninth Generation ] Children : 

1391. i. Phillips Jeremiah Child, b. in Rowlandsville, Md., Sept. 11, 
1874. 

1392. ii. Maud Maryland Child, b. in Rowlandsville, Md., Aug. 30, 1877. 

1393. iii. Frederick William Child, b. in Rowlandsville, Md., Sept. 27, 
1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1357. x. Horatio Henry Child, seventh son and tenth 
child of Elisha and Nancy (Child) Child, was b. in Exeter, 
Otsego Co.. N. Y., 16th of July, 1820, m. 7th of August, 1849, 
Betsey Brand, dau. of Samuel and Sally Brand, of Leonards- 
ville, Madison Co., K Y. She was born May 15th, 1822, in 
Leonardsville. 

Mr. Child had naturally a mechanical genius, and was engag- 
ed in the manufacture of agricultural implements. After sev- 
eral years of earnest application in this calling, failure of health 
necessitated a change ; when with characteristic enthusiasm, he 
established himself in the insurance business, in which he is now 
employed, in connection with a commission agency in produce. 
He is of sanguine temperament, of earnest purposes, fond of 
reading, interested in the passing events of the day, holds posi- 



232 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

tive and distinct opinions upon political and religious matters. 
He is esteemed as an honorable and worthy citizen of Leonards- 
ville, N. Y., his present residence. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1394. i. Arthur Child, b. in Leonardsville, N. Y., May 14, 1850. d. Aug. 
2, 1870. He was an amiable, bright and intelligent youth; in a course of 
education for the legal profession, when he was attacked with malignant 
fever, which in a few days terminated his life. 

1395. ii. Frank Samuel Child, b. in Leonardsville, N. Y., May 20, 1854. 

Rev. F. S. Child inherited a somewhat fragile constitution, with the gen- 
eral mental characteristics and tastes of his mother. Fond of his book from 
early childhood, the quietude resulting from not vigorous health, was hap- 
pily spent in reading. Every available book was devoured, and fortunately 
the love for a desirable class of literature was formed, leading to the decided 
penchant for belles-lettres which appeared in his student life. Mr. Child fit- 
ted for college at the Whitestown Seminary in Oneida Co.. N. Y.. where he 
graduated in 1871. He entered Hamilton College, Clinton, X.Y., graduat- 
ing in the class of '75, with a most honorable standing. He graduated from 
Union Theological Seminary in 1878. In January, 1879, Mr. Child was 
installed pastor of the Congregational church in Greenwich, Ct., his present 
charge. 



'& v 



[Sixth Generation.] 

1842. iii. Charles Thompson Child, third child and third 
son of Capt. Elias Child, b. in North Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 15, 
1784, m. Jan. 21, 1S08, Clarissa Child, second dan. of Capt. 
Willard Child, of North Woodstock, Ct. She d. in Exeter, 
N. Y., March 14, 1847, se 60 years. He d. in Exeter, N. Y., 
April 19, 1854, se 74. 

Soon after their marriage they removed from Woodstock to 
Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., and settled on a farm, where they 
spent the balance of their days, and where their children were 
born and reared to manhood and womanhood. Mr. Child was 
a man of a most kindly nature, of genial temperament, fond 
of his friends, of untiring industry, noted for his probity and 
conscientiousness in all his business transactions ; a supporter of 
all useful reforms, and a devout christian. With a life-long 
companion in full sympathy with him in domestic, social and 
religious life, the mother of thirteen children, twelve of whom 
grew up to manhood and womanhood under her sweet maternal 
influence, and settled in life. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1399. i. Ephraim Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Nov. 1, 1808, m. Nov. 25,. 
1830, Armenia Higgins. 



AXI> HIS DESCENDANTS. 233 

1400. ii. Elizabeth Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y., April 11, 1810, m. 1834, 
Harmon Edmunds. 

1401. iii. Marcus Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Dec. 16. 1811, m. 1st May, 
25, 1836. Elmira Eaton: m 2d, Cynthia Sillick. 

1402. iv. Dorothea Morse Child, b. in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., m. 1st, 
Dec. 31, 1833. Williard Child: m. 2d, Cyril Sumner. {For children, see 
Willard— 1351.) 

1403 v. Luther Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., July 19, 1815, m. Jan. 10, 
1841. Augusta Coates. 

1404. vi. Erastds Child. 1). in Exeter, X. Y., Oct, 4, 1817, m. April 29 t 
1846, Rachel Foster. 

1405. vii. Clarissa Pamelia Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Dec. 30, 1818,. 
m. Oct. 3. 1847. Chas. Hill. d. June, 29. 1853. Xo children. 

1400. viii. Fixley Breese Child, b in Exeter, X. Y., Jan. 22, 1821, m. 
1st, Feb. 15, 1848. Emeline Adkins: in. '2d. March G, 1851, Libbie Denton; 
m. 3d, June 18. 1876. Nancy M. Dixon. 

1407 ix. Charles Mason Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y., Xov. 1, 1822, m. 
March 6, 1851, Seba Ann Carr. 

1408. x. Hetty Curtis Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y., Dec. 5, 1824, d. Feb. 
2, 1826 

1409. xi. Aarox Putnam Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y., Jan. 25, 1827, m. 
Sept. 2, 1855, Emily L. Babcock. 

1410. xii. Fidelia Todd Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y., Xov. 11, 1828, m. 
Dec. 7. 1865, Lvman B. Ferris. 

1411. xiii. Floyd Cushmax Child, b. in Exeter, X. Y., Xov. 19, 1831, m. 
Feb. 24, 1869, Sarah Felton. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1399. i. Ephraim Child, first child of Charles Thompson 
and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., Nov. 1, 1808, 
in. Nov. 25, 1830, Armenia Higg'ms, dau. of Darius Higgins, 
of Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y. He d. Feb. 6, 1833, leaving two 
children. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1412. i. Celestia Esmixa Child, b. 20, 1831, m. Aug. 17, 1849, Ben- 
jamin Child, of Lenox, X. Y., They had three children, (See Benjamin 
Child, of Lenox. X. T.) 

1413. ii. Lucy Melissa Child, b. July 26, 1833, m. John Cancross; re- 
sides in Iowa. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1400. ii. Elizabeth Child, eldest daughter and second child 

of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exetei. 

Otsego Co., K Y, April 11, 1810, m. 1831, Harmon Edmunds, 

of Exeter, N". Y Mr. Edmunds is a hotel keeper, now in San- 

gerlield, N. Y. Has been sheriff of Otsego Co., N.Y.,'one term, 

and quite popular as a politician. 
R 



234: BENJAMIX CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children. 

1414. i. Leveret Edmunds, b. in Exeter, N. Y., July 4, 1836. m. Nov. 
11. 1856, Julia Hatch. 

1415. ii. Pitt Edmunds, b. Dec. 21, 1841, d. early. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1414:. i. Leveret Edmunds, son of Elizabeth Child and 

Harmon Edmunds, of Exeter, N. Y., b. July 4, 1836, m. Nov. 

11, 1856, Julia Hatch, dau. of widow Elizabeth Hatch, of 

Cooperstown, N. Y. Eesidence, Sangerfield, N. Y. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1416. i. Flora E. Edmunds, b. in Cooperstown, Otsego Co., N. Y., Aug. 
15, 1858, m. June 14, 1876, Frederick Terry. 

1417. ii. Eddie Edmunds, b. in Cooperstown, Otsego Co., N. Y., Dec. 23, 
1863. 

1418. iii. Lulu Maud Edmunds, ) b. Nov. 22, 1867, d. Oct 2, 1868. 

1419. iv. Lela May Edmunds, f Twin s, b NoT> ^ 1867; d Aug 3 186g 

1420. v. Lillian May Edmunds, b. in Cooperstown, Otsego Co., N. Y., 
Dec. 31, 1870. 

1421. vi. Hannah Edmunds, b. in Cooperstown, Otsego Co., N. Y., July 
11, 1873. 

[Ninth Generation ] 

1416. i. Flora E. Edmunds, eldest child of Leveret and 
Julia Hatch Edmunds, grand-daughter of Elizabeth Child Ed- 
munds, b. in Cooperstown, N. Y., Aug. 15, 1858, m. June 14, 
1876, Frederick Terry, son of Delos Terry, a wealthy farmer in 
the town of Sangerfield, Oneida Co., N. Y. 
[Tenth Generation.] Child: 

1422. i. Harriet Terry, b. in Sangerfield, N. Y., June 20, 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1401. iii. Marcus Child, third child, second son of Charles 
Thompson Child and Clarissa, his wife, b. in Exeter, N. Y., 
Dec. 16, 1811, m. 1st, Elmira Eaton, May 25, 1836 ; m. 2d, 
Cynthia Sillick, of Schenectady, N. Y. Settled in Saratoga, 
K Y., where he died in 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Child 
have one adopted daughter, Anna Child. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children. By first wife: 

1423. i. Eaton Child, b. Aug. 3, 1837, d. Feb. 16, 1857. 

1424. ii. Lawrence Allen Child, b. Feb. 3, 1848, d. Oct., 1848. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1403. v. Luther Child, third son, and fifth child of Charles 
Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, N. Y., July 
19, 1815, m. by Rev. Mr. Wall, Jan. 10, 1841, Angeline Coates 



I 

AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 235 

dau. of Bansome and Patience Coates, of Bradford, Steuben Co., 
N. Y. She was b. May 11, 1816, d. April 10, 1863. 

Mr. Child removed from Steuben Co., N.Y., in the year 1855, 
to the State of Michigan, and finally settled in Fowlersville 
Livingston Co., Mich., where he now resides, a thrift}' farmer. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1425. i. Amanda Jane Child, b. in Bradford, Steuben Co., N. Y., Dec. 6, 
1841, (1 June 25, 1869, unmarried. 

1426. ii. Fidelia Child, b. in Woodhull, Steuben Co., N. Y., April 27, 
1843, d. April 6, 1849. 

1427. iii. Ellen Child, b. in Bradford, N. Y., July 25, 1844, d. June 6, 
1849. 

1428. iv. Mary Child, 1). in Bradford, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1845, m. Feb. 10, 
1863, Nathaniel Brayton. 

1429. v. Marcus Child, b. in Bradford, N. Y., March 24, 1847, m. Nov. 

23, 1867, Adella Tanner. 

1430. vi. Patience Child, b. in Bradford, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1849, m. Jan. 

24, 1872, Myron Green. 

1431. vii. Loretta Child, b. in Bradford, N. Y., Feb. 14, 1852. 

1432. viii. Matilda Child, b. in Bradford, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1854. 

1433. ix. Frank Child, b. in Plymouth, Wayne Co., Mich., March 16, 
1858. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1128, iv. Mary Child, fourth dau. and child of Luther and 

Angeline Coates Child, b. in Bradford, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1845, 

m. Feb. 10 1863, in Howell, Livingston Co., Mich, Nathaniel 

Brayton, a miller by trade. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1434. i. Frank Brayton, b. in Howell, Mich., July 2, 1868. 

1435 ii. Leon Brayton, b. in Howell, Mich., March 1, 1871, d. young. 

1436. iii. Bertie Brayton, b. in Howell, Mich., July 8, 1873. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1429. v. Marcus Child, eldest son and fifth child of Luther 
and Angeline Coates Child, b. March 24, 1847, m. Nov. 21, 
1867, Adella Tanner, of Conway. Livingston Co., Mich. She 
d. Feb. 21, 1874. Mr. C. is a miller, a man of enterprise, and 
with his brother-indaw, Nathaniel Brayton is a mill builder in 
Kent Co., Mich. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1437. i. Lena Child, b. in Conway, Livingston, Co., Mich., Pee. 14, 1870. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1430. vi. Patience Child, fifth dau. and sixth child of 
Luther and Angeline Coates Child, b. Feb. 26. 184'.*, m. Jan. 24, 
1872, Myron Green, of Handy, Livingston Co., Mich. 



236 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1438. i. Angie Green, b. in Handy, Mich., Aug. 21, 1873. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1414. vi. Erastus Child, fourth son and sixth child of 
Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, 
Otsego Co., N. Y., Oct. 4, 1817, m. by Rev. Beriah Green, 
April 29, 1816, Rachel Foster, of Whitesboro. Oneida Co., K Y. 

Mr. Child evinced a love of boohs, and very early resolved 
on obtaining an education that should fit him for professional 
life. His mature youth was devoted to school teaching. Later, 
he entered Oneida Institute at Whitesboro, N. Y., where 
he continued for some years, acquiring a fair education, and 
graduated in 1841. He then pursued a course of theological 
studies under the late Rev. Beriah Green. He became thoroughly 
imbued with the views of his teacher on questions of slavery, 
then agitating the country, and identified himself with the party 
that held no church fellowship with slaveholders or their sympa- 
thizers. With characteristic earnestness and sincerity, he sought 
to bring public sentiment to his views. The success of the 
party was not great. Though licensed as a clergyman, his pub- 
lic services in his profession were brief. Failure of health made 
it necessary for him to seek other employment, and after a brief 
residence in Whitesboro, N. Y., in secular pursuits, he removed 
to Oneida, Knox County, 111., where he now resides, acting as 
reporter for a weekly paper in Galesburg, 111., and cultivating 
and adorning his beautiful home. His life has been marked 
with usefulness in the community where he resides ; and his 
upright and conscientious course has won the confidence and 
esteem of all who knew him. A christian mother's training in 
his childhood has largely shaped his moral feelings, and given 
him the deepest abhorance of immoralities of every kind. Not 
long since he wrote me that a profane word had never escaped 
his lips, that the remembrance of one rough word, not profane, 
to an elder sister, when a small boy, always gives him pain. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1439. i. Sarah Elizabeth Child, b. in Whitesboro, N. Y., May 14, 1849, 
m. Nov. 28, 1877, by Rev. A. W. Chamberlain, Fielding Bradford Webb, of 
Bedford, Taylor Co., Iowa. Mr. Webb was b. in Maqnoin, 111., April 30, 
1851; he is a miller, resides in Bedford, Taylor Co., Iowa. 

1440 ii. Charles T. Child, b. in Whitesboro, N Y., April 4, 1852, d. July 
1, 1854, by scalding. 

1441. iii Julia Irena Child, b. in Oneida, Knox Co., 111., May 30, 1869. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 237 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1406. viii. Finlet Breese Child, eighth child and fifth 
son of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exe- 
ter, Otsego Co., N. Y. } Jan. 22, 1821, m. 1st, Feb. 16, 1848, 
Emeline Adkins of Burlington, Otsego Co., N. Y. She d. April 
7, 1868; m. 2d, Libbie Denton. She d. Feb. 16, 1874; m. 3d, 
June 18, 1S76, Nancy Dixon, who was b. March 7, 1846, in 
Bloomington, Grant Co., 111. 

Passing his boj'hood, without special incident, except such as 
sometimes crops out in boys in whom is pent up an exuberant 
store of fun, in advancing years he showed courage and inde- 
pendence in grappling with the realities of life, and was not easily 
daunted by failures in his plans. He commenced life as a far- 
mer in Steuben County, N. Y. From thence he removed to 
Springville, Erie Co., N. Y., thence to Oneida, Knox Co., 111. 
Twelve years later, he removed to the town of Oak, Nuckolls 
Co., Nebraska, where, with grown up sons, he established his 
home for the balance of life. He possessed the essential ele- 
ments of a pioneer. He was energetic, persevering, self sacrific- 
ing, hopeful. He was a man of sterling integrity, and a useful 
man in society, often caring more for others than himself. His 
death occurred at his sister's, Mrs. Ferris, in Oneida, Knox Co., 
111., on the 2nd of July, 1880, of a pulmonary difficulty, which 
had long been undermining his once vigorous constitution. A 
portion of the last years of his life was spent as a colportuer and 
Sabbath school agent. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children. By first marriage : 

1442. i. Adelbert Child, b, July 11, 1850. 

1443. ii. Herbert Child, b. Sept. 19, 1853. 

[By third marrage:] 

1444. iii. Charles Tracy Child, b. May 30, 1877. 

1445. iv. Therox Floyd Child, b Sept. 17, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1407. ix. Charles Mason Child, ninth child and sixth son 
of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, 
Otsego Co., N. Y, Nov. 1, 1822, m. March 6, 1851, Seba Ann 
Carr. 

On attaining his majority, the California gold fever carried 
him across the plains and mountains to the gold mine?, where 
a few years of hard toil secured for him moderate gains, when 
he returned, married and commenced life as a miller in the 



238 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

village of Millville, Mass., his present residence. Industrious, 
conscientious and upright, he is esteemed as a worthy and use- 
ful citizen. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1446. i. Clarence Merriman Child, b. Feb. 18, 1853, d. Sept. 6, 1868, 
by accidental drowning in the mill pond. 

1447. ii. Horace Edward Child, b. Dec. 11, 1857, m. 1878, Harriet E- 
White. 

1448. iii. Geo. Mason Child, (adopted) b. Nov. 24, 1866. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1447. ii. Horace Edward Child, second child of Charles 
Mason and Seba Ann Carr Child, b. Dec. 11, 1857, m. 1878, 
Harriet E. White. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1449. i. Ada Bartlet Child, b. April 18, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1409. xi. Aaron Putnam Child, eleventh child and seventh 
son of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in 
Exeter, N. Y., Jan. 25, 1827, m. Sept. 2, 1855, Emily L. Bab- 
cock, dau. of Lester and Amelia Manning Babcock, of West- 
ford, Otsego Co., N. Y. She was b. May 16, 1831. 

Mr. Child was reared a farmer ; commenced active life as a 
teacher, in which capacity he was popular and successful. Soon 
after marrying he removed to the town of Oneida, Knox Co., 
111., and commenced farming. After a few years of success and 
accumulation, he removed to Creston, Iowa, where he now re 
sides. Here his occupation is farming in connection with the 
harness making business. He is energetic and sagacious and 
usually compasses his plans and is known as a successful busi- 
ness man. Inheriting the best instincts of a worthy ancestry, 
his aims are elevated and his practical bearing is beneficent and 
christian. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1450. i. Charles Lester Child, b. in Oneida, 111., Oct. 22, 1856, d. 
Sept. 12, 1875. 

1451. ii. Flora Elmira Child, b. in Oneida, 111., March 6, 1860. 

1452. iii. Kate Kent Child, b. in Oneida, 111., June 6, 1868. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1410. xii. Fidelia Todd Child, twelfth child and fifth dau. 
of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in Exeter, 
N. Y., Nov. 11, 1828, m. Dec. 7, 1865, Dea. Lyman B. Ferris, 



AMD HIS DESCENDANTS. 239 

a well-to-do farmer in Walnut Grove, Oneida, 111. He was 
b. in Huntington, 0., Feb. 16, 1820. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 
14.53. i. Mary Ferris, b. in Oneida, 111 , Feb. 17, 1868. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1411. xiii. Floyd Cushman Child, thirteenth child and 
eighth son of Charles Thompson and Clarissa (Child) Child, b. in 
Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., Nov. 19, 1831, m. Feb, 24, 1869, 
Sarah Felton, of Marlboro, Mass. She was b. Sept. 3, 1842. 

Mr. Child was the Benjamin of the family. For several years 
he staid on the homestead, caring for aged parents and a widow- 
ed sister with two young daughters. When the rebellion^broke 
out he was drafted into the U. S. service. The alternative was 
before him, to obey the summons in person or procure a substi- 
tute. His duties under the paternal roof seemed imperative ; 
hence he procured a substitute. His parents passing away, and 
his sister remarrying, he removed to Iowa and settled in Cres- 
ton, his present home. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 
1454. i. Etta Child, b. May 22, 1870. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1345. vi. Erastus Child, sixth child of Capt Elias and 
Sophia Morse Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept, 3, 1793, m. 
Feb. 24, 1824, Ehoda M. Rickard. She was b. in Dudley, Mass., 
Feb. 1, 1801. He d. Aug. 13, 1853. Mrs. Child lives in North 
Woodstock, Ct. 

Mr. Child was a farmer and the possessor of the old home- 
stead of his father; and ranked among the intelligent and 
worthy citizens of the town ; a man of sound and discrimina- 
ting judgment, a nice sense of right and of strict probity. 
As a neighbor, he was kind and obliging, genial and happy in 
his domestic relations ; his home was ever open for cheerful 
hospitality. An under current of humor was a characteristic 
which frequently cropped out, as well in his family as among 
his neighbors. Mrs. Child did not always escape his facetious 
bantering. Her good humour, however, was equal to her hus- 
band's, and her wit was always at her command, when needed 
to parry a joke. A standing panacea was " Erastus, the onty 
evidence of superior judgment in the Child family I ever saw, 
was that exhibited in the choice of their wives." But the milk 



240 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

of human kindness flowed perpetually through their kindly 
natures, and domestic happiness was uninterrupted through a 
long life. Mrs. Child was of French descent. Her ancestors 
may have been of those Huguenot Eefugees who found an 
asylum from persecution in the New World. She possesses 
that sparkling, piquant vivacity characteristic of that nation ; 
thoroughly lovable and domestic in her character, genial, affa- 
ble and courteous, she is a universal favorite in the neighbor- 
hood and circle of her acquaintance, and withal a sincere christ- 
ian woman. 
[Seventh Generation.! Children: 

1455 # i. Newman Gerrish Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Sept. 10 1825 
d. Sept. 1, 1826. 

1456. ii. Peter Hamilton Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 6, 1827, 
m. Jan. 5. 1865, Mary Ann Stetson. 

1457. iii. Martha Agnes Child, b. Oct. 19, 1840, m. Dec. 1861. Geo. 
Walker Child. {For children, seepage 216, No. 1298.) 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1456. ii. Peter Hamilton Child, second son and second 
child of Erastus and Ehoda Rickard Child, b. January 6, 1827, 
m. Jan. 5, 1865, Mary Ann Stetson, of Woodstock, Ct. Mr. 
Child succeeded to the homestead of his father, where he died, 
July 1 1, 1872. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1458. i. Mary Agnes Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 1, 1866. 

1459. ii. Abbie Rickard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 21, 1868, d. 
Oct. 22, 1879. 

1460. iii. Henry Hamilton Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 21, 1872- 
[For Nos. ix. and xi. Children of Capt. Elisha Child, see the Walker 

branch at the end of chapter HI.] 

[Fourth Generation.] 

35. ix. Peter Child, ninth child and fifth son of Ephraim 
and Priscilla Harris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. July 6, 1727, 
m. Dec. 30, 1756, Susanna Child, dau. of Nathaniel Child, who 
was probably one of the eldest sons of John and Elizabeth 
Child. Peter Child d. in 1810, se. 83. She died Aug. 12, 1806. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1461. i. Chester Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 7, 1757, m. Feb. 11, 
1790, Sarah May. 

1462. ii. Ezra Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 1, 1759, m. March 20, 
1783, Hannah Child, b. July 14. 1762, dau. of Richard Child, and sister of 
Capt. John and Dea. Dudley Child, of Bath, N. H. Mr. Child was one of 
the pioneer settlers of the town of Bath. A man of good intellectual abilities 
and generally well informed ; was a man of a good deal of prominence, and 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 241 

a useful member of society; dateof his death or wife's death not ascertained. 
They died childless. 

14G3. iii Winsi.ow Child, b. in Woodstock, Oct. 7, 1763, d. Dec. 30, 
1765. 

1464. iv. Joanna Child, b in Woodstock, June 16, 1765. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1461. i. Col. Chester Child, eldest child of Peter and Sus- 
anna (Child) Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 7, 1757, m. Feb. 
11, 1790, Sarah May, dau. of Sarah Child and Stephen May. 

He d. April, 12, 1S23. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children : > 

1465, i. Pamelia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dee. 9, 1790, m. July 25' 
1816, Dea. Luther Child, son of Capt. Willard Child. She d. April 15, 1851 
(For children, see page 188, No. 993.) 

1406. ii. Ezra Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Sept. 6, 1792, m. March 25, 
1820, Betsey May. dau. of Caleb May. He d. Nov. 17, 1860, se. 68. They 
had no children. 

Mr. Child was one of the prominent business men of the town; of much 
energy of character, self-reliant, and of positive opinions: was usually suc- 
. essful in carrying out his purposes. A worthy citizen, and for many years 
a justice of the peace. He enjoyed the esteem of his fellow townsmen. 

1467. iii. Scsan Child, b. June 7. 1796, m. May 20, 1828, Spencer Child, 
son of Alpha and Mary May Child. He d. in Woodstock, July 25. 1832. 
She d. 1870. in Woodstock. No children. 

1468. iv. Mary Ann Child, b. Aug. 27, 1798, d. July 15, 1823. 

1469. v. Chester Child. Jr.. b. June 24. 1802, m. Feb. 24, 1831, Pru- 
dence Carpenter. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1469. v. Dea. Chester Child, second son and youngest 
child of Col. Chester Child, m. Feb. 24, 1831, Prudence Car- 
penter, dau. of Cyril Carpenter, of Woodstock. Ct. He was a 
man much esteemed in the community for his excellent quali- 
ties. Twenty-one years he held the office of Deacon, in the 
Congregational church : and was prominent in town affairs. 
He lived on the homestead of his father and grandfather in that 
part of the town of Woodstock, known as the English neighbor- 
hood. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1470. i. Chester Edward Child, b. Oct. 13, 1836. He served in the 
Union Army in the war of the Rebellion of 1861-65. in the 26th Connecti- 
cut Regt. of Infantry, under Capt. Geo. Walker Child. He d. Aug. 10, 
1863, of disease contracted in the army. 

1471. ii. Ezra Carpenter Child, b. April 15, 1841, m. Jan. 1, 1868, 
Abbie E. Child. 

1472. iii. Abbie Prudence Child, b. April 21, 1843, m. Feb. 6, 1873, 
Merrick Paine. 



242 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1473. iv. Brainard Winslow Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct„ Aug. 29' 
1846. He served in the Union Army in the war of the Rebellion. Resides 
in the West. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1471. ii. Ezra Carpenter Child, second child and second 
son of Dea. Chester and Prudence Carpenter Child, b. in Wood- 
stock, Ct., April 15, 1841, in. Jan. 1, 1868, AbbieE. Child, dau. 
of Dea. Elisha and Lucia Whitney Child. He d. May 13, 1876. 

Mr. Child was justly held in high esteem by his fellow towns- 
men. At his death he had served three years on the board of 
the selectmen of the town of Woodstock. For a number of 
years he was the efficient superintendent of the Sabbath school 
in the congregation of which he was an active member, and but 
a short time before his death he" was elected deacon of the 
church. The elements of an influential man were largely 
developed. His companion, not less esteemed, was in full sym- 
pathy with her husband in all that pertained to home and 
society. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children. 

1474. i. Lizzie Carpenter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 23, 1870. 

1475. ii. Chester Elisha Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 1, 1872. 

1476. iii. Grace Annie Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 6, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1472. iii. Abbie Prudence Child, third child and only dau. 
of Dea. Chester and Prudence Carpenter Child, b. in Woodstock r 
Ct., April 21, 1843, m. Feb. 6, 1873, Merrick Paine, son of 
John Paine, of East Woodstock, Ct. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1477. i. Robert Paine, b. Dec. 13, 1874. 

1478. ii. John Brainard Paine, b. Feb. 6, 1877, d. Oct. 8, 1877. 



( 

AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 242 



CHAPTER III. 

[Third Generation.] 

16. ii. Capt. Benjamin Child, second child and second 
son of Benjamin and Grace Morris Child, b. in Koxbury, Mass., 
July 19, 1685, m. Sept. 1712, Patience Thayer, of Mendon, 
Mass. Thej' removed soon after to Woodstock, Ct., then called 
"New Koxbury." "They joined the church in Woodstock in 
1710; Patience joined by letter." She d. March 15, 1764. 
[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

1479. i. Benjamin Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass,, Aug. 28, 1713, ra. 
Patience , 1740. 

1480. ii. Grace Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 22, 1716, m. 1737, 
Moses Lyon. 

1481. iii. Nathaniel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 13, 1717, ra- 
1st, April 3, 1747, Jemima Bugbee; m. 2d, Sept. 19, 1776, Mrs. Eleanor Fox. 

1482. iv. Elijah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 5, 1719, d. Sept. 5, 
1736. 

1483. v. Patience Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 22, 1721, pub. Oct. 
18, 1746, with Joseph Wild, of Boston, Mass. 

1484. vi. Sarah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 19, 1722, m. Feb. 19, 
1746, Dea. Jedediah Morse. 

1485. vii. Moses Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 27, 1725, m. June 24, 
1752, Mary Payson. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1479. i. Benjamin Child, Jr., eldest child of Capt. Ben- 
jamin and Patience Thayer Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 

28, 1713, m. about 1740, Patience . 

[Fifth Generation.] Children : 

1486. i. Chloe Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 9, 1741, m. Oct. 3, 
1764. Luther Cady. 

1487. ii. Sarah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 20, 1742, d. early. 

1488. iii. Elijah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 3, 1744, m. Hannah 
Harris. 

1489. iv. Phineas Child, bapt. Sept. 21, 1746, m. . 

1490. v. Mary Child, bapt. Jan. 22, 1748, m. April 9, 1767, Parker Bacon. 

1491. vi. Levina Child, b. Jan. 24, 1851, m. March 10, 1774, Eleazer 
Jackson. 

1492. vii. Sarah Child, 2d, b. Jan. 16, 1753. 

1493. viii. Cephas Child, b. Sept. 7, 1755, m. Feb. 18, 1782, Martha Child. 

1494. ix. Zillah Child, b. Aug. 27, 1757. 

1495. x. Lyman Child, b. Oct. 29, 1759, m. . 

1496. xi. Freeman Child, b. Nov. 16, 1762. All the children of Benjamin 
and Patience were born in Woodstock, Ct. 



244 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBUEY, MASS. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1488. iii. Elijah Child, third child and eldest son of Ben- 
jamin, Jr., and Patience Child, bapt. in Woodstock, Ct., 

Dec. 3, 1744, ra. Hannah Harris, dau. of Timothy and Elizabeth 
Stevens Harris, of Brookline, Ct. She was b. Aug. 14, 1754, 
d. June 5, 1808. He d. July 14, 1825. 
[Sixth Generation.] Child: 

1497. i. Timothy Harris Child, b. Feb. 14, 1784, d. July 19, 1856, unm. 
[Fifth Generation.] 

1493. viii. Cephas Child, third son and eighth child of 
Benjamin, Jr., and Patience Child, was b. Sept. 7, 1756, in 
Connecticut. He Math a brother, Lyman Child, removed to 
Vermont at an early period of their lives. Mr. Lyman Child 
settling in Hartford, Vt., while Mr. Cephas Child made his 
home in West Fairlee, Orange Co., Vt, where he married on 
the 18th of February, 1782, Martha Child. Mrs. Martha Child 
died in West Fairlee, Vt, on the 6th of February, 1795. After 
her decease, Mr. Child resided in the family of his daughter, 
Mrs. Moses Chamberlain, in Bradford, Vt, until his own death, 
which occurred the 30th of April, 1S36. Mr. Child was a 
Eevolutionary soldier, and in his later years drew a pension for 
his services. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1498. i. Nancy Child, b. June 15, 1784, in West Fairlee, Vt., ra. Thule 
Williard, of Hartland, Vt. She died there June 26, 1838. Left no children. 

1499. ii. Martha Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt., 1786, ra. Jan. 1806, 
Capt. Moses Chamberlain. 

1500. iii. Sally Child, b. Sept. 7, 1788, m. Andrew Luce. 1 

1501. iv. Mary Child, b. Nov. 20, 1793, m. Feb. 20, 1814, Col. Moody 
Chamberlain. 

1502. v. Benjamin Child, b. March 30, 1794, d. May 30, 1813, in the army. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

1499. ii. Martha Child, second dau. and third child of 
Cephas and Martha (Child) Child, was b. in West Fairlee, Vt, 
in 1786, m. Capt. Moses Chamberlain, January, 1806. Ee- 
sided in Bradford, Vt. Capt. Moses Chamberlain and his 
brother, Col. Moody Chamberlain, who married Mary Child, 
the fourth daughter of Cephas Child, were sons of Col. Eem- 
embrance Chamberlain, an early emigrant from Connecticut to 
Vermont ; himself the son of Dea. Moses and Jemima Wright 
Chamberlain, of Connecticut. " There's many a true word 

1 Record of this family will be found in the appendix if obtained. 



i 
AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 245 

spoken in jest," is a proverb finding such fulfillment in the life 
of Col. Kemembrance Chamberlain, we believe others beside 
the family will be interested in its relation. Coming to New- 
bury, Vt., in 1770, he settled in the southern part of that town, 
and boarded with a Mr. Johnson, who used to ask him, in a 
joking way, why he did not marry. In like spirit, he would 
reply, '" I am waiting for your widow." 1775, Mr. Johnson 
died. Threatened by an invasion of Tories and Indians from 
Canada, Mrs. Johnson took her three sons, the youngest an in- 
fant of months, upon a horse with her, and rode to Chester, 
New Hampshire, to the home of her parents. The next 
year she returned to Newbuiy, and became the wife of Col. 
Remembrance Chamberlain, and the mother of eight Chamber- 
lain children. That blessings should attend this line, we- can 
but believe, so thoroughly have they obeyed the command to 
"Honor father and mother." We find Col. R Chamberlain 
brought to Vermont his parents and in his large household, they 
held honored and honorable positions, until called to their 
heavenly home. The same chivalric courtesies were extend- 
ed to Mr. Cephas Child by his son-in-law, Capt. Moses Cham- 
berlain. Capt. Chamberlain died in Bradford. Vt., in Novem- 
ber, 1854, aged 77 years. Mrs. Martha Child Chamberlain, 
his wife, having died some fifteen years before, on the 25th of 
November, 1839. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1503. i. John E. Chamberlain, b. Nov. 4. 1806, m. March, 1831, Laura 
Willard. 

1504. ii. Cephas Child Chamberlain, b. Jan. 28, 1809, m. Alice Mallen. 

1505. iii. Martha C. Chamberlain, b. April 10, 1811, in. Oct. 1839, John 
G. Cross. Mrs Cross died on January 30, 1843. 

1506. iv. Mart C. Chamberlain, b. Aug. 9, 1813, ra. March 9. 1837, Ben- 
jamin Chamberlain. 

1507. v. Moses R. Chamberlain, b. April 28, 1816. m. Sept. 25, 1819, 
Ruby S. Johnson. 

1508. vi. Elizabeth A. Chamberlain, b. Aug. 1, 1818. d. March. 20, 1821. 

1509. vii. Benjamin F. Chamberlain, b. Dec. 21, 1821, d. April 2, 1845. 

1510. viii. Elizabeth E. Chamberlain, b. Aug. 16, 1823, m. March 26, 
1855, Jared M, Hazeltine. 

1511. ix. Amanda N. Chamberlain, b. May 22, 1826, m. May 23, 1849, 
Henry E. Sawyer. 

1512. x. Azuba A. W. Chamberlain, b. Sept. 2, 1831, m. Oct. 20, 1853, 
Luther S. Grover. 



246 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1503, i. John E. Chamberlain, eldest son and child of 
Martha Child and Capt. Moses Chamberlain, b. in Bradford, 
Vt, 4th November, 1806, m. March, 1831, Laura Willard. 
Eesidence, Newbury, Vt. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1513. i. George W. Chamberlain, b. March 9, 1832, m. Mrs. Eliza Har- 
rison. 

1514. ii. Horace E. Chamberlain, b. Nov. 30, 1834. 

1515. iii Remembrance W. Chamberlain, b. March 31, 1837, m. Helen 
Corliss. Two children. 

1516. iv. Laura Evaltn Chamberlain, b. April 9, 1842, in. John W. 
Currier, of West Troy, Vt. 

1517. v. Ellen A. Chamberlain, b. Aug. 1, 1845, m. George B. Harri- 
man, of Bradford, Vt. 

1518. vi. Charles W. Chamberlain, b. Nov. 4, 1849. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1504. ii. Cephas Child Chamberlain, second son and 
child of Martha Child and Capt. Moses Chamberlain, b. in Brad- 
ford, Vt, 28th January, 1809, m. abt. 1835, Alice Mallen, of 
Boston, Mass., where they resided until Mr. Chamberlain's 
death, in that city, on the 1st of February, 1876. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1519. i. Alfred W. Chamberlain, b. in Boston, Mass. 

1520 ii Susan E Chamberlain, b. Sept. 23, 1840, in Boston, Mass,, m. 

a, Mr. Bartlett, of same city. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1506. iv. Mary Child Chamberlain, second dau. and 
fourth child of Martha Child and Capt. Moses Chamberlain, 

b. in Bradford, Vt., 9th August, 1813, m. 9th March, 1837, 
Benjamin Chamberlain. Eesidence, Bradford, Vt. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1521. i. Ellen A. Chamberlain, b. Sept. 8, 1838, in. Sept. 26, 1860, Nel- 
son ft. Doe. 

1522. ii. Martha A. Chamberlain, b. Dec. 29. 1840, m. Nov. 21, 1866, 
Benjamin F. Pillsbury. 

1523 iii. George Z. Chamberlain, b. Feb. 28, 1843, d. April 1, 1844. 

1524. iv. Benjamin F. Chamberlain, b. July 30, 1845. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

1521. i. Ellen A. Chamberlain, eldest dau. and child of 
Mary Child Chamberlain and Benjamin F. Chamberlain, b. 8th 
of September, 1838, m. 26th September, 18t>0, Nelson E. Doe. 
[Ninth Generation] Children : 

1525. i. Fred E. Doe, b. Sept. 29, 1863. 

1526. ii. Lonison Wesley Doe, b. July 10, 1865. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 247 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1522. ii. Martha A. Chamberlain, second dau. and child 
of Mary Child Chamberlain and Benjamin V. Chamberlain, 
b. Dee. 29th, 1840, m. 21st November, 1866, Benjamin T. Pills- 
bury. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

1527. i. Alice Z. Pillsburv. b. Jan. 12, 1868. 

1528. ii. Mary Child Pillsburv, b. Aug. 12. 1871. 

{Seventh Generation.] 

1507. v. Moses R Chamberlain, third son and fifth child 
of Martha Child and Capt. Moses Chamberlain, b. in Bradford. 
Orange Co.. Vt, 28th April, 1816. m. 25th September, 1841. 
Ruby S. Johnson. Mr. Chamberlain is a farmer, of the ener 
getic, progressive order, seeking to improve and elevate this 
most noble calling. Is an extensive dealer in fine stock : in 
swine, sheep and cattle. He resides upon the homestead of his 
grandfather. Col. Kemembrance Chamberlain. 
{Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1529. i. Martha E. Chamberlain, b. Oct. 7, 1842, d. May 13, 1845. 

. 1530. ii. Frank R. Chamberlain, b. May 15, 1844, m. Feb. 9, 1868, Abbie 
F. Manser. 

1531. iii. Martha E. Chamberlain, 2d, b. July 26, 1847, unm. 

1532. iv. John W. Chamberlain, b. Dec. 5, 1848, d. May 25, 1864. 

1533. v. Ruby J. Chamberlain, b. Not. 16, 1856, unm. 

{Eighth Generation.] 

1530. ii. Frank R Chamberlain, eldest son and second 
child of Moses R and Rubv S. Johnson Chamberlain, and errand- 
son of Martha Child Chamberlain, was born on the ancestral 
farm Bradford, Vt, 15th May, 1844. married 9th February, 
1868, Abbie F. Manser. Mr. Chamberlain is associated with 
his father in the culture of the old home estate, and in the rear- 
ing of blooded stock, at Bradford. Vt. 
Ninth Generation.] Children : 

1534. i. John W. Chamberlain, b. Sept. 18, 1870. 

1535. ii. Gertie M. Chamberlain, b. March 21. 1876. 

1536. iii. Sarah S. Chamberlain, b. Aug. 29, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1510. viii. Elizabeth E. Chamberlain, fourth dau. and 
eighth child of Martha Child and Capt. Moses Chamberlain, 
b. in Bradford, Vt., 16th August, 1823, m. 26th March. 1855, 
Jared M. Hazeltine. Reside in Janes ville, Wis. 



248 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1537. i. Charles H. Hazeltine, b. Jan. 1856, in Janesville, Wis. 

1538. ii. Hyatt Smith Hazeltine, b. Jan. 1857, in Janesville, Wis. 

1539. iii. Franklin C. Hazeltine, b. March 17, 1864, in Janesville, Wis. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1511. ix. Amanda N. Chamberlain, fifth dau. and ninth 
child of Martha Child and Capt Moses Chamberlain, b. in Brad- 
ford, Vt, 22d May, 1826, m. May 23d, 1849, Henry E. Sawyer. 
Residence, Chicago, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

1540. i. Harry C. Sawyer, b. Nov. 21. 1854, in Janesville, Wis. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1512. x. Azuba A. W. Chamberlain, eighth dau. and 
tenth child of Martha Child and Capt. Moses Chamberlain, b. 
in Bradford, Vt, September 2d, 1831, m. Oct. 20th, 1853, 
Luther S. Grover. Residence, White River Junction, Vt. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1541. i Edward Maitland Grover, b. Aug. 26, 1854, in Burlington, 
Vt., m, Miss Clark. Resides in Boston, Mass. ; one child. 

1542. ii. Charles F. Grover, b. Dee. 13, 1858, in Lebanon, N. H., unm 

1543. iii. Mary E. Grover, b. June 2, 1863. 

1544. iv. George B. Grover, b. July 9, 1869. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1501. iv. Mary Child, fourth child and dau. of Cephas and 
Martha Child, b. in West Fairlee, Vt, 20th November, 1793, m. 
20th February, 1814, Col. Moody Chamberlain, of Newbury, 
Vt. Mrs. Mary Child Chamberlain died 8th August, 1838. 
Col. Chamberlain died at Newbury, Vt, July 24, 18f>3. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1545. i. Johnson Chamberlain, b. Nov. 16, 1814, m. Oct, 12, 1838, Olive 
Ann Hazeltine. 

1546. ii. Harriet Chamberlain, b. July 19. 1816, m. May 18. 1836, 
James M. Chadwick. 

1547. iii. Moody Chamberlain, Jr., b. Nov. 28, 1818. 

1548. iv. Ezra B. Chamberlain, b. May 9, 1821. d. young. 

1549. v. Elizabeth E. Chamberlain, b. March 9, 1823, m. July 11, 1850, 
William B. Hibbard. 

1550. vi. Ezra B Chamberlain, 2d, b. June 14, 1825, m. Nov. 25, 1852, 
Elizabeth H. Bayley. 

1551. vii. Emeline B. Chamberlain, b. Feb. 4, 1828, m. Nov. 25, 1852, 
Harry Pox. 

1552. viii. Mary Child Chamberlain, b. Sept. 21, 1830. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1545. i. Johnson Chamberlain, eldest son and child of 
Mary Child and Col. Mood}^ Chamberlain, b. in Newbury, Vt, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 249 

16th November, 1814, m. 12th October, 1838, Olive Ann 
Hazeltine. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1553. i. Charles Chamberlain, b. July 14, 1840, d. young. 

1554. ii. Wright Chamberlain, b. Aug. 27, 1843, m. Nov. 36, 1868, Abbie 
F. Smith. 

1555. iii. Francis Chamberlain, b. Feb. 4, 1845. 

1556. iv. Charles Chamberlain, 2d, b. Jan. 13, 1849. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1554. ii. Wright Chamberlain, second son and child of 
Johnson and Olive A. Hazeltine Chamberlain, and grandson of 
Mary Child Chamberlain, b. 27th August, 1843, m. 25th Nov- 
ember, 1S68, Abbie F. Smith, dau. of Charles E. and Susan 
Smith, of Corinth, Yt. Besides in Lancaster, Coos Co., New 

Hampshire. 

[Eighth Generation ] Children: 

1557. i. Amelia K. Chamberlain, ) T • ( b. Aug. 27, 1869, Amelia d- 

1558. ii. Alice S. Chamberlain. \ ±wm - } Mar. 10, 1878. 

1559. iii. Susie O. Chamberlain, b. Jan. 28, 1871, d. Feb. 18, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1546. ii. Harriet Chamberlain, eldest dau. and second 
child of Mary Child and Col. Moody Chamberlain b. in New- 
bury. Vt, 19th, July, 1816, m. 18th May 1836, James M. Chad- 
wick. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

1560. i. Ellen F. Chadwick, b. June 11, 1839. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1549. v. Elizabeth E. Chambeelaix, second dau. and 
fifth child of Mary Child and Col. Moody Chamberlain, b. in 
Newbury, Vt, 9th March, 1823, m. July 11th, 1850, William 
B. Hibbard. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

1561. i. Elizabeth Chamberlain Hibbard, b. April 30, 1851, m. Feb. 24 
1874, J. W. Baxter. 

1562. ii. Mary Emeline Hibbard, b. April 15, 1856, in Elkhart, Ind., m. 
April 15, 1879, Franklin W. Hall. 

1563. iii. Carrie Frances Hibbard, b. Jan. 10, 1863. in Chicago. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1561. i. Elizabeth Chamberlain Hibbard, eldest child 
of Elizabeth E. Chamberlain and William B. Hibbard, and 
granddaughter of Mary Child Chamberlain, b. 30th April, 1851, 
m. 24th February, 1874, J. Walter Baxter, son of John and 

Rosa Ann Baxter. Reside in Clinton, Iowa, 

s 



250 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1564. i. Rose May Baxter, b. Nov. 30, 1874, d. March 4, 1877. 

1565. ii. William Walter Baxter, b. Feb. 20, 1875. 

1566. iii. Maud Irene Baxter, b. May 10, 1878 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1550. vi. Ezra B. Chamberlain, fourth son and eighth 
child of Mary Child and Col. Moody Chamberlain, b. in New- 
bury, Vt., 4th June, 1825, m. 25th November, 1852, Elizabeth 
H. Bay ley. Reside in Newbury, Yt. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1567. i. Sarah B. Chamberlain, b. Jan. 16, 1858. 

1568. ii. Harry B. Chamberlain, b. Nov. 1. 1862. 

1569. iii. Martha P. Chamberlain, b. Nov. 24, 1866. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1551. vii. Emeline Buxton Chamberlain, third dau. and 
seventh child of Mary Child and Col. Moody Chamberlain, 
b. in Newbury, Vt., February 4th, 1828, m. 25th November, 
1852, Harry Fox, who was born Sept. 29th, 1826. Residence 
Chicago, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1570. i. Harry Chamberlain Fox, b. April 30, 1856, d. July 29, 1856. 

1571. ii. Harriot Amoret Fox, b. Feb. 10, 1858. 

1572. iii. Alice Elizabeth Fox, b. Dec. 13, 1860, d. May 30, 1861. 

1573. iv. Frederick Hurlburt Fox, b. March 24, 1862. 

1574. v. Infant son, unchristened, b. March 20, 1864, d. June 29, 1864. 

1575. vi. Baby Harry Fox b. Nov. 6, 1866, d. Feb. 28. 1867. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1495. x. Lyman Child, fourth son and tenth child of Ben- 
jamin, Jr., and Patience Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 29th Oct. 
1759. Removed to the State of Vermont when quite young, 
with his brother, Cephas Child. Like his brother, he served in 
the army of the Revolution, and drew a pension in his latter 
days. Mr. Lyman Child married and resided in Hartford and 
Hartland, finally settled in Sharon, Windsor Co., Vt, but we 
have been unable to ascertain to whom he was married. He had 
several daughters and one son. One daughter married a Dim- 
mick, and removed to the State of New York. Another married 
James Elliott, of Newbury, Vt, they removed to Canada ; are 
said to have had several children. The son is said to have died 
in Sharon, Vt., but we are not able to trace the line further. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 251 

[Fourth Generation.] 

14>1. iii. Nathanel Child, third child and second son of 
Capt. Benjamin and Patience Thayer, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
April 13, 1717, m. 1st, May 28, 1747, Jemima Bugbee, b. 1726, 
d. Oct. 29, 1760 ; m. 2d, Sept. 19, 1776, Airs. Eleanor Fox. He 
d. June 19, 1791, se. 74 Mrs. Eleanor F. Ohilds d. Nov. 1822, 

se. 91. 

[Fifth Generation .] ( 'hildren : 

1576. i. Darius Child, b in Woodstock, Ct., April 25, 1748, d. May 29, 
1759. 

1577. ii. Nehemiah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 3, 1751, m. 1st, 
May 24, 1774. Elizabeth Shipman; in. 2d, 1785, Mary McClellan. 

1578. iii. Alpha Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 19, 1753, m. March 
21, 1777, Mary May. 

1579. iv. Spencer Child, b in Woodstock, Ct., April 11, 1756. A 
soldier in the Revolution, and d. 1784. 

1580. v. Jemima Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, May 28, 1760, ra. 1st, Dec 
19, 1782, Samuel Jones; m. 2d, a Mr. Bacon. She d. April 18, 1788. 

1581. vi. Charity Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Oct, 31, 1762, d. Nov. 18, 
1764. 

1582. vii. Cyril Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept, 23, 1771. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1577. ii. Nehemiah Child, second son and second child of 
Nathaniel and Jemima Bugbee Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
Feb. 3, 1751, m. 1st, May 24, 1774, Elizabeth Shipman '; m. 2d, 
1785, Mary McClellan. He d. Jan. 2, 1838. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children. By first marriage : 

1583. i. Charity Child, b. 1775, m. Eleazer Clark, of Belchertown, Mass. 

[By second marriage :] 

1584. ii. William Child, b. in Woodstock. Sept. 24, 1786, m. 1st. Jan. 
23, 1812, Sally Lyon; m. 2d, Oct. 21, 1818, Sally Moore; m. 3d, June 28, 
1829, Sophia Selby. 

1585. iii. Faith Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 10, 1790, d. Aug. 
12, 1824, unmarried. 

1586. iv. Lucretia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 2, 1791, m. Oct. 
1813, Henry Child. [Seepage 185, No. 908, for Children.] 

1587. v. Mary Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 8, 1793, d. March 5, 
1859, unmarried. 

1588. vi. Nathaniel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Feb. 15, 1796, d. 1824, 
unmarried. 

1589. vii. Betsey Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1800, d. 1848, umii 

[Sixth Generation ] 

1581. ii. Dea. William Child, second child and eldest son 
of Nehemiah and Mary McClellan Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
Sep. 21, 1786, married three times— 1st, Jan. 23, 1S12, Sally 



252 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



Lyon. She d. April 4, 1816 ; m. 2d, Oct. 2, 1818, Sally Moore. 
She d. June 2, 1821 ; m. 3d, June 28, 1829, Sophia Selby. She 
d. May 10, 1874. Date of his death not ascertained. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children. By first marriage: 

1590. i. Samuel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Aug. 1815. 

[By third marriage.] 

1591. ii. Sarah M. Child, b. June 5, 1830, m. March 23, 1853, Carlo May. 

1592. iii. Nathaniel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 5, 1833, m. 
1st, Georgiana Sholes, m. 2d, October 27, 1858, Nancy May. 

1593. iv. Wm. L. Child, b. in Woodstock, CU, Aug. 15, 1835. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1591. ii. Sarah M. Child, second child, and only dau. of Dea. 
William and Sophia Selby Child, b. June 18, 1830, in. March 
23, 1853, Carlo May, son of Maj. Asa May, of Woodstock, Ct. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1594 i. Lillian May, b. Aug. 18, 1855, in Woodstock, Ct., d. March 27, 
1868. 

1595. ii. Ezra May, b. Sept. 9, 1857, in Woodstock, Ct. 

1596. iii. Mary L. May, b. April 9, 1860, in Woodstock, Ct. 

1597. iv. Frank N. May, b. July 20, 1868, in Woodstock, Ct. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1592. iii. Nathaniel Child, third child, second son of Dea. 
William and Sophia Selby Child, b. March 5, 1833, married 
twice — 1st, March 20, 1856, Georgiana Sholes, of Brookline, Ct, 
She was b. June 13, 1837, d. March, 1857 ; m. 2d, Oct. 27, 
1858, Nancy May, dau. of Chester May, b. March 18, 1833. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

1598. i. Wilhemina Child, b. Oct. 5, 1857, m. Sept. 1, 1874, Geo. A. 
Paine, son of John Paine, d. Aug. 4, 1875. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1578. iii. Alpha Child, third child and third son of Nath- 
aniel and Jemima Bugbee Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Aug. 19, 
1753, m. March 21, 1777, Mary May, dau. of Stephen and 
Mary Child May, of Woodstock, Ct. He d. Jan. 20, 1809. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children : 

1599. i. Darius Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 26, 1777, m. Feb. 2, 
1802, Letitia Morris. 

1600. ii. Pamelia Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 15, 1780, d. July 
27, 1782. 

1601. iii. Spencer Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 15, 1782, m. March 
20, 1828, Susan Child, dau, of Col. Chester Child, of Woodstock. He d. 
July 21, 1832. She d. 1870. No children. 

1602. iv. Griffin Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 25, 1784, m. twice, 
1st, Aug. 15, 1811, Nancy Peck; 2d, Sarah Field. 



i 

AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 253 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1599. i. Darius Child, eldest child of Alpha and Mary May 
Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 26, 1779, ra. Feb. 2," 1802. 
Letitia Morris. Mr. Child was a large, portly man, of 200 lbs. 
weight, and of fine personal appearance. The record of Mr. 
Child and descendants brings out some points of interest 
worthy of note. Soon after marrying he removed from "Wood- 
stock, Ct, to Fairlee, Orange County, Vt., where he spent his 
long and active life. The country was mostly covered with 
forests, and required man} 7 a sturdy blow to bring the soil 
into a productive state. There was no lack of mutde or 
energy in Mr. Child to reach results that should afford ade- 
quate support for a growing family. He possessed a vigorous 
mind and powerful physical constitution. His enterprise, in- 
dustry and probity secured him prominence among his fellow 
townsmen, by whom he was often promoted to official stations 
in the town and the commonwealth. He attained to easy pecu- 
niary circumstances, and closed his days peacefully in his 
cherished home, Dec. 10, 1862, at the advanced age of 85 years. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1603. i. Alpha Child, b. in Fairlee. Vt.. Nov. 15, 1802. He was a prom- 
ising youth, but died in early manhood, Aug. 21, 1824. 

1604. ii. Almira Child, b. in Fairlee. Vt.. May 28, 1805, d. July 13, 
1805. 

1605 ii. William Child, b. in Fairlee. Vt,, June 14, 1806, m. June 1, 
1831, Lucretia Fulton. 

1606 iv. Mart May Child, b. in Fairlee. Vt,. May 3. 1808, in. lion. 
Alexander Gilmore. 

1607. v. Pamelia Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., Nov. 21, 1811, m. Rev. Dan- 
iel Blodgett. Of him, his brother-in-law, Judge Child, says: "He prepared 
for college at the academy in his native town. Entered Dartmouth college 
from which he graduated in 1818. Was soon licensed to preach as a Con-' 
gregational minister. Was ordained by the Royalton Association of Minis- 
ters in 1825. Settled as pastor in three or four different parishes; died in 
Randolph, Vt.. 1855. One incident in college life is perhaps worthy of 
mention. At the time of the battle at Plattsburg, (1814) Mr. Blodgett, with 
four other members of his class, in obedience to his country's call, enlisted 
in the U. S. service for the common defence. Went to the scene of action 
and remained until honorably discharged, and returned to his Alma 
Mater." No issue from this marriage. 

1608. vi. Edwin Spkncer Child, b. Oct. 20, 1814, m. Aug. 1843, Juliette 
Richmonds. He d. July 5, 1844, leaving no children. Says Judge Child, 
"His widow is a lady of fine qualities, respectably connected, a genial, social 
companion with all her associates." 

1609. vii. Epiiraim Mat Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., Nov. 8, 1874, d. April 
17, 1830. 



254 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1605. iii. Judge William Child, third child, and second son 
of Darius and Letitia Morris Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., June 15, 
1S06, m. Jan. 1, 1831, Lucretia Fulton, dau. of Alexander and 
Sarah Blair Fulton, of Deering, N. H. She was b. in 1808. 
They had six children. 

In stature, Judge Child is six feet, of spare proportions, bear- 
ing more the type of his mother's family than the father's, with 
strong marked features indicating strength and decision of 
character. He has been an influential citizen in town, county 
and state from early manhood. A man esteemed for his quali- 
ties of heart and mind ; justly entrusted with official responsi- 
bilities, he has rendered much public service. Three years he 
represented his town in the State Legislature. Two years he 
held the Governor's commission, as Associate Judge of the 
County Court of Orange; he has held a commission as Justice 
of the Peace for thirty-five or forty years. 

While the Judge claims to be a plain farmer, it has neither 
dwarfed his intellect nor blunted his sensibilities, his liberal and 
enlightened opinions bear the stamp of wisdom and justice. In 
our frequent correspondence with him in the progress of this 
work, we have been impressed with a manliness and dignity of 
bearing which are the result of cultivation of heart and intellect. 
The following extract from one of his letters to us, reveals among 
other things, the effect of his early training under a pious grand- 
mother. He remarks: 

•'You allude to my residence in Muddy Brook parish in Woodstock, Ct- 
Many recollections of my short stay in that strictly Puritan locality fre- 
quently return to my mind. It was there I was first inducted (under a good 
grandmother's instructions) into the mysteries of the Westminster catechism, 
although in my then unripe years I understood no more about " the chief 
end of man "' than I did about the statutes of Patagonia; but it served as an 
exercise to my mind, and left an impression of scripture truths that will 
never be effaced while reason lasts." 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1610. i. Alpha Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., in 1831. Died of a fever at 
Northfield, Vt., Jan. 26, 1853, fe. 22. 

1611. ii. Lucy Jane Child, b. Nov. 1833, m. Charles Hartshorn. 

1612. iii. Lieut. Dakius Griffin Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt.. in 1836, d. 
July 20, 1862, at New Orleans, in U. S. army, in war of Rebellion, ae 26. 

1613. iv. Lieut. Lewis Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., in 1838, m. Dec . 1865, 
Sarah F. Mathewson. 

1614. v. Willard H. Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., in 1840, m. Dec. 25, 
1866, Julia A. Mann. Was in the Union army. 

1615. vi. Ella S. Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., in 1848, d. . 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. L'">5 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1611. ii. Lucy Jane Child, second child and eldest dau. of 
Judge William and Lucretia Fulton Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt, 
Nov. 1S33, m. Charles Hartshorn, of Littletown N. H. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1616. i. Charles C. Hartshorn, b. (date not ascertained.) Killed while 
coasting on an icy bill. 

1617. ii. William C. Hartshorn, b. (date not ascertained.) Is fittiiiu r 
(1879) for college under Rev. Wm. Spencer Child, Newport, R. I. 

1618. iii. Harry Hartshorn. Said to be a bright, active boy of much 
promise and of fine talents. 

[Eighth Generation. 

1613. iv. Lieut. Lewis Child, fourth child and third son of 
Judge William and Lucretia Fulton Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt, 
in 1838, m. Dec. 6, 1865, Sarah F. Mathewson, grand-daughter 
of Griffin Child, of Providence, R. I. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children. 

1619. i. Lewis F. Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., 1867, d. 1868. 

1620. ii. Anna M. Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., 1869. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

1614. v. Willard H. Child, fifth child and fourth son of 
Hon. Wm. and Lucretia Fulton Child, b. in Fairlee, Vt., 1840, 
m. Dec. 25, 1S66, Julia A. Mann. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1621. i Howard F. Child, b. in Bradford, Vt., May, 1868, d. Sept. 1868. 

1622. ii. Robert A. Child, b. in Bradford, Vt., May, 1871. 

1623. iii. Charles H. Child, b. in Bradford, Vt., Feb. 1874, d. July, 
1875, at Newport, Vt. 

1624. iv. Lewis A. Child, b. at Newport, Vt., Feb. 1876, d. at Fairlee, 
Sept. 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1606. iv. Mary May Child, fourth child and second dau. 
of Darius and Letitia Morris Child, b. in Fairlee. Vt., May 3, 
1808, m. Hon. Alexander H. Gilmore, who was born at Acworth, 
N. H., L804. d. at Fairlee, 1S73. Mr. Gilmore was a farmer 
by occupation, and in that calling accumulated a handsome 
estate. Being a man of more than ordinary ability and intelli- 
gence he arose to prominent positions in public affairs. He 
served five terms as a member of the Vermont State Legislature ; 
held the office of Judge of Probate for eight years in succession ; 

was one year County Judge. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

1625. i. Leticia Jane Gilmore, b. Sept. 1831, d. 1847. 

1626. ii. Spencer C. Gilmore, b. 1833, d. 1855. 



256 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBURY, MASS. 



1627. iii. Edwin A. Gilmore, b. 1835, m. Mary B. Russell, of Oxford. 
N. H. Went to Delhi, Iowa, and soon after died of consumption, in 1859. 

1628. iv. James H. Gilmore, b. 1837, m. 1869, Maria Aldrieh: have 
three children, names not ascertained. Residence, Topeka, Kansas. 

1629. y. Wm. H. Gilmore, b. in 1839, m. Mary T. Haseltine, of Oxford, 
N. H. They live on the old homestead in Fairlee, Vt.. with the mother of 
Mr. Gilmore. They have a son and daughter, names not ascertained. 

1630. vi. Mary A. Gilmore, b, 1841, d. 1852. 

1631. vii. Pamelia C. Gilmore, b. 1844, d. 1851 

1632 viii. Jane Cathie Gilmore, b, 1849, d. 1865. All the deaths in 
in this family are from consumption. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1602. iv. G-riffin Child, fourth child and third son of 
Alpha and Mary May Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 25, 
1784, married twice— 1st, Aug. 15, 1811, Nancy Peck, b. 1775, 
d. April 15, 1816 ; m. 2d, Jan. 22, 1818, Sarah Field, b. June 
23, 1796, d. 1855. He d. Feb. 12, 1862, se. 78. 

Mr. Child was a man of imposing appearance, being six feet 
in height and of solid proportions, his weight, when in health, 
being 200 lbs. or over ; of a florid complexion, with dignified 
bearing, he looked the man of mark he was, having the unmis- 
takable signs of intellectual strength and decision of character. 
He possessed a clear and logical mind, and was usually success- 
ful in maintaining his positions. He was a man of much culture 
and for a number of years, in early manhood, a successful edu- 
cator, popular and influential among the intelligent and cul- 
tured classes, and held in high esteem by all his acquaintances. 
On relinquishing his profession as a teacher, he established him- 
self in the mercantile business in Providence, E. I., where he 

spent the balance of his life, becoming quite opulent. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1633. l. Lewis Peck Child, b. in Providence, R. I., Nov. 28. 1812, unm. 

1634. ii. James Griffin Child, b. in Providence, R. I., Aug. 15, 1815, 
d, Aug. 15, 1821. 

1635. iii. Wm. Spencer Child, b. in Providence, R. I., Nov. 14, 1818, m. 
July 27, 1841, Georgiana Clough Jones, m. 2d, Jessie Isabella Davis. 

1636. iv. Anna Maria Child, b. in Newport, R. I., Oct. 17, 1820, m. 
Jan. 13, 1841, Geo. Mathewson. 

1637. v. James Griffin Child, 2d, b. in Providence, R.I., Jan. 24, 1825. 

1638. vi Infant, unchristened, b. Aug. 3, 1827, d. Aug. 10, 1827. 

1639. vii. Sarah Field Washington Child, b. in Providence, R. I., 
Feb. 22, 1835, d. Dec. 19, 1836. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1635. iii. Rev. William Spencer Child, D. D., third child 
and third son of Griffin and Sarah Field, b. Nov. 14, 1818, m. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 257 

Georgiana Clough Jones, by whom he had six children. She 
died and he married second, Jessie Isabella Davis, and by her 
he had three children. 

Mr. Child is a prominent clergyman of the Episcopal church, 
and resides in Newport, R. I. He is a graduate of Brown Uni- 
versity, and has received the honorary degree S. T. D. 

Rev. Dr. "William Spencer Child has established in Newport. 
Rhode Island, a school for young men, called the " St. John's 
School," the standard of whose scholarship is so high that none 
can graduate therefrom without honorable and thorough attain- 
ments. In the report of the school year, ending 14th of July, 
1880, we find the committee on compositions, stated in their 
written report, that they "commend with especial emphasis three 
features in the essays, namely, their marked originality : their 
extraordinary accurac}' of spelling ; and their ease and clearness 
of style, rising in some instances to genuine elegance." Else- 
where we read : "None receive a first testimonial unless the 
average of his scholarship for the year is 95 per cent, or up- 
wards; or a second testimonial unless 90 per cent, or upwards." 
Several prizes were competed for, some offered by the Rector, Dr. 
Child, others by friends of the institution, Dr. Batterson, of 
Philadelphia, and Dr. Malcolm. We are pleased also, to record 
the promise for the future of the Child name, that a Miss Edith 
Child, and a son, Clarence G. Child, of the Rector, were award- 
ed prizes for declamation and Latin. The school is finel} 7 locat 
ed on the Point, near the bay in this most healthful, attractive 
watering place. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1640. i. Wm. Pope Child, b. in Newport, R. I . Dee, 10, 1843, d. Jan. 
29, 1845. 

1641. ii. Lewis Peck Child, b. in Newport, R. I., June 14, 1847. Busi- 
ness 26 Exchange Place, New York City. 

1642. iii. Spencer Child, b. in Newport, R. I., Nov. 22, 1849, d. Nov. 12, 
1852. 

1643. iv. Samuel Penny Child, b. in Newport, E. I., Dec. 3, 1854. 

1644. v. Annie Maria Child, b. in Newport, R. I . Nov. 21, 1855. 

1645. vi. Wm. Spencer Child, Jk., b. in Newport. E. I.. Dec. 23, 1856. 

1646. vii. Herbert Doane Child, b. in Newport, E. I.. May 26. 1862. 

1647. viii. Clarence Griffin Child, b. in Newport, E. I.. March 22, 
1864. 

1648. ix. John Child, b. in Newport, R. I., Dec. 14, 1865. 



25S BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1636. iv. Anna Maria Child, fourth child and eldest dau. 
of Griffin and Sarah Field Child, b. in Newport, R. L, Oct. 17r 
1820, m. Jan. 13. 1841, Geo. Mathewson. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1649. i. Sarah Field Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., Nov. 5, 1841, 
m. Dec. 6, 1865, Lieut. Lewis Child. 

1650. ii. Amy Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., May 11, 1843. 

1651. iii. Brockholst Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., Oct. 17, 1844* 

1652. iv. Mary Waite Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., May 23, 1846. 

1653. v. Ann Maria Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., Nov. 20, 1847, 
d. Aug. 27, 1848. 

1654. vi. George Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., Sept. 19, 1849, d. 
May 2, 1850. 

1655. vii. Wm. Spencer Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., Feb. 20, 
1851, d. Jan. 1, 1853. 

1656. viii. Lewis Child Mathewson, b. in Newport, R. I., June 2 s *,. 
1854. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1484 viii. Sarah Child, sixth child and third dau. of Capt. 
Benjamin and Patience Thayer Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct. ,. 
Nov. 19, 1722, m. Feb. 19, 1746, Jedediah Morse, of Wood- 
stock. This family became distinguished, and frequently allied 
to the Child family in subsequent years. 

Deacon Jedediah Morse was a man of very strong individu- 
ality of character, he was born in Woodstock, Ct., in 1726. In 
1763, we find he was chosen a deacon of the church, at or near 
the same time, another deacon was chosen, they had been mar- 
ried at very nearly the same date, and together they served the 
church for over fifty years ; the wives of each deceased about 
the same time, after being married nearly sixty years — and the 
closely united friends after surviving their wives some fourteen 
years, were scarce separated in death. Dea. Jedediah Morse 
was chosen selectman in 1763, and in 1764, representative to 
the General Court of Connecticut, a position he held for thirty 
one years. In 1764, he was chosen town clerk, and held this 
office twenty-seven years. He was made Justice of the Peace 
in 1774, and continued in this office until 1801. He was a man 
very methodical in all his modes of thought and act, and a 
quaint resume of his life, recapitulating his numerous official 
acts in the differing offices held by him, with sundry com- 
ments thereon, in the same measured, singular phraseology, is 
yet in the custody of a descendant. Mrs. Sarah Child Morse 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 259 

died on the 5th of April, 1805, aged 83, having been married 
fifty-eight years. Dea. Morse died in 1819, aged 93. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1657. i. Dorothy Mouse, b. Dec. 20, 1747, d. April, 1755. 

1659. ii. Jonathan Morse, b. April 30, 1850, in. .\zubah Lyon. 

1659. iii. Calvin Morse, b. June 30, 1852, m. Sophia Mason. 

1660. iv. Amos Morse, b. 1755-6, d. young. 

1661. v. Dorothea Mouse, b. April 29, 1757, married twice— 1st, Silas 
May: 2d, a Mr. Bliss. 

1662. vi. Lydia Morse, b. June 22, 1759. in. Jan. 10, 1781, Capt. Willard 
Child. [See page 179 for children.] 

1663. vii. Jedediah Morse, b. Aug. 23, 1761, m. March 14, 1789, Eliza- 
beth Ann Breese. 

1664. viii. Leonard Morse, b. Nov. 11, 1763, d. Dec. 16, 1763. 

1665. ix. Sarah Morse, b. Jan. 2. 1765, d. Feb. 5. 1765. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1663. vii. Rev. Jedediah Morse,D.D., fourth son and seventh 
child of Sarah Child and Dea. Jedediah Morse, b. in Wood- 
stock, Ct, Aug. 23, 1761, m. March 11, 1789, to Miss Elizabeth 
Ann Breese, of Shrewsbury, N. J. He was a graduate of Yale 
College, New Haven, Ct, in 1783. 

Dr. Morse was a prominent clergyman of the Congregational 
denomination during a long settlement at Charlestown. Mass. 
He was, however, better and more widely known as the 
" Father of American Geography." His first work on this 
subject, and the first of the kind published in America, he 
prepared and printed while yet a tutor in Yale College, in 
1781. This was succeeded by larger works on Geography, 
also several gazetteers. But not alone was Dr. Morse absorbed 
in these geographical and historical studies ; he was also a 
noted polemic — in opposing the Unitarian belief. He was sole 
editor of the Panoplisl, a magazine published in Massachu- 
setts for several years. Dr. Morse's life was one of unusual 
activity for a clergyman of that period ; we find he was at one 
time under appointment of the United States Government, sent 
to the Northwest to examine into the condition of the Indians, 
as a result of this tour he published a volume entitled "Indian 
Report." He also published a " History of New England." 
The University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in recognition of his 
scholarly attainments conferred upon him his Doctorate. At 
the age of sixty-five Dr. Morse closed his full and respected 
life in New Haven, Ct,, June 9, 1826, leaving a family honor- 



260 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

ably sustaining the father's repute ; two of his sons possessed 

marked literary and scientific ability, with unusual inventive 

genius. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1666. i. Samuel Finley Breese Morse, b. April 27, 1791, m. twice— 1st, 
Oct. 6, 1818. Lucretia Walker; m. 2d, Aug. 10, 1848, Sarah Griswold. 

1667. ii. Edwards Morse, b. Oct. 4, 1792, d. 1793. 

1668. iii. Edwards Sidney Morse, b. Feb. 7, 1794, in. April 1, 1841, 
Catherine Livingston. 

1669. iv. Richard Cary Morsk, b. May 6, 1797, m. twice— 1st, 1828, 
Louisa Davis; m. 2d, Aug. 1856, Harriet Messenger. 

1670. v. Elizabeth A. Morse, b July 12, 1798, d. 1804. 

1671. vi. James E. Morse, b. June 20, 1801, d. young. 

1672. vii. Elizabeth Morse, b. Jan. 27, 1803, d. in infancy. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1666. i. Prof. Samuel Finley Breese Morse, LL. D., 
eldest son and child of Eev. Dr. Jedediah and Elizabeth A. 
Breese Morse, and grandson of Sarah Child and Dea. Jedediah 
Morse, was born in Charlestown, Mass., on the 27th April, 
1791, was twice married, his first marriage to Miss Lucretia 
Walker, daughter of Mr. Charles Walker, of Concord, N. H., 
on the 6th October, 1818. Mrs. L. W. Morse died on the 7th 
February, 1827. Prof. Morse was married on the 10th Au- 
gust, 1 828, to Miss Sarah Griswold. 

Dr. Morse's name is so prominently linked with the applica- 
tion of magnetism to telegraphy, as almost to obscure the other 
talents of this distinguished man. He was a graduate of Yale 
College, New Haven, Ct, in 1810. The year following he 
went to England, in the compan}^ of Washington Allston, the 
artist ; and while there became the pupil of the celebrated 
Benjamin West, in painting, to which pursuit he devoted many 
years ; was so successful while yet in Great Britain as to enter 
one of his pictures, '• The Dying Hercules," at an exhibition of 
the Eoyal Academy. In 1813 he received the gold medal of the 
Adelphi Society of Arts, at the hands of the Duke of Norfolk. 
Prof. Morse returned to America in 1815 and spent most of 
his time for the succeeding ten or twelve years in portrait 
painting. In 1829 Prof. Morse again crossed the Atlantic, re- 
maining abroad some years ; upon his return voyage, in 1832, 
the " idea of a permanent recording telegraph was suggested 
to him by a fellow voyager, Dr. Jackson." From this time 
Prof. Morse was absorbed by this project until, in 1 844. his 








l07'J^< 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 



•261 



labors were crowned with success by the establishmenl of the 
first electric telegraph in the United States. The history of 
his toils and disappointments cannot be written, but the final 
triumph compensated. Dr. Morse's invention was accepted in 
Germany, and ready recognition, with due honors, were be- 
stowed upon him by the sovereigns and literary and scientific 
associations of Europe. From his Alma Mater, Prof. Morse 
received the Doctorate of Laws in 184(3. Dr. Morse lived to 
see the world almost girdled with the magic wires of tele- 
graphy. He died in New York City on the 2d April, 1872. 
National honors in memoriam were accorded him in the Hall 
of Representatives, at the Capitol in Washington, D r C, on the 
night of Tuesday, the 16th April, 18.72, on which occasion we 
received as relatives the following invitation : 



The National Telegraph Memorial Association 

Requests the honor of your presence at the 

Memorial Services in honor of the late Sam'l F. B. Morse, 

to be held in the Hall of Representatives. 

Tuesday evening, April 16 th, 1872, at 7^ o'clock. 

Committee of Arrangements. 

On the part 0/ the Congress 0/ the United States. 
E. H. Roberts, X. Y. ' F. W. Palmer, Iowa. F. E. Shoeer, N. C. 

C. F. STANSBURY, H. D. COOKE, M. G. EMERY, 

C C COX, T. B. KERR, D- W. BLISS, 

L. A. GOBRIGHT, A. J. MVER, O. E. BABCOCK, 

HORATIO KING, S. A. DUNCAN, B. S. HEDRICK, 

Rir-H'n \V\LHCH. R. M. CORWIXE. . 

H. Am.dc" s7/y ' A. S. Solomons, Chatrman. 

Seats will be provided for the invited guests of the Association and the ladies 

accompanying them. 



The services were of unusual interest, nothing common- 
place or trite was uttered, the accompanying programme of 
services but epitomises, we can do no more, The marvellous 
invention was its own testimony on the occasion from in front 
the speaker's desk, the ticking so slight as not to interrupt 
the speeches, tolled off its weird, sibyllistic characters, flash- 
ing words of greeting to all the principal cities of the Union, 
and, most strange of all, was the sending to His Honor, the 
Mayor of London, and the immediate response, dated London, 
Wednesday morning, one o'clock the 17th April, received in 
the Hall on Tuesday evening, the 16th, before eleven P. m. 



262 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

(Druer of fHemorial Scrnice© 

IN HONOR OF THE LATE 

SAMUEL F. B. MORSE, 

IN THE 

Hall of the House of Representatives, Tuesday Ev'g, April 16, 1872. 
Chairman, MR. SPEAKER BLAINE, 

ASSISTED BY THE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Prayer by the Rev. Dr. W. Adams, D. D., of New York. 

Mr. Speaker Blaine will announce the Order of Proceedings. 

Music by the Marine Band. 



Presentation of Resolutions by Hon. C. C. Cox, M. D., of Washington, D. C. 

Address by Hon. J. W. Patterson, of New Hampshire. 

Address by Hon. Fernando Wood, of New York. 

Yocal Music by the Choral Society of Washington. 

Address by Hon. J. A Garfield, of Ohio. 

Address by Hon. S. S. Cox, of New York. 

Music by the Marine Band. 

Address by Hon. D. W. Voorhees, of Indiana. 

Address by Hon. N. P. Banks, of Massachusetts. 

Vocal Music by the Choral Society of Washington. 

Benediction by the Rev. Dr. Wheeler, of Poughkeepsie, New York. 



Committee of Arrangements. 

ON THE PART OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
E. H. Roberts, New York. F. W. Palmer, Iowa. F. E. Shober, North Carolina. 



C. F. STANSBLRV, H. D. COOKE, M. G. EMERY, C. C. COX, J. B. KERR. 

D. W. BLISS. L. A. GOBRIGHT, O. E. BABCOCK, A. J. MYER, HORATIO KING, 
RICH'D WALLACH, S. A. DUNCAN, R. M. CORWINE, B. S. HEDRICK. 

H. Amidon, Secretary. A. S. Solomons, Chairman. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children. 

1673. i. Susan Walker Morse, b. Sept. 2, 1819, m. about 1839 Edward 
Lind. 

1674. ii. Charles Walker Morse, b. March 17, 1823, m. June 15; 1849, 
Mannette Lansing. 

1675. iii. James Finley Morse, b. Jan. 20, 1825. 

1676. iv. Samuel Arthur Breese Morse, b. July 24, 1849, d. July 17, 
1876, in New Orleans, La. 

1677. v. Cornelia Livingston Morse, b. April 8, 1851. 

1678. vi. William Goodrich Morse, b. Jan. 31, 1853, m. Oct. 2, 1873, 
Katherine Crabbe. 

1679. vii. Edward Lind Morse, b. March 29, 1857. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1673. i. Susan Walker Morse, eldest daughter and child 
•of Prof. S. F. B. Morse, LL. D.. was born on the 2d Septem- 



I 

AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 263 

ber 1819, about 1839 was married to Mr. Edward Lind, a mer- 
chant and planter in Arroyo, Porto Rico, West Indies. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child. 

1680. i. Charles Walker Lind, b. about 1840. Business agent of 
sugar estates in Arroyo, Porto Rico, W. I . 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1674. ii. Charles Walker Morse, eldest son and second 
child of Prof. S. F. B. Morse, LL. D., was born March 17, lb23, 
and 15th June, 1849, married Miss Mannette Lansing, who 
was born 3d April, 1830, a daughter of Bleecker B. Lansing. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1681. i. Bleecker Lansing Morse, b. Sept. 29, 1850, m. Sept. 29, 1879, 
in Texas. 

1682. ii. Samuel Finley B. Morse, b. Nov. 24, 1854. 

1683. iii Henry Lind Morse, b. Jan. 4, 1860, d. April 4, 1863. 

1684. iv. Susan Lind Morse, b. Jan. 26, 1863. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

167^ vi. William G. Morse, fourth son and sixth child of 
Prof. S. F. B. Morse, LL. D., b. January 31, 1853, m. October 
2, 1873, Katherine Crabbe, of Havana, Cuba. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

16841. i. Leila Livingston Morse, b. June 25, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation] 

1668. iii. Sidney Edwards Morse, third son and child of 
Dr. Jedediah and Elizabeth A. Breese Morse, and grandson of 
Sarah Child and Dea. Jedediah Morse, was born in Charlestown, 
Mass., on the 7th February, 1794, married on the 1st April, 1841, 
Catherine Livingston, dau. of Rev. Dr. Gilbert R. Livingston, 
of Philadelphia, Pa. She was born on the 24th September, 1813. 
Mr Morse graduated at Yale College, New Haven, Ct, in 1811 ; 
was associated with his brother, Prof. S. F. B. Morse, in the 
development of several of his mechanical inventions. He was, 
however, known widely as a journalist, first in 1815 establish- 
ing a weekly religious paper in Boston, Mass., called the Bos- 
ton Recorder; with this paper his connection was brief, and in 
1823, he united with his younger brother, Rev. Richard Morse, 
in establishing the New York Observer, the earliest religious 
paper in the State. He inherited the literary tastes of his father, 
and was himself the compiler of works upon physical and poli- 
tical geography. "In June, 1839, he in connection with Henry 
A. Munson, produced by a new art termed, Cerography, map 



264 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

prints superior to those hitherto known." His death occurred 
in the City of New York, on the 23d December, 1871. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1685. i. Gilbert Livingston Morse, b. Feb. 8, 1842, m. Feb. 8, 1871, 
Mary Coles. 

1686. ii. Lucretia Morse, b. Dee. 28, 1843, m. Oct. 2, 1862, Charles K. 
Herrick. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1685. i. Gilbert Livingston Morse, eldest child of Sidney 
E. and Catherine Livingston Morse, b. in New York City, on 
the 8th February, 1842, married on the 8th February, 1871, 
Mary Coles, dau. of John Coles, of Worthing, England. She 
was b. May 1 8th, 1850. Mr. Morse's business, rentier, on Nassau 
street, New York City. Residence in Yonkers, Westchester, 
Co., N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1687. i. Maud Livingston Morse, b. Dec. 17, 1871. 

1688. ii. Sidney E. Morse, b. Jan. 29, 1874. 

1689. iii. May Morse, b. May 3, 1876. 

1690. iv. Elsie Morse, b. Oct, 8, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1686. ii. Lucretia Morse, only dau. of Sidney Edwards 
and Catherine Livingston Morse, was born in the City of New 
York, on the 28th December, 1843, married on the 2d October, 
1862, to Charles K. Herrick : separated, she resumes her paternal 
name, as do her children. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1691. i. Livingston B. Morse, b. Aug. 29, 1863. 

1692. ii. Lucretia Morse, d. in infancy. 

1693. iii. Kate Morse, d. in infancy. 

1694. iv. Edna Morse, b. Aug. 23, 1-869. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1669. iv. Eichard Cary Morse, fourth son and child of 
Rev. Dr. Jedediah and Catherine Breese Morse, and grandson 
of Sarah Child and Dea. Jedediah Morse, was born in Charles- 
town, Mass., on the 6th May, 1797, married twice — 1st, in 1828, 
to Louise Davis ; married 2d, in August 1856, Harriet Mess- 
inger. 

Rev. Mr. Morse graduated from Yale College, New Haven, 
Ct. in 1812. Studied for the ministry and received his licensure, 
but was not long occupied with the duties of that profession. 
In 1823, he became the partner of his brother, Sidney E. Morse, 



'AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 265 

in publishing the widely circulated journal, the New York Ob- 
server^ a pioneer enterprise in this State, now a fixed fact The 
possession by this family of such distinctive and unusual talents, 
verify the theories of transmission. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1695. i. Elizabeth Mouse, b. Any. 5, 1829, m. 1853, Samuel Colgate. 

1696. ii. Charlotte Mouse, b. 1831. m. Asphxwall Hodge. 

1697. iii. Sidney E. Mouse, !j Nov. 25, 1835, in. Nov. 1, ls.y.i, Annie 
Church. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1695. i. Elizabeth Morse, eldest dan. and child of Eev. 
Eichard Cary and Louisa Davis Morse, b. 5th Aug. 1829, in. in 
1853. Samuel Colgate. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
1697i. i Richaud Morse Colgate. 
1698 ii Gilbert Colgate. 

1699. iii. Sidney Colgate. 

1700. iv. Austen Colgate. 

1701. v. Samuel Colgate, Jr. 
1802. vi. Russel Colgate. 

[Seventh Generation. 

1696. ii. Charlotte Morse, second dau. and child of Eev. 
Eichard Cary and Louisa Davis Morse, b. in 1831, m. Aspin- 
wall Hodge. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1703. i. Bayahd Hodge, d. in infancy. 

1704. ii. Aspinwall Hodge, Jr. 

1705. iii. Richard Hodge. 

1706. iv. Hugh Hodge. 

1707. v. Samuel C. Hodge. 

[Seventh Generation. 

1697. iii. Sidney E. Morse, eldest son and third chiid of 
Eev. Eichard Cary and Louisa Davis Morse, b. 26th Nov- 
ember, 1835, m. 1st November, 1859, by Stephen H. Tyng, D.D., 
Miss Anna Matilda Church, dau. of John Bartsee and Maria 
Trumbull Silliman Church, and grand-daughter of Prof. Silli- 
man, of Yale College, New Haven, Ct. She was b. August 8th, 
1839. Mr. Morse's business, rentier 140 Nassau St., New York 
City. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

1708. i. Mary Trumbull Morse, b. Dec. 7. 1862. 

1709. ii. Elizabeth Breese Morse, b. June 16, 1864. 
T 



266 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1485. vii. Moses Child, seventh child and fourth son of 
Capt. Benjamin and Patience Thayer Child, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct, Oct. 27, 1725, m. June 24, 1752, Mary Payson. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children. 

1710. i. Lucretia Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Aug. 17, 1756, d. young. 

1711. ii. Rufus Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug 30, 1702, m. twice — 
1st, Miss Marcy, she died Feb. 2, 1789, m. 2d, Jan. 18, 1795, Anna Barnum. 

1712. iii. John Payson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1763. 

1713. iv. Oliver Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 12, 1764. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1711. ii. Rufus Child, eldest child of Moses and Mary 
Payson Child, b. Aug. 30, 1762, in. 1st, Miss Marcy, she d. 
Feb. 2, 1789 ; he m. 2d, Anna Barnum. 
[Sixth Generation.] Child. 

1714. i. Lucretia Ann Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 6, 1796, 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1220. ix. Chloe Child, fifth daughter and ninth child of 
Capt. Elisha and Alice Manning Child of Woodstock, Conn., 
b. in Woodstock, March 28th, 1767, m. March 31st, 1790, 
Leonard Walker, eldest son of Phineas and Susanna Hyde 
Walker, of Woodstock. 

Mr. Leonard Walker was a mechanic and his ingenuity was 
remarkably versatile. His father being a blacksmith, he could 
not well avoid that trade. He learned also the art of card 
making, which was then after a most primitive fashion ; each 
tooth of the card being made singly, and by hand, and the 
holes in the leather for the insertion of the teeth were made in 
the same slow and laborious manner. After the leather and 
teeth were prepared, they were sent to all the families in the 
region who would receive them, that the women and children 
might push the teeth into their place in the leather. Mr. 
Leonard Walker was a pioneer in devising a method to accom- 
plish this work by machinery. Mr. and Mrs. Walker, with 
their family, at that time consisting of four children, in the 
year 1797 removed from Woodstock, Conn., to Strafford, Vt. 
In this new settlement, where mechanics were few, his ingenu- 
ity had ample range, for not only everything that could by any 
possibility come under the name of blacksmithing was done 
by him, but clocks, fowling-pieces, spinning-wheels, pocket- 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 267 

knives, brass-kettles, trunk-locks, jews-harps, tin horns and 

teapots, when out of order, were brought to him : and he felt 
as much at home in soldering a gold finger-ring, or ear-ring, 
he did in splicing a crow-bar. As a citizen he was active in 
every enterprise that was a benefit to a new country, took a 
deep interest in having the best schools: was foremost in the 
erection of the meeting-house, whose beautiful situation on the 
knoll at the north end of the green is unsurpassed He made 
the vane for the steeple in that "universal manufactory," and 
his son Charles, (afterward the Rev. Charles Walker, D. D.,) 
then eight years old. sawed the laths for the plastering. His 
whole influence was in favor of law and order; he early em- 
braced the cause of temperance, and gave up his much loved 
pipe. In all these good ways and works Mrs. Walker was a 
thorough help-meet. Guiding her children and her whole 
household in paths of pleasantness and peace, a true " Mother 
in Israel." For about twenty years Mrs Walker read Scott's 
Family Bible through each year, with all the notes and obser- 
vations. Never had a numerous family a more excellent 
mother. Mr. George Walker, the eighth child of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Walker, remained at home until he was of age. and 
does not remember ever hearing an angry word pass his moth- 
er's lips. Mrs. Walker died on September 1st. 'IS A3, her hus- 
band survived her seven years, passed from earth on the 9th 
September, 1851. [This sketch of Mr. and Mrs. L. Walker is 
furnished us by Mr. Geo. Walker, of Xorthford. Ct] 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1715. i. Charles Walker, b. Feb. 1, 1791. m. Sept. 22. 1823, Lucretia 
Ambrose. 

1716. ii. Susan Walker, b. May 22, 1792, m. Dea. Luther Child. 

1717. iii. Benjamin Walker, b. Get. 11. 1793, d. young. 

1718 iv. Leonard Walker, b. Get. 1. 1794, m. Sept. 11, 1822, ITannah 
Child. (See descendants of Copt. John Child, of Bath, N. H., for cl - 
Or en.) 

1719. v. Alice Walker, b. March 23, 1796, ni. Sept. 3, 1831, John 
Child. {See page 215, No 1229, for childn . 

1720. vi. Sylvia Walker, b. March 13, 1798, d. April 28, 1874. 

1721. vii. Chloe Walker, b. Nov. 30. 1799, "a sweet singer," d. Sept. 
30, 1832. 

1722. viii. George Walker, b. March 8, 1802, m. Jan. 2, 1832, Minerva 
Hoadley. 

1723." ix. Freeman Walker, b. Feb. 4. 1*04, d. Sept. 21. 1*27. 
1724. x. Eliza Walker, b. June 5, 1805, m. March 29, 1835, Andrew- 
Chandler, d. Dec. 9. 1827, one child. 



26S BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1725. xi. Phineas Walker, b. Jan. 13, 1807, m. Aug. 19, 1839, Mahala 
Walker. 

1726. xii. Lucius Walker, b. Feb. 1, 1809, m. Jan. 1, 1837, Henrietta 
Davenport, d. June 30, 1878. 

1727. xiii. Aldace Walker, b. July 20, 1812. m. April 30, 1841, Mary 
A. Baker, d. July 24, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1715. i. Rev. Charles Walker, D. D., eldest son of Chloe 
Child and Leonard Walker, b. in Woodstock, Conn., 1st Feb- 
ruary, 1791, was a vigorous, active and wide awake youth, fond 
of sports and athletic games, but loving books better ; often he 
would leave his playmates to sit happily beside his mother, read- 
ing such old standard works as Doddridge, Milton, Young and 
Baxter. But he had little leisure for play or reading, for the 
exigencies of a new settlement left small space for pastime. 
The saw-mill, shop and farm kept him (and his younger broth- 
ers) busy, and his labors were performed with a willing mind 
and deft hand. When he was of age he went to Woodstock, 
Conn., among the friends of his parents, and his own infant 
days ; through the influence of these relatives he obtained a 
position in a woolen mill, and such was his dexterity, inherited 
from his father, with the training of the "universal manufac- 
tory " of the home in Vermont, that he was soon at the head 
of the establishment, where he continued a few years, giving 
entire satisfaction to his employers. Under the preaching of 
the Kev. Samuel Backus, he was led to embrace the truth in 
Jesus the Christ, and, like Paul, the first question was " Lord, 
what wilt Thou have me to do?" He decided to devote him- 
self to saving others, and he never lost sight of that aim, keep- 
ing to it most singly through a long and very useful life. 

Mr. Walker devoted himself to study for the ministry of the 
Congregationalist order. His first settlement was at Rutland, 
Vermont, and hither he brought his bride. Miss Lucretia Am- 
brose, of Concord, New Hampshire, to whom he was married 
on the twenty second of September, 1823. Mr. Walker re- 
mained with the church in Rutland for ten years. After a 
period of unusual labor, his voice failed utterly and he was 
compelled to resign his parish. Mr. Walker took charge of 
the high school in Castleton, Vermont, and in about two 
years recovered his voice and was settled over a Congrega- 
tional church in Brattleboro, Vermont, in January, 1835, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 269 

where for eleven years lie was a beloved and sueeessi'ul pastor. 
A very decided stand taken on the temperance question gave 
offence to some of the parish, and lest injury should befall the 
church Mr. Walker withdrew, preferring the good of others to 
his own ease — though firm in his views <>i' the light in his 
position. In August, 1846. Dr. Walker was installed as pastor 
of a church in Pittsford, Vermont, where hecontinued till, from 
advanced age, he felt impelled to resign — a ministry of more 
than eighteen years had greatly endeared him to this people. 
In the words of one who knew him well, "Dr. Walker was 
endowed by nature with a mind of vigorous and substantial 
j m >wer. He was clear, consecutive and strong. Few men saw 
better than he did the main points on which the truth of an 
argument depended. Few men could put those points into 
statements more simple, logical and convincing. His intellect 
was healthful. There was nothing morbid, still less senti- 
mental, in his constitution. The robustness of his physical 
health, as well as the practical character of his early training 
contributed, doubtless, to this sound quality of his mental 
action. This characteristic gave his judgment great weight. 
He was a man strong for counsel. In the decision of vexed 
questions of controversy, in ecclesiastical or social matters, his 
verdict was prett}^ certain to be right. Hence few men were 
oftener called into requisition when difficulties arose in 
churches. His service upon councils was no small or unim- 
portant part of his work. Without being a strenuous or in- 
tense thinker, his mind was active and retained its alertness to 
the last. He lived in his age. He looked with always inter- 
ested eye upon the progress of affairs in state and society. He 
read history for its lessons of practical and present instruction. 
He had definite opinions in politics. He applied the principles 
of the gospel to public affairs. Hence his occasional dis- 
courses, drawn out by events in the social and political world, 
were always instructive and interesting. As a sermonizer he 
was marked by some signal merits. His style of composition 
was singularly clear and chaste. He wrote good English. No 
one ever mistook his meaning. This directness and effective- 
ness of address was aided by a pulpit manner in a high de- 
, gree impressive. Dr. Walker was a large, dignified and hand- 
some man, a man whose presence commanded respect and 



270 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

attention. His voice was penetrating and powerful. It was 
also expressive of tender and strong emotions, so that in his 
more earnest passages he held his hearers in an intense and 
solemn grasp. In his social character Dr. "Walker was genial 
and affectionate. Not a great talker, he was fond of good con- 
versation. He was loved by all the children. The success of 
others pleased him. He did not think that wisdom was dead, 
or the world growing worse all the time. But perhaps the 
most characteristic trait of Dr. "Walker was his simplicity. He 
was a man utterly incapable of finesse or duplicity. Few men 
ever carried such demonstration of sincerity in all they did. 
Of exceedingly few could it be said with equal truth, he was a 
'man in whom there was no o-uile.' Dr. and Mrs. Walker 
had six children. His death occurred on the 28th of Novem- 
ber, 187<\ at Pittsford, Vermont. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1728. i. Charles A. Walker, b. Sept. 10, 1824, d. Aug. 12. 1838. 

1729. ii. Anne A. Walker, b. Aug. 26. 1826, m. Aug. 15, 1866, to George 
N. Boardman, Prof, in the Theo. Sem. in Chicago. 

1730. iii. George Leon Walker, b. April 10, 1830, m. Sept. 16, 1858, 
Maria Williston. 

1731. iv. Lucretia A. Walker, b. May 4, 1832, d. July 18, 1833. 

1732. v. Stephen A. Walker, b. Nov. 2, 1835, unm. Lawyer in New- 
York. 

1733. vi. Henry P. Walker, b. July 3, 1838. Physician; unm. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1730. iii. Kev George Leon Walker, D. D., son of Eev. 
Dr. Charles and Lucretia Ambrose Walker, born in Rutland, 
Vermont, married Sept. IB, 1858, Miss Maria "Williston. Dr. 
Walker is a clergyman of the Congregationalist order. Settled in 
Hartford, Ct. He has never known vigorous health, yet has 
been able to sustain himself well as a sermonizer ; is an interest- 
ing, not to say fascinating preacher. The lawyer and the child 
being equally attracted. Dr. "Walker's health has been so frail 
as to compel the resignation of several settlements, but as 
strength permits, he still labors for the Master. Dr. and Mrs. 

Walker have had two children. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1734. i. Williston Walker, b. July 1, 1860. 

1735. ii. Charles A. Walker, b. Sept. 27, 1861, d. July 22, 1869. 

1722. viii. George Walker, eighth child of Chloe Child 
and Leonard Walker, b. in Strafford, Vt., Sth March, 1802, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 271 

m. Miss Minerva Hoadley, daughter of Jairus Hoadley, Esq., 
of Northford, Ct., 2d January, 1832. 

Mr. Walker was a mechanic and manufacturer. He spent 
his youth upon the home farm, in the saw-mill, and more pleasur- 
ablv in the '•universal manufactory" of his father, and inherited 
largely the peculiar gifts of his father of l>rain and hand. Up- 
on attaining his majority he left home, and was fully and suc- 
cessfully employed for some eight years in various machine 
shops. Upon his marriage he settled in New Haven, Conn., 
where he established a lucrative business in stoves, etc. Mr. 
George Walker was the first to introduce patent warm air 
furnaces into churches and dwellings in that city. After resid- 
ing in New Haven about fourteen years, Mr. Walker in the 
year le44, removed with his family to the City of New York, 
and for fifteen years his was the leading house in the city for 
warming dwellings and public buildings. He sold out and 
occupied the next ten years in many kindly acts of service for 
others, making this his business as it was truly his pleasure : 
this included the investigation of the mining and metal resources 
of the country, involving three journeys to the Rock}- Moun- 
tains of Colorado, made by mule teams. Not being a writer, 
Mr. Walker has never published an account of these trips, — 
though the home-fireside and social board are often enlivened 
bv reminiscences of the varied and amusing experiences of those 
long journeys. Not unremunerative were they either to Mr. 
Walker or his associates. The evening of life is spent by Mr. 
and Mrs. Walker in the home of Mrs. Walker's infancy, where, 
as in all the years of their united life, happiness gilds their un- 
selfish lives, and competence gives ease. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1724. x. Eliza Walker, fifth daughter and ninth child of 
Chk>e and Leonard Walker, b. in Strafford. Vermont, June 5, 
1805, m. 29th March, 1825, Andrew Chandler. Mr. and Mrs. 
Chandler had one child, a daughter, who married and has sev- 
eral children. Mr. Chandler died litth Dec, 1827. 
[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

1736. i. Elmixa Chaxdler, married to Mr. Richard Lakeman, of Boston. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1736. i. Elmixa Chandler, only child of Andrew and Eliza 
Walker Chandler, and granddaughter of Chloe Child Walker, 
married about 1853, Richard Lakeman. 



272 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1737. i. Frank Lakeman, b. July 14, 1854. 

1738. ii. Emma J. Lakeman, b. Nov. 24, 1857. 

1739. iii. Richard J. Lakeman, b. Jan. 17, 1861. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

1725. xi. Phineas Walker, sixth son and eleventh child 
of Chloe Child and Leonard Walker, b. in Strafford, Vermont, 
13th January, 1807, m. 19th August, 1839, Miss Mabala 
Walker, daughter of Freeman Walker, of Connecticut. 

Mr. Phineas Walker was the home-son, and was such a son 
to his parents in their years of infirmity through age, as we are 
warranted to expect a son to be, whose training is that of scrip- 
tural command. It is only a truthful, though high praise to 
say of him, "He is a good specimen of honest New England 
character ; is a deacon in the church, and a substantial sup- 
porter of those things that are of good report." Mr. Walker 
combines the farm pursuits with mechanical as did his father. 
This fertility of brain power seems a frequent possession of 
the genuine New Englander. Three children were given them 
of whom only one remains. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1740. i. Leonard Walker b.May 1. 1836, d. July !, 1841. 

1741. ii. Harriet Walker, b. Jan. 2, 1838, d. Dec. 15, 1858. 

1742. iii. Susan Walker, b. July 7, 1842, m. Perley Chandler. 
[Seventh Generation.] 

1742. iii. Susan Walker, third child of Phineas and Mahala 
(Walker) Walker, b. 7th July, 1842, m. Perley Chandler, a 
jeweler of Barre, Vermont, November 11, 1867. Has two 
children. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1743. i. Hattie Chandler, b. May 9, 1869. 

1744. ii. Minerva Chandler, b. May 24, 1875, d. Sept. 5, 1875. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1726. xii. Lucius Walker, seventh son and twelfth child 

of Chloe Child and Leonard Walker, b. in Strafford, Vermont 

Feb. 1, 1809, m. Miss Henrietta Davenport, Jan. 1st, 1837. Of 

four children granted to them, only one is now living. Two 

noble sons of rare intellectual powers in early manhood rested 

from their labors, and went home almost on the threshold of 

their young manhood. Mr. L. Walker d. June 30, 1878. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1745. i. Aldace Atwood Walker, b. Jan. 30, 1839, d. Oct. 23, 1861. 

1746. ii. Alice H. Walker, b. Feb. 10, 1841, d. April 12, 1845. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 273 

1747. ii. Edna Minerva Walker, b. Oct. 23, 1843. in. Pitzhugh M. Dibble' 

1748. iv. Lucius Pierpont Walker, l>. March 2!). ist4.">, d. -Inly 13, 1873. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1745. i. Aldace Atwood Walker, eldest son of Lucius 
and Henrietta Davenport Walker, b. January 30, 1839. Was 
a genuine scholar, educated at the Free academy in New York 
City. He was a young man of great promise, and though so 
young when called home, had already become a successful 
teacher. He died of consumption, on the 23d of Oct. 1861. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1748. iv. Lucius Pierpont Walker, fourth child and 
second son of Lucius and Henrietta Davenport Walker, b. 
March 29, 1845. 

Lucius was in some respects a remarkable child. When only 
four years old he would repeat on his sister's melodeon any 
tune she would play ; simple airs of course, as she was young ; 
at first not keeping time, but would touch every note, and soon 
would get the time. At eight years of age he did not incline 
to music at all, but was wholly absorbed in his studies. He 
would give the diameter of each planet, with its distance from 
the sun, the length of its day and year, with the relative size of 
each, and number of their moons, as fast as he could speak. 
And on the blackboard he would make a diagram of the whole, 
and in doing it he would make the chalk fly rapidly. At fifteen 
years of age he was a sly rogue, manifested in sundry ways 
beside running away and enlisting in the 2d Connecticut Heavy 
Artillery, under the assumed name of Charley Morris, so that 
his parents could not find him. But when once with the army, 
he wrote to his parents, and ever after was as regular in his cor- 
respondence with the home friends as the exigencies of war would 
permit. He was, what he looked, a mere boy, but he carried 
his musket, haversack and other accoutrements like a veteran, 
and never flinched, though marching twenty-four and even 
thirty-six hours consecutively. He was with Gen. Sheridan in 
all the battles of the Shenandoah Valley. In his own words 
we give an incident of his Shenandoah experience : 

"At that time I was stationed at Corps Headquarters in the capacity of 
'Provost Guard,' and in company with others of the guard used frequently 
to go into the country on foraging expeditions. On such occasions we gen- 
erally went ten or twelve miles from the camp, and were of course liable to 
the attacks of guerrillas with whom the country -wanned. At this time we 



274 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

started with the teams about daylight, and after travelling about four hours, 
halted at a barn, which stood near the road ; the main part of our squad 
(about twenty in all) commenced loading the wagons with hay, sending out 
six of us 'sheep-hunting,' which always formed an important part of our 
expeditions ; having the reputation of a good shot, I was chosen one of the 
six. We did not find any until we had gone fully half a mile from the 
wagons, when we saw a large flock in an inclosed lot. When sufficiently 
near, we opened fire.' The echoing reports of our pieces had scarcely died 
away when we suddenly saw three puffs of white smoke arise from a belt 
of wood directly before us, about two hundred yards distant, and three 
bullets with their peculiar zip, zip, zip, flew past our heads As our mus- 
kets were discharged we could not return the fire, but started for the wagons 
at full speed, followed by a scattering volley of musketry from at least twenty 
mounted guerrillas, whom we could now see emerging from the wood on the 
gallop toward us. As we were on foot we knew it would be useless to try to 
outrun them, and consequently determined to fight it out. For this purpose 
we selected an old building composed of huge pine logs, which Providentially 
stood near. On arriving here we loaded our pieces, and as the guerrillas 
came within fifty yards we fired into the it, which knocked one man over 
and brought the rest to a halt For a few moments all was quiet. Then 
one of them approached waving a handkerchief and calling on us to surren- 
der if we did not want our d-d throats cut; we told him we could not see 
the point, when he departed cursing like a pirate, in which he was assisted 

by his comrades, who all tried to see who could vituperate the Yankees 

the worst, treating us with an occasional bullet, but not dari g to advance. 
We kept up a random fight for a short time, but fearing our ammunition 
would become exhausted, resolved to cease firing until they made some new 
hostile demonstration. In a few moments we saw they were trying to flank 
us, about half of them going on our right, and the rest on our left. Pres- 
ently we saw they were preparing for a charge; accordingly, three of us 
took one side and three the other, fixed our bayonets and resolved to sell 
our lives dearly. Soon they advanced, receiving our fire which killed two 
of them when within twenty yards we rose and prepared to give them cold 
steel, when suddenly an overwhelming volley was poured into them by a 
party of our cavalry, which were out on a scout. At this new turn of affairs 
the surviving ruffians instantly made tracks, but were pursued and taken 
prisoners before they could reach their horses. Among the nine prisoners 
was the notorious Dick Saunders. Thirteen other guerrillas lay on the 
ground killed and wounded. After this we left for our wagons, not however 
forgetting our sheep." 

In his sketch of his army life, he thus describes the battle of 

Cedar Creek : 

"Just before morning we heard several volleys of musketry, but at first 
paid little attention to it, as we thought it picket-firing. We were soon in- 
formed of our mistake for orders came to pack up and fall in. We formed 
in line and marched toward the firing, halting in the road just in front of a 
ravine. The morning was foggy, and we could not see far, but presently 
discovered two lines of battle in front of us, which we took to be our own 
men. But on receiving a volley from them learned our mistake. We re- 



AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. 275 

plied to their fire for about fifteen minutes, and then being ordered to fall 
back, a panic seemed to seize everybody, and for aboul two miles we made 
quick time, unti 1 we were stopped by a line of our cavalry, when we (the 6tb 
corps) halted and sunn after gave i he Rebels two tremendous volleys which 
had the effect of making them stop quite suddenly. We then were pul on 
the skirmish line for about three hours, when the arrival of Sheridan fixed 
things up by funning for a charge which was -nun done, and in all my array 
life, I never saw a more desperate charge. The Johnnie* stood as long as 
they could and then left, and when nighl came we found ourselves in our 
old camp, and thus ended the battle of Cedar Greek." 

After Lee's surrender he had an honorable discharge. He 
had not grown much in his three years' service, and his musket 
shoulder was drawn down so much we feared it might prove a 
permanent deformity. But he soon began to grow, his shoulder 
obtained its right position, and he became a good-sized, well 
formed man. The family moving from New Haven. Conn., to 
Louisville. Kentucky, and his four year old passion for music 
reviving, he was soon at the head of the musical profession in 
Louisville; and was by a unanimous vote elected leader of the 
Organist Club. He composed several airs. He never used to- 
bacco, never took intoxicating drinks, though both were so com 
mon in the army. He became a communicant of the church, 
and was in every respect an exemplary young man. His death 
was sudden and unaccountable. He was bathing with others 
in the Ohio river, sank and did not rise. His death was upon 
the 14th July. 1872, when in his twenty-fifth year. 1 

[Sixth Generation] 

1727. xiii. Be v. Aldace Walker, D. D., thirteenth child 
and eighth son of Chloe Child and Leonard Walker, was born 
in Strafford, Vermont, 10th July, 1S12. He was an ex- 
ceedino-lv pleasant bov and a studious youth. At the age of 
eighteen he was converted, and immediately commenced prepa- 
ration for the ministry. He graduated from Dartmouth Col- 
lege, Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1837; and from the Theo- 
logical Seminary in Andover, Mass., in 1840. In the same 
year he was called to settle over the Congregational church in 
West Rutland. A'ermont, where he remained until 1862, when 
failing health compelled him to give up the pastorate, to the 
lasting regret of his people. After two years his health was so 
far restored as to permit him to accept a call to Wallingford, 
Vermont, where he remained until his death. 

'We are indebted to his Gncle Mr (rem-ge Walker for this sketch. 



276 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Earty in his ministry he was elected a member of the corpo- 
ration of Middlebury College, to whose interests he was ever 
after devoted. He was for many years a corporate member of 
the " American Board of Foreign Missions." In the language 
of one who knew him well, " The character of Dr. Aldace 
Walker was a harmonious one, centered upon an abiding pur- 
pose, and distinguished by sound judgment, such as usually 
comes from absence of selfishness, and devotion to a great 
cause. Such a character drew to itself duties as well as digni- 
ties. In the general convention and in the councils of the 
church, as well as in the affairs of his own parish, his wise ad- 
vice was sought and followed. He was a leader b} ? the divine 
right of superior wisdom, tact and fidelity. It was impossible 
to come within the reach of his character without being im- 
pressed with its sincerity ; its entire freedom from disturbing 
ambition, and the depressing influence of a conflict between the 
outward surroundings of life and its inward purpose. In his 
ministry of twenty-one years in West Rutland, he became 
identified with his parish in an unwonted degree. His words 
were received with respect by his people who always trusted 
him. Revivals marked his ministry, which had no drawback 
to its success. It stands a monument 01 his life, lie was 
happy in his work, which never fretted him. He had a faculty 
of saying and doing things easily. His power was in the pul- 
pit, where he showed his capacity to lead men. He never mis- 
led his hearers or left them in doubt, that it was best for them 
to accept the truth. As trustee of Middlebury College he was 
always self-possessed, and never doubted that a way would 
open out of all difficulties. No one had a calmer head, or 
firmer decision." Dr. Aldace Walker was married to Miss 
Mary A. Baker, April 30th, 184:1, in the same year of his grad- 
uation from the Theological Seminary and settlement at West 
Rutland, Vermont. Dr. Walker's death occurred at Walling- 
ford, Vermont, the place of his last parochial charge, 24th 
July, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1749. i. Aldace F. Walker, b. May 11, 1842, in. April 6, 1868, Katie M. 
Shaw. 

1750. ii. Leonard Baker Walker, b. Oct. 5, 1845, d. Aug. 6, 1846. 

1751. iii. Mary Malvina Walker, b. Nov. 18, 1851, is a teacher in 
Brattleborough, Vermont. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 277 

[Seventh Generation ) 

1749. i. Aldace L\ Walker, eldest child of Rev. Dr. 
Aldace and Mary A. Baker Walker, b. in West Rutland, Ver- 
mont, m. Miss Katie M. Shaw, April 6, L868. Mr. Walker is 
a lawyer and resides in Rutland, Vt. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1752. i. Richard Walker, b. Oct. 25, 1872, d. Jan. 19, 187G. 

1753. ii. Robert Walker, Ij, Aug. 24, 1874. 

1754. iii. Harold Walker, b. June 5, 1876. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1222. xi. Betsey Child, seventh dau. and eleventh child 
of Capt. Elisha and Alice Manning Child, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct., 1773, m. Feb. 21, 1797, Alfred Walker, son of Phineas and 
Susannah Hyde Walker. An excellent mechanic doing busi- 
ness in East Woodstock, Ct., the place of his birth. A man of 
genial disposition, affable, hospitable, of strict integrity, and a 
most excellent citizen. A worthy father of seven children, 
who have not failed to honor their parentage. Mr. Walker 

was born March 29, 1774, d. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

1755. i. Emily Walker, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Feb. 3, 1797, m. 1833, 
Isaac E. Smith. 

1756. ii. Elisha Child Walker, b. Sept. 1799, m. Sept. 30, 1824, Sylvia 
Child, (For children see JS T o. 912, p. 195.) 

1757. iii. Adaline Walker, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, 1801, m. August 14, 
1821, John Hibbard. 

1758. iv. Elvira Walker, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 5, 1803, d. 1830, 
unmarried. Much admired for personal beauty, loveliness of character and 
accomplishments as a singer. 

1759. v. Alfred Walker, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. July 29, 1805, m. 
Eunice Minor. Mr. W. is a real estate and loan broker in New Haven, Ct. 
Had several children. 

1760. vi. James Walker, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. March 12, 1808, rn, 
Isabel Hibbard. Farmer and mechanic, resides in Woodstock, Ct. Had 
two daughters, not living. 

1761. vii. William Walker, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, May 15, 1810, m. 
Marie Dunham in 1836, d. March 27. 1870. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1755. i. Emily Walker, eldest dau. and child of Betsey 
Child and Alfred Walker, b. m Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 3, 1797, 
m. 1^33, Isaac E. Smith, a lumber merchant of New York City. 
She d. October 29, 1870. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1 762. i. Edward A. Smith, b. in New York, July 25, 1835, in. March 3, 
1868, Mrs. Melissa Heath. 



278 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1763. ii. Ernest L. Smith, b. in New York, Nov. 29, 1837, m. April 18, 
1866, Caroline W. Marther; have no children. Mr. Smith is in the lumber 
business with his father in New York City. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1762. i. Eev. Edward A. Smith, eldest son of Emily Walker 
and Isaac E. Smith, and grandson of Betsey Child Walker, b. 
July 25, 1835, m. March 3, 1868, Mrs. Melissa Heath (nee 
Knox), dau. of Charles W. Knox of Chester, Mass. Rev. Mr. 
Smith is pastor of the Congregational church in Farmington, 
Ct; have two children. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1764. i. Herbert Knox Smith, b. in Chester, Mass., Nov. 7, 1869. 

1765. ii. Earnest Walker Smith, b. in Farmington, Ct., June 5, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1757. iii. Adaline Walker, third child of Betsey Child 
and Capt. Alfred Walker of East Woodstock, Ct., b. 1801, m. 
Aug. 14, 1821, John Hibbard, moved to Dundee, 111., d. July 

24, 1 857. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1766. i. John Hibbard, b. Dec. 24, 1826, m. Nov. 18, 1851, Catharine 
Thompson. 

1767. ii. Adeline Hibbard, b. about 1828, m. Nov. 8, 1865, L. D. Ken- 
dall. 

1768. iii. Elvira Hibbard, b. Dee. 25, 1831, m. Jan. 15, 1852, Geo. E. 
Slade. 

1769. iv. Emily Hibbard, b. Dec. 25, 1831, d. May 7, 1857. 

1770. v. Minerva Hibbard, b. Jan. 23, 1836, m. Sept. 20, 1859, Frank 
Slade. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1766. i. John Hibbard, first child of Adaline Walker and 
John Hibbard, and grandson of Betsey Child Walker, b. Dec. 
24, 1826, m. Nov. 18, 1851, Catharine Thompson, she d. July 
6, 1857 ; m. 2d, Elizabeth Goodwin, she d. 1869 ; m. 3d, Le- 
vantia Richards. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

By first marriage. 

1771. i. John Lawrence Hibbard. b. July 2, 1857. 

By second marriag*. 

1772. ii Frank G. Hibbard, b. May 15, 1867. 

By third marriage. 

1773. iii. Louis R. Hibbard, b July 8, 1874. 

1774. iv. Kate E. Hibbard, b. Sept, 12, 1877. 



AXD HIS DESCENDANTS. 279 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1767. ii. Adeline Hibbard, second child of Adaline 
Walker and John Hibbard, and granddaughter of Betsey 
Child Walker, b. about 1828, m. L. D. Kendall, Nov. 8, 1850. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

1775. i. Arthur D. Kendall, b. July 3, 1852. 

[Seventh Generation] 

17HS. iii. Elvira Hibbard, third child of Adaline Walker 
and John Hibbard, and granddaughter of Betsey Child 
Walker, m. Jan. 15. 1852. Geo. E. Slade. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1776. i. Emily Slade. b Nov. 8, 1852, m. Dec. 25, 1872, Emmet O'Con- 
nell. 

1777. ii. Charles W. Slade. b. March 18, 1857. 

1778. iii. Addie W. Slade, b. May 1, 1861. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1770. v. Minerva Hibbard, fifth child of Adaline Walker 
and John Hibbard, and granddaughter of Betsey Child 
Walker, b. Jan. 23, 1836, m.^Sept. 20, 1859, Frank Slade. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1779. i. Harry G. Slade, b. March 22, 1861. 

1780. ii. Susie Slade, b. April 17, 1867. 



280 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



CHAPTER IV. 

Edward Child, the third child of Capt. Benjamin and Grace 
Morris Child, was not of the families that went to Woodstock, 
Ct. He remained on the old homestead and raised a family in 
Eoxbury, Mass. We note this fact, as we give the other sons 
as emigrating to Woodstock, under head of Woodstock 
Families. 

[Third Generation.] 

17. iii. Edward Child, third child and son of Benjamin 
and Grace Morris Child, and grandson of the Emigrant Benja- 
min Child, b. in Eoxbury, Mass., Nov. 1, 1687, m. 1712 Mar- 
garet Weld. He was the possessor of the old homestead, 
the successor of his father Benjamin Child, Jr. He was well 
known as a glazier and as a farmer, and noted as a large 
landholder, holding grants in numerous deeds, copies of which 
and a number of originals are in the possession of David Weld 
Child, of Boston, and later of Auburndale, Mass., of the seventh 
generation. 
[Fourth Generation.] Children. 

1781. i. Hannah Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Dec. 7, 1712, m. April 18, 
1734, Thomas Baker, Jr. 

1782. ii. John Child, b. in Roxbnry, Mass., Jan. 26, 1714, m. Jan. 26, 
1742, Esther Child. 

1783. iii. Eleazer Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., March 11, 1717, d. yg. 

1784. iv. Stephen Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 19, 1719, in. 

1785. v. Edward Child, Jr., b. in Roxbury, Mass., Sept. 13, 1721, in 
Miss Perrin. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1782. ii. John Child, second child and eldest son of Ed 
ward and Margaret Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Jan. 
26, 1714, m. Jan. 26, 1742, Esther Child. 
[Fifth Generation] Children. 

1786. i. Hannah Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., April 20, 1743, d. young. 

1787. ii. Margaret Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., April 8, 1745, d. April 
26, 1775. 

1788. iii. Priscilla Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Dec. 20, 1748, d. April 
14, 1750. 

1789. iv. Hannah Child, 2d, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Jan. 30, 1750, m. 
March 17, 1774, Abner Craft. 



• AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. 281 

1790. v Est eer Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., March 2, 1753, d. young. 

1791. vi. John Child, Jr., b. in Roxbury, Mass., June 16, 1756. Ee 
was successor to Edward Child, his grandfather, to the old homestead of 
Benjamin Child. He also was well known as a glazier, as well as a large 
possessor of Landed estates, there being twenty or more original deeds and 
copies of which he was the grantee. He died unmarried at Wrentham, 
Sept. 2, 1825. 

1792. vii. Stephen Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 10, 1758, m May 
25, 1786, Sarah Weld. 

1793. viii. Johanna Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Oct. 10, 1700. 

1794. ix. Ann Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Jan. 22, 1762 unmarried. 

1795. x. Catharine Child, b in Roxbury, Mass., Sept. 3, 1764, m. John 
Dale. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1792. vii. Stephen Child, seventh child and second son of 
John and Esther Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 10, 1758, 
m. May 25, 1786, Sarah Weld. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children. 

1796. i. Stephen Child, Jr., b. in Roxbury, Mass., March 16, 1787, m. 
Dec. 2, 1813, Hepzebah Coburn Richards. 

1797. ii. John Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Feb. 8, 1789, m. April 
24. 1817, Sarah Richards. 

1798. iii. Margaret Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., March 11, 1791, m. 
Feb. 9, 1814, Benjamin Williams. 

1799. iv. Harriet Child, b. April 11, 1793. m. Augustus Perrin. 

1800. v. Sarah Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass , June 9, 1795, d. 1811. 
1801 vi. David Weld Child, b. in Roxbury; Mass., June 27, 1798, d. 

Sept. 20, 1798. 

1802. vii. David Weld Child, 2d, b. in Roxbury, Mass.. Aug. 2, 1799, d. 
1816, by a fall which fractured the spine. 

1803. viii. Edward "Augustine Child, ) J>. Aug. 3, 1804, m. Sarah Wales. 

- Twins. 

1804. ix. Esther Child, ) b. Aug. 3, 1804, d. 1805. 

1805. x. Elizabeth Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., July 23, 1805, d. Aug. 
7, 1805. 

1806. xi. Benjamin Franklin Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Oct. 12, 
1806. m. Aug. 17, 1836, Helen Brown. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1790. i. Stephen Child, Jr., eldest child of Stephen and 
Sarah Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., March 16, 1787, m. 
Dec. 2, 1813, Hepzebah Coburn Richards. Mr. Child was a 
coal and lumber dealer in Boston. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children. 

1807. i. Sarah Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Jan. 6, 1815, m. Dec, 1840, 
Elbridge Gerry Dudley, by Rev. John Pierrepont, 

1808. ii. William Henry Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Oct. 8, 1816, d. 
Nov. 28, 1816. 

U 



282 BENJAMIN" CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1809. iii. Margaret Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Jan. 4, 1818, m. June 
14, 1854, John Albree. 

1810. iv. Martha Ann Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Oct, 10, 1820, m. 
Nov. 19, 1857, E. G. Dudley. 

1811. v. David Weld Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Aug. 7, 1822, m. Jan. 
13, 1848, Olive Turner Thayer 

1812. vi. Stephen Franklin Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Dec. 8, 1824, m. 
March 27, 1851, Mary E. Pollett. 

1813. vii. Daniel Weld Child, b. in Boston, Mass , Jan. 25, 1828, m. 
May 5, 1859, Ellen B. Cunningham. 

1814. viii. Mary Richards Child, b. in Boston, Mass. Nov. 7, 1831. 

1815. ix. Elizabeth Richards Child, b. in Boston, Mass , March 4, 1835, 
d. Nov. 27, 1835. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1811. v. David Weld Child, fifth child and second son of 
Stephen, Jr., and Hepzebah Coburn Child, b. in Boston, Mass., 
Aug. 7, 1822, m. by Rev. Dr. N. Adams, Jan. 13, 1848, Olive 
Turner Thayer, dau. of Geo. W. Thayer, a merchant of Bos- 
ton. Mrs. C. was b. May 7, 1823. Mr. Child was formerly a 
grain dealer ; later a real estate broker in Boston. Resides in 
West Newton, Mass. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1816. i. Lucy Child, ) b - in Boston, Dec. 28, 1848, d. soon. 

[ Twins. 

1817. ii. Walter Child, ) b. in Boston, Dec. 28, 1848, d Nov. 5, 1862. 

1818. iii. Caroline Child, b June 23, 1852, in Boston, Mass. 

1819. iv. Harriet Child, b. in Boston, July 25, 1854 

1820. v. Geo. Stephen Child, ) *>. in Boston, Ap. 17, '58. d. Ap. 21, '58. 

y Twins. 

1821. vi. Grace Morris Child, ) b. in Boston, Ap. 17, '58, d. Ap. 18, '58. 

1822. vii. Frances Child, b. in Boston, Aug. 21, 1859. 

1823. viii. Stephen Child, b. in Boston, Aug. 14, 1866. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1813. vii. Daniel Weld Child, seventh child and fourth 
son of Stephen, Jr., and Hepzebah Coburn Richards Child, b. 
in Boston, Jan. 25, 182S, m. 1859, Ellen B. Cunningham. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1824. i. Edith Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Oct. 31, 1859. 

1825. ii. Margaret Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Oct. 21, 1862. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1797. ii. John Weld Child, second child and second son 
of Stephen Child, Jr., and Sarah Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, 
Mass., Feb. 8, 1789, m. April 24, 1817, Sarah Richards. She 
was born Aug. 9, 1791, d. 1832 ; he d. March 21, 1864. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 

1826. i. Mary Caroline Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass.. Jan. 1">. 1818, m. 
May 2, 1840, Stephen Jenks. 

1827. ii. Esther Maria Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., May 12, 1819, in. 
Feb. 10, 1842. J. Metcalf. 

1828. iii. John A vekv Richards Child, b. in Roxbury. Mass., Aug. 29, 
1821, lives in Dorchester, Mass. 

1829. iv. John Weld Child, Jr., b. in Roxbury, Mass., .June 6, 1823, d. 
1840. 

1830. v. Edward Augustus Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Feb. 28, 18S 
ni. 1854, Amanda Pert. 

1831. vi. Sarah Richardson Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Ocl 24. l v 
She was a popular teacher in the public schools of Dorchester, to which she 
was for many years attached. Her death was much lamented. 

1832. vii. Stephen Child, b. Oct. 5. 1831. d. young. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1806. xi. Benjamin Franklin Child, ninth child and 
sixth son of Stephen and Sarah Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, 
Mass., Oct. 12, 1806, m. Aug. 17, 1836, Helen Brown. He 
resided at Hardin, Calhoun county, 111., where he died (date of 
death not ascertained). 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1833. i. Margaret Child, b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 111., June 3, 1838, 
d. Aug. 17, 1839. 

1834. ii. Stephen Child, b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 111., June 20, 1840. 

1835. iii. Benjamin Franklin Child, Jr., b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 
111., July 11, 1842, d. Jan. 22, 1848. 

1836. iv. Thomas Brown Child, b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 111., June 
25, 1844, d. Sept. 3, 1845. 

1837. v. Joseph Perrin Child, b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 111., Oct. 9, 
1845, d. Sept. 28. 1846. 

1838. vi. Edward Child, b. in Hardin. Calhoun Co.. 111.. May 2, 1849, 
d. of cholera, Aug. 8, 1851. 

1839. vii. Harriet Helen Child, b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 111., June 
14, 1849, d. Aug. 22. 1851. 

1840. viii. George Brown Child, b. in Hardin. Calhoun Co., 111., June 
12, 1851. 

1841. is. Sarah Child, b. in Hardin. Calhoun Co., 111., Oct. 30, 1853. 

1842. x. Frank Child, b. in Hardin, Calhoun Co., 111., Aug. 27, 1855. 
The unusual mortality in this family is remarkable, the cause or causes of 

which in most instances are not reported. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1781. iv. Stephen Child, fourth child and third son of 
Edward and Margaret Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 
17, 1719. Was a soldier in the successful expedition under Gen- 
eral Pepperell, (afterwards Sir William Pepperell, made Baronet 
for his prowess, the first of the American Colonists to receive a 



284 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBUKY, MASS. 



title ;) mostly from Boston and vicinity — to Port Royal, in 1745, 
at a period when England was disputing claims with the French. 
Port Royal then in possession of the French, was captured and 
became a British Province, under the name of Nova Scotia. 
When Louisburg, which had been called the Gibraltar of 
America, was taken, and the army had entered the city, the 
soldiers were filled w r ith amazement at the ease with which they 
had possessed it. The fortifications had cost five* millions of 
dollars, and had been regarded as impregnable. Yet an undisci- 
plined army of four thousand farmers and fishermen had gained 
an easy possession. They seemed inspired with the words of 
Whitefield, then in Boston, to the little army as it was about to 
set sail: " Nothing is to be despaired of when Christ is the 
leader." 

Having no date by which to determine with certainty the fact 
and time of Stephens Child's marriage, our knowledge of his 
descendants is inferential rather than positive. But there is 
strong circumstantial evidence that Aaron Child, born in Rox- 
bury, Mass., in 1741, was the son of this Stephen Child, of the 
Port Royal expedition. We think that perfect assurance may 
sometime be obtained.* Lemuel Child who kept the famous 
Peacock tavern in Roxbury, Mass., is known to have been a 
brother to this Aaron Child. 

An amusing incident is related as occurring at this popular 
place of resort. " When the British officers were in Boston, 
Mass., they frequently made up skating parties for suppers, and 
after exercising at the pond, would ride over and partake of the 
good cheer of the Peacock. Upon one of these occasions, so says 
tradition, the "pretty maid" of the inn, afterwards Mrs. Wil- 
liams, a niece of the inn-keeper, was followed by one of the gay 
young bloods into the cellar, whither she had gone for supplies 
for the table. Being familiar with the premises, she blew out 
the lighted candle she held in her hand and made her escape, 
not forgetting to fasten the cellar door behind her. After 
thumping his head against the rafters in the vain effort to follow 
her, her persecutor was finally obliged to alarm the house before 

* If any of Lemuel Child's descendants should see this volume and have 
in their possession any data relative to the ancestry of Aaron Child, born 
1741, they will confer a favor by communicating with Stephen Child of 
New Hartford, Oneida county, New York. 



AND His DESCENDAJS - 285 

he could be released from his awkward position." Washington 
and other distinguished officers were frequent visitors here dur- 
ing the siege. Lemuel Child led the minute men of the third 
parish in the Lexington battle. — {Roxbury paper.) 

[Fifth Generation.] 

1843. Aaron Child, son of Stephen Child of Roxbury") 
Mass., b. in Roxbury, Mass., in 1741. m. Nov. 9. 1869, Susan- 
nah Gridlev. who was b. in Roxbury. in 1746. died Jan. 1". 
1>35. Mr. Aaron Child died Aug. 6, 1795. 

[Sixth Generation] Children: 

1844. i. Aaron Child. Jr. b. Jan. 1, 1770, in. Mary Hall. 

1845 ii. Stephen Child, b. July 17. 1771. in. Dee. 22. 1803, Rebecca 
Williams. 

1846. iii. Susannah Child, b. Aug. 22. 1776, m. 1804, William Blake. 

1847. iv. Anna Child, b. Sept, 3. 1779. in Brookline, Mass.. d. Get. 14. 
1866. 

1848. v. Mary Child, b. Feb. 4. 1788, m. about 1808, Rufus Babcock. 
Four other children were born to this couple, two named Lemuel, one Sam- 
uel, and one William, but they died in infancy, and neither the dates of 
their births or deaths are known. 

[Sixth Generation ] 

1S44. i. Aaron Child, Jr.. eldest son and child of Aaron and 
Susannah Gridlev Child, b. in Brookline, Mass.. Jan. 1. 1770. m. 
about 1794, Miss Mary Hall, who was b. Oct. 21, 1772. in New- 
ton, Mass., and died July 26, 1847. Mr. Child died May 11, 

1847. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1849. i. Aaron Child. Jr., b. Dec. 21. 1795, d. Aug. 3. 1839, a\ 44. 

1850. ii. Mary Miller Child, b. Oct. 16, 1799. m. David Hall. 

1851. iii. William Child, b. Aug. 21, 1802, m.abt. 1826, Hannah Ho\w.-. 

1852. iv. Catherine Eliza Child, b. Feb. 2, 1805. d.June 11. 1859, ae. 54. 

1853. v. Edward Hall Child, b. April 11. 1808. m. Miss Haskell, d. in 
Boston, Sept. 16, 1826. 

1854. vi. Emily Child, b. March 15, 1811, in. 1st, George Hodges: m. 2d, 
Mr. Ripley. 

1855. vii. Rebecca B. Child, b. Aug. 8, 1815. m. abt. 1842, Hiram Hall. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1851. iii. William Childs, third child and second son of 
Aaron and Mary Hall Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Aug. 21, 
1802, m. about 1826, Hannah Bradford Holmes, who was b. 
Aug. 16, 1804. Mrs. H. B. H. Child d. Dee. 7. 1875. Mr. 
Wm. Child was a real estate broker in Boston. Residence, 
Dorchester, Mass., where he died April 22, 1878, ae. 76. 



286 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1856. i. William Childs, Jr., b. 1827, unra. Resides in California. 

1857. ii. Mary Ann Childs, b. March 11, 1831, m. 1853, Isaac W.Pierce. 

1858. iii. Curtis Childs, b. March 4, 1835, m. 1860, Louisa Eveleth. 

1859. iv. Aaron Childs, d. at 17 years of age. 

1860. v. George Childs, d. at 10 years of age. 

1861. vi. Abner Curtis Childs, d. one year old. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1857. ii. Mary Ann Childs, eldest dau. and second child 
of William and Hannah B. Holmes Childs, b. March 11, 1831, 
m. 1852, Isaac W. Pierce, who was born July 24, 1827, and died 
April 20, 1876. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1862. i. James Pierce, b. Feb. 6, 1853. 

1863. ii. Lizzie Pierce, b. June 19, 1862. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1858. iii. Curtis Childs, second son and third child of 
William and Hannah B. Holmes Childs, b. May 4, 1835, m. 
1860, Louisa Eveleth, who was born June, 1837. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1864. i. Jennie Childs, b. March 22, 1862. 

1865. ii. Lucy Childs. b. Dec. 17, 1864. 

1866. iii. Hannah Childs, b. May 16, 1867. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1855. vii. Rebecca B. Childs, fourth dau. and seventh child 
of Aaron and Mary Hall Child, b. Aug. 8, 1815, m. Hiram Hall, 
abt. 1842. Mrs. R. B. Child Hall died in Jamaica Plains, on 
the 19th January, 1873. 
[Eighth Generation] Children. 

1867. i. Edward C. Hall, b. April 3, 1843. 

1868. ii. Hiram Hall, Jr., b. Dec. 17, 1844. 

1869. iii. Henry G. Hall, b. Jan. 23, 1849. 

1870. iv. Emma R. Hall. b. Aug. 23, 1853. 

1871. v. Walter D. Hall, b. Dec. 13. 1855. 

1872. vi. Albert B. Hall, b. April 13, 1858. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1845. ii. Stephen Childs, second son and child of Aaron 
and Susannah Gridley Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., July 17, 
1771, m. Dec. 22, 1803, Rebecca Williams, of Dorchester. She 
was b. at Roxbury, Mass., March 29, 1781, and d. Jan. 3, 1865. 
Mrs. Rebecca W. Childs was a descendant of Gov. Winslow, of 
Massachusetts, her mother's maiden name being Rebecca Wins- 
low. He d. Jan. 16, 1863, aged 91. 



AN'J) HIS DESCENDANTS. 287 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1873. i. Rebecca Winslow Childs, b. 1804, in. June 12, 1832, Reuben ML. 
Stack pole. 

187-1. ii. Susannah Childs, b. March 2, 1806, m. Feb. 10, 1836, Galen V. 
Bowditch. 

1875. iii. Stephen Childs. Jr., b. Jan. 25, 1808, in. Oct. 1, 1845, Harriet 
Richardson. 

1876. iv. Henry Childs, b. Dec. 31, 1809. m. May 10, 1853, EllenJ.Neal. 

1877. v. Martha Williams Childs. b. Feb. 7, 1812, m. June 12, 1833, 
Galen V. Bowditch. 

1878. vi. Nathaniel Ruggles Childs. b, July 15, 1814, m. 1st, April 30, 
1840, Eliza Etta Stone; m. 2d, Nov. 9, 1859, Caroline D. Hayden. 

1879. vii. Samuel Gridlet Childs, b. May 20, 1817. d. Jan. 19, 1818. 

1880. viii. Sarah Winslow Childs, b. Dec. 5, 1818, in. June 1,1848, Win. 
J. Hyde. 

1881. ix. Albert Childs, b. May 3, 1821, in. Dec. 3, 1856, Anna M. 
Dudley. 

1882. x. George Childs, b. Dec. 27, 1823, d. Feb. 15, 1869, unm. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1873. i. Rebecca Winslow Childs, eldest child of Stephen 
and Rebecca Williams Childs, b. in Roxbury, Mass., in 1804, 
in. June 12, 1832, Reuben Markham Stackpole, who was b. 
April 8, 1792. Reside at Boston Highlands. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1883. i. Charles Markham Stackpole, b.Sept. 23, 1833, d. Aug. 24, 1834. 

1884. ii. Horace Markham Stackpole, b. March 16, 1835, d. Sept. 7, 
1837. 

1885. iii. Anna Winslow Stackpole, b. Jan. 2, 1838, m. July 28, 1 £64 
Edward Moulton Lancaster. 

1886. iv. George Reuben Stackpole, b. Sept. 23, 1839, d. Sept, 15, 1853. 

1887. v. Frederick William Stackpole, b. Aug. 20, 1841. 

1888. vi. Stephen Henry Stackpole, b. July 24, 1843, m. Oct. 18, 1871, 
Julia Langley Faunce. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1885. iii. Anna Winslow Stackpole, eldest dau. and third 
child of Rebecca W. Childs and Reuben M. Stackpole, b. in 
Roxbury, Mass., Jan. 2, 1838, m. July 28, 1864, Prof. Edward 
Moulton Lancaster, who was b. March 29, 1832. Prof. Lancas- 
ter is the Principal of the High School, at Hyde Park, Mass., 
he has recently edited a "History of England" for schools. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1889. i. Edward Winslow Lancaster, b. March 2, 1866. 

1890. ii. Alice Rebecca Lancaster, b. Oct. 15, 1869. 

1891. iii. Helen Abbie Lancaster, b. July 29, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1888. vi. Rev. Stephen Henry Stackpole, youngest son 
and child of Rebecca Winslow Childs and Reuben M. Stack- 



288 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

pole, b. in Eoxbury, Mass., July 24, 1843, m. Oct. 18, 1871, 
Julia Langley Faunce, who was b. Feb. 1843. Eev. Mr. S. H. 
Stack pole is a clergyman of the Baptist church, and now resi- 
dent at Saxtons Eiver, Windham Co., Vt. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1892. i. Markham Winslow Stackpole, b. June 5, 1873. 

1893. ii. Pierpont Langley Stackpole, b. Feb. 16, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1874. ii. Susannah Childs, second dau. and child of Ste- 
phen and Eebecca Williams Childs, b. in Eoxbury, Mass., Mch. 
2, 1806, m. Feb. 10, 1836, Galen V. Bowditch. Mrs. Susannah 
C. Bowditch was the second wife of Mr. G. V. Bowditch, his 
first wife was her younger sister, Martha Williams Childs, to 
whom Mr. Bowditch was m. June 12, 1833. She d. Feb. 22, 
1834 Mrs. Susannah C. Bowditch d. Oct. 17, 1869. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children. : 

1894. i. Susan Bowditch, d. in infancy. 

1895. ii. Galen Bowditch, b. Nov. 23, 1837, in Roxbury, Mass. 

1896. iii. Martha Childs Bowditch, b. Jan. 5, 1840, in Roxbury, Mass. 

1897. iv. Joseph Esty Bowditch, b. Mch, 1843, d. Jan. 5, 1871. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1875. iii. Stephen Childs, Jr., eldest son and third child of 
Stephen and Eebecca Williams Childs, b. in Eoxbury, Mass., 
Jan. 25, 1808, m. Oct. 1st, 1845, Harriet Eichardson, dau. of 
Jonathan and Lois Parker Eichardson. She was b. Sept. 25, 
1820. Mr. Stephen Childs, Jr., removed to New Hartford, 
Oneida Co., New York, in 1830, and carried on the tanning 
and currying business for many years with much success. Mr. 
Childs is a man of pleasing presence, and much esteemed. Mrs. 
Childs belongs to a family of high respectability, and is a lady 
of most noble qualities. Eesidence New Hartford, Oneida Co., 
N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1898. i. Stephen Henry Childs, b. Sept. 7, 1846, m. 1876, Mary Elizabeth 
Jenkins. 

1899 ii. Albert Nathaniel Childs, b. Feb. 20, 1850, d. April 9, 1850. 

1900. iii. Emily Lois Childs, b. July 9, 1852. 

1901. iv. Sarah Elizabeth Childs, b. Feb. 5, 1854, d. June 16, 1856. 

1902. v. William Richardson Childs, b. Dec. 18, 1856, d. June 25, 1873. 

1903. vi. Edward Winslow Childs, b. May 30, 1859. 
[Eighth Generation.] 

1898. i. Stephen Henry Childs, eldest son and child of 
Stephen and Harriet Eichardson Childs, b. in New Hartford, New 



A\T> HIS DKSCKXDAN IS. 289 

York, Sept. 7, 1846, m. in 1876, Mary Elizabeth Jenkins, dau. 
of William and Delia Hall Jenkins. She was b. in New York- 
City, Sept. 13, 1854. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1904. i. Willie Richardson Guilds, b. April 30, 1877. 

1905. ii. Edith May Chxlds, b. Feb. 21, 1880, in New Hartford, Oneida 
Co., N.Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1876. iv. Henry Childs, second son and fourth child of 
Stephen and Rebecca Williams Childs, b. in Roxbury, Mass., 
Dec. 31, 1809, m. May 10, 1853, Ellen Jane Neal. Mr. Henry 
Childs d. Jan. 25, 1*76. Resided in Boston, and Cambridge- 
port. He was a printer. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

1906. i. Harry Neal Child, b. Nov. 8, 1854. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1878. vi. Nathaniel Ruggles Childs, third son and sixth 
child of Stephen and Rebecca Williams Childs, b. in Roxbury, 
Mass., July 15, 1814, m. April 30, 1816, Eliza Etta Stone, who 
d. June 12, 1S57. Mr. Childs m. 2d, Nov. 9, 1859, Caroline 
D. Ha}-den. Resided in Dorchester, New Bedford and Rox- 
bury, Mass.: engaged largely in the shoe and leather business. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1907. i. Martha Winslow Childs, b. Jan. 25, 1847, m. Dec. 27, 1870, 
Edward W Nash. 

1908 .i. Nathaniel Ruggles Childs, Jr., b. Jan. 1849, resides in 
Elgin, 111. 

1909. iii. Mary Stone Childs, 1, Aug. 18, 1850, d. Feb. 20, 1854. 

1910. iv. Eliza Etta Childs, b. May 16, 1852. 

1911. v. Frances Stone Childs, b. Nov. 6, 1853, d. March 25, 1854. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1880. viii. Sarah Wlnslow Childs, fourth daughter and 
eighth child of Stephen and Rebecca Williams Childs, b. in 
Roxbury, Mass., Dec. 5, 1818, in. June 1, 1848. William J. 
Hyde. Reside in Brookline, Mass.; bricklayer by occupation. 
[Eighth Generation] Children: 

1912. i. Mary Elizabeth Hyde, b. May 11, 1S49. 

1913. ii. Rebecca Williams Hyde. b. March 19, 1851. 

1914. iii. Harriet Childs Hyde, b. March 19, 1854, m. June 15, 187<i, 
Robert Watson Standart. 

1915. iv. Albert Childs Hyde, b. Oct. 18, 1858, d. May 9, 1864. 

1916. v. George William Hyde. Ii. June 4, 1861. 



290 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1914. iii. Harriet Childs Hyde, third dau. and child of 
Sarah Winslow Childs and William J. Hyde, b. March 19, 
1854, m. June 15, 1876, Robert Watson Standart of Detroit, 
Mich. Hardware merchant, of the firm of " Standart Broth- 
ers," in Detroit. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1917. i. Sarah Winslow Standart, b. Sept. 23, 1877. d. July 5. 1878, in 
Detroit, Mich. 

1918. ii. William Esty Standart, b. Oct. 25, 1879, in Detroit, Mich. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

1881. ix. Albert Childs, fifth son and ninth child of 
Stephen and Rebecca Williams Childs, b. in Roxbury, Mass., 
May 3, 1821, m. Dec. 3, 1856, Anna M. Dudley. Reside in 
Roxbury, Mass.; leather merchant, Boston. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1919. i. Albert Walter Guilds, b. April 11, 1861, in Roxbury, Mass. 

1920. ii. Frederick Tracy Childs, b. April 16, 1866, in Roxbury, Mass. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1846. iii. Susannah Child, eldest dau. and third child of 
Aaron and Susannah Gridley Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., 
Aug. 22, 1776, m. 1804, William Blake. She d. in Boston, 
Mass., Aug. 31, 1866, as. 90 years. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

1921. i. William Blake, Jr., [date of birth not given] d. 1839. 

1922. ii. James Blake, [date of birth not given] went to Indiana. 

1923. iii. John Blake, " " " m. abt, 1833 Lucretia — 

[Seventh Generation] 

1923. iii. John Blake, third son and child of Susannah 

Child and William Blake, m. about 1833 Lucretia 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

1924. i. Anna M. Blake, b. Nov. 2, 1834, m. Sept. 6, 1854, Francis H. 
Holton. 

1925. ii. Walter F. Blake, b June 13, 1836. 

1926. iii. Edwin H. Blake, b. Nov. 2, 1838, m. June 1, 1862, Mary E. 
Parkhurst. 

1927. iv. Clara M. Blake, b. Aug. 31, 1841, m. June 23, 1874, Dr. Byron 
R. Harmon, 

1928. v. Theodore E. Blake, b. Dec. 30, 1843. 

1929. vi. Evelyn Amelia Blake, b. Jan. 13, 1845, in. Nov. 2, 1866, Eben. 
Pratt. 

1930. vii. Frederick William Blake, b. May 1, 1848. 

1931. viii. Arthur Wellesley Blake, b. Oct. 14, 1851. 

1932. ix. Irene Adelia Blake, b. April 13, 1854, d. July 30, 1876. 

1933. x. Josiah Quincy Blake, b. March 30, 1856, d. Sept. 9, 1858. 

1934. xi. George Washington Blake, b. Feb. 4, 1861. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 291 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1924. i. Anna M. Blake, eldest child of John and Lucretia 
Blake, and granddaughter of Susannah Child Blake, b. Nov. 2, 
1834, m. Sept. 6, 1854, Francis H. Holton. 
[Ninth Generation. J Children: 
1935.' i. Francis H. Holton, Jr., b. Feb. 27. 1856. 

1936. ii. Frederick Blake Holton. b. Dor. 23, 1858, d. April 1, 1864. 

1937. iii. Anna M. Holton, b. Nov. 30, 1864. d. Feb. 18, 1866. 

1938. iv. Edward L. Holton, b. 'Slay 4, 1867, d. Aug. 1, 1868. 

[Eighth Generation] 

1926. iii. Edwin H. Blake, third child and second son of 
John and Lucretia Blake, and grandson of Susannah Child 
Blake, b. Nov. 2, 1838, m. June 1, 1862, Mary E. Parkhurst, 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1939. i. Charley Earnest Blake, b. June 4, 1863, d. Oct. 26, 1863. 

1940. ii. Eddielena Marion Blake, b. Aug. 7, 1864, d. Aug. 27, 1864. 

1941. iii. Alfred Elma Blake, b. May 27. 1866. 

1942. iv. Clarence Willfred Blake, b. July 27. 1869. 

1943. v. John Qoncy Blake, b. Oct. 14, 1874. 

1944. vi. Edwina May Blake, b. Dec. 11, 1875. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

1927. iv. Clara M. Blake, second dau. and fourth child of 
John and Lucretia Blake, and granddaughter of Susannah 
Child Blake, b. Aug. 31, 1841, rn. June 23, 1874," Dr. Byron 
E. Harmon. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

1945. i. Bertie Clayton Harmon, b. Aug. 15, 1876, d. April 10, 1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1929. vi. Evelyn Amelia Blake, third dau. and sixth 
child of John and Lucretia Blake, and granddaughter of Su- 
sannah Child Blake, b. Jan. 29. 1845. m. Nov. 2, 1866, Eben. 

Pratt. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1946. i. Frederic Lincoln Pratt, b. Jan. 9, 1867. 

1947. ii. Alice Evelyn Pratt, b. Feb. 16, 1873. 

1948. iii. Susan Wheaton Pratt, b. Feb. 16, 1875. 

1949. iv. William Earnest Pratt, b. Nov. 21, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

1848. v. Mary Childs, third dau. and fifth child of Aaron 
and Susannah Gridley Childs, b. in Brookline, Mass., Feb. 4, 
1788. m. abt. 1808, Rufus Babcock, of Boston. She d. in 
Melrose, Mass., Sept. 2, 1864. 



292 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

1950. i. Caroline A Babcock, b. Sept. 6, 1809, m. April 20, 1834, Joseph 
H. Greene, of Deerfleld, N. H. She d. in Melrose, Mass., April 19, 1877. 
He d. Dec. 8, 1867. 

[Eighth Generation] Children: 

1951. i. Joseph Warren Greene, b. April 26, 1837, in Boston, d. April 
1, 1844 

1952 ii. Benjamin Franklin Greene, b. April 23, 1839, m. June 4, 1861, 
Sarah F. Holmes. 

1953. iii. Caroline Josephine Greene, b. March 24, 1842, m. Sept. 17, 
1862. Henry A. Leonard. 

1954. iv. Mary A. Greene, b. Oct. 10, 1846, m. Sept. 3, 1868, Dr. Joseph 
Heber Smith. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1952. ii. Benjamin Franklin Greene, second son and 
child of Joseph H. and Caroline A. Babcock Greene, and grand- 
son of Mary Childs Babcock, b. April 23, 1 839, m. June 4, 
1861, Sarah F. Holmes, in Melrose, Mass. She was b. in 
Charlestown, Mass., Nov. 8, 1839. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

1955. i. Edith Frances Greene, b. June 12, 1863, in Melrose, Mass. 

1956. ii. Lillian Evelyn Greene, b. Jan. 28, 1865, in Chicago, 111. 

1957. iii. Phillip Holmes Greene, b. Sept. 2, 1869, in Chicago, 111. 

1958. iv Joseph Greene, b. Jan. 29, 1872, d. June 7, 1873, in Chicago, 
111., a?. 4 mo. 

1959. v. Franklin Babcock Greene, b. May 28, 1873, in Chicago, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1953. iii. Caroline Josephine Greene, eldest dau. and 
third child of Joseph H. and Caroline A. Babcock Greene, and 
granddaughter of Mary Childs and Eufus Babcock, b. in Boston, 
March 24, 1842, m. Sept. 17, 1862, in Melrose, Mass., Henry 
A. Leonard, of Taunton, Mass. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

1960. i. Henry Franklin Leonard, b. July 10, 1863, in Melrose, Mass. 

1961. ii. Caroline May Leonard, b. Aug. 22, 1865, in Melrose, Mass. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

1954. iv. Mary A. Greene, second dau. and fourth child of 

Joseph H. and Caroline A. Babcock Greene, and granddaughter 

of Mary Childs and Rufus Babcock, b. in Boston, Mass. Oct. 

10, 1846, m. in Melrose, Mass., Sept. 3, 1868, Dr. Joseph Heber 

Smith. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

1962. i. Arline Smith, b. Dec. 3, 1871, in Melrose, Mass. 

1963. ii. Conrad Smith, b. Oct. 27, 1873, in Melrose, Mass. 



• AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 298 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1 785. v. Edward Child, fifth and youngest child of Edward 
and Margaret Weld Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Sept. 13, 1721, 
m. abt. 175(_), a Mrs. Perrin, mother of Augustin Perrin. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children : 

1964. i. Sarah Child, b. May 19, 1746, m. by Rev. Mr. Adams, Jan. 20, 
1771, James Wheaton. 

1965. ii. Rachel. Child, b. Aug. 28, 1752, m. by Rev. Win. Gordon, June 
13, 1776, Payson Williams. 

[Third Generation.] 

18. iv. Grace Child, fourth child and eldest dau. of Ben- 
jamin and Grace Morris Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Oct. 27, 
16S9, m. May 14, 1713, Timothy Walker, of Eehoboth, Mass., 
who was the son of Samuel and Martha Ide Walker, b. Sep. 14, 
1687. ' Mrs. Grace Child Walker was admitted to the church 
14th June, 1724, her death occurred about, five years later, 
30th Oct. 1729. Mr. Walker was a man of influence in the 
community, and of wealth for that period ; he re-married 30th 
Jan., 1730, Miss Rachel Beverly. 
[Fourth Generation] Children: 

1966. i. Elizabeth Walker, b. April 26, 1714, m. March 12, 1740, Jasiel 
Perry, Jr. 

1967. ii. Martha Walker, b. April 22, 1716, d. May 1, 1733. 

1968. iii. Timothy Walker, b. July 25, 1718, m. Dec. 10, 1841, Eliza- 
beth Carpenter. 

1969. iv. Huldah Walker, b. Jan. 19, 1721, m. Oct. 25, 1742, Josiah 
Carpenter. 

1970. v. Alathea Walker, b. Dec, 1724, m. Aug. 14, 1746, James 
Dexter. 

1971. vi. Eunice Walker, b. Sept. 4, 1728, m. May 11, 1749, James Hill. 

1972. vii. Martha Walker, 2d, b. Feb. 17, 1739, m. Stephen Hastings. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1966. i. Elizabeth Walker, eldest child of Grace Child 
and Timothy Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., April 26, 1714, m. 
March 12, 1740, Jasiel Perry, Jr., son of Jasiel and Rebecca 
Perry. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1973. i. Rebecca Perry, b. Sept. 4, 1742, d. young, in Rehoboth, Mass. 

1974. ii. Timothy Perry, b. Aug. 3, 1744, m. Huldah Hill, of Attleboro, 
Mass. Had three children. 

1975. iii. Rebecca Perry, 2d, b. Aug. 5, 1746, bapt. as Mehitable. 

1976. iv. Stephen Perry, b. May 4, 1751. 

1 The record of Grace Child who married Timothy Walker and that of her 
sister Mary Child, who married Peter Walker is largely obtained from "The 
Walker's of the Old Colony and their Descendants." 



294 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1977. v. Jasiel Perry, Jr., b. June 15, 1753, m. Betsey . Had 

eight children. 

1978. vi. Elizabeth Perry, b. Dec. 16, 1755. 

1979. vii. Grace Perry, b. April 7, 1758. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1968. iii. Col. Timothy Walker, eldest son and third child 
of Grace Child and Timothy Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., 
July 26, 1718, in. Dec. 10, 1741, Elizabeth Carpenter, dau. of 
Ebenezer Carpenter, of Attleboro, Mass. She was b. April 21, 
1720. She d. July 2, 1780. Mr. Walker m. 2d, Mrs. Patience 

. Col. Walker was a soldier of the Revolution. He was 

chosen as selectman of Rehoboth, represented the town in the 
General Court of Massachusetts, and was a delegate to the Pro- 
vincial Congress 1774-5. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1980. i. Lkpiia Walker, 1). Aug. 4, 1743, in. April 16, 1761, John Perry. 
Had six children. 

1981. ii. Sarah Walker, b. July 14, 1745, m. May 21, 1766, John 
Bishop. Had five children. 

1982. iii. Betty Walker, b. April 8, 1747, d. unm. 

1983. iv. Lydia Walker, b. May 1, 1749, m. Nov. 16, 1767, Amos Read. 

1984. v. Timothy Walker, b. May 22, 1751, m. June 2, 1774, Molly 
Wilmarth, who had seven children, d. Sept. 7, 1791; in. 2d, July 11, 1793, 
Lucy Redway, who had seven children. 

1985. vi. Huldah Walkeh, b. April 29, 1755, m. 1791, Joseph Chaffer. 
Had four children. 

1986. vii. Martha Walker, b. June 12, 1758, in. Feb. 3, 1780, John 
Davis. Had nine children. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1969. iv. Huldah Walker, third dau. and fourth child of 
Grace Child and Timothy Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., Jan. 
19, 1721, m. Oct. 25, 1742, Josiah Carpenter, son of Obadiah 
Carpenter. Resided in Cumberland, R, I. She d. in 1747. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1987. i. Cyril Carpenter, b. Aug. 27, 1743, m. Nov. 28, 1765, Lucy 
Lang or Lane. Had eleven children. 

1988. ii. Josiah Carpenter, b. Jan. 5, 1747, m. Sept. 21, 1769, Hepsi- 
beth Wilmarth. Had five children. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1970. v. Alathea Walker, fourth dau. and fifth child of 
Grace Child and Timothy Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., Dec, 
1724, m. Aug. 14, 1746, James Dexter, of Attleboro, Mass. Re- 
sided in Cumberland, R, I. 



. AND HIS DESCENDANTS. . 295 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

1989. i. Hopestill Dexter, b. about 1747, m. Benjamin May: had seven 
children. 

1990. ii. James Dexter, in. Rebecca Wheeler. 

1991. iii. Huldith Dexter, m. 1st, Stephen Brown; m 2d, Mr. Follett. 

1992. iv. Oliver Dexter. 

199;'». v. Mercy Dexter, m. Benjamin Wolcott. 

1994. vi. Simeon Dexter, d. unmarried. 

1995. vii. Esee Dexter, m. Margaret Coleman 
199G. viii. Benjamin Dexter, in. Mary Dexter. 

1997. ix. Nancy Dexter, m. Jeremiah Whipple. 

1998. x. Alathea Dexter, d. unmarried. 

1999. xi. Lucina Dexter, m. Dea. John Dexter 

2000. xii. Timothy Dexter, m. Sarah Messenger. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

1971. vi. Eunice Walker, fifth dau. and sixth child of 
Grace Child and Timothy Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., 
Sept. 4, 1728, m. May 11, 174-9, James Hill, a man remarkable 
for his integrity and punctuality. Mrs. Hill d. Dec. 31, 1772- 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2001. i. Barbara Hill. d. unmarried in Rehoboth, Mass. 

2002. ii. Phcebe Hill, d unmarried in Rehoboth, Mass. 

2003. iii. Eunice Hill, d. unmarried in Rehoboth, Mass. 

2004. iv. James Hill, Jr., in. Freelove Andrews; had six children. 

2005. v. Hannah Hill, m. Jonathan Haves; had nine children. 

2006. vi. John Hill, m. Mehitable Walker: resided in Clarendon, Vt. 

2007. vii. Cynthia Hill, m. Asa Angell; resided in New Berlin. N. Y. 
2008 viii. Sarah Hill, m. John Larned; resided in Clarendon, Vt. 

2009. ix. Daniel Hill, m. Sarah Hutchins; resided in New York and 
had several children. 

2010. x. Lucy Hill, m. David Hill; had two children. 

[Third Generation.] 

19. v. Mary Child, second dau. and fifth child of Benja- 
min and Grace Morris Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Oct. 25, 
17'. U, m. Jan. 9, 1715, Peter Walker, who was b. Sept. 18, 
16S9, a son of Samuel and Martha Ide Walker. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walker were admitted to communion Oct. 10, 1724. Mrs. Mary 
Child Walker d. between 1730 and '32. Mr. Walker was twice 
married after — 2d m. Jan. 18, 1733, Mrs. Martha Read ; 3d m. 

Bethiah . At his death his inventory amounted to £238. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

2011. i. Mary Walker, b. Aug., 1716, m. March 9, 1737, Daniel Perry. 

2012. ii. Samuel Walker, b. July 14, 1718, m., had 1 son, 1 

d. before 1746. I Twins. 

2013. iii. Peter Walker; Jr., b. July 14, 1718, m. Hannah | 
Fuller, of Willington, Ct.; had six children. J 



296 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2014. iv. Patience Walker, b. April 27, 1720, d. July 19, 1744. 

2015. v. John Walker, b. Oct. 3, 1721, m. Molly . 

2016. vi. Hannah Walker, b. March 6, 1723, m. John Peck. 

2017. vii. Grace Walker, ) „, . (, ^ 1( 100) -, r. ., irm . 

2018. viii. Esther Walker, \ ^ wms ' \ b - Dec - 14 > 1734 ' d - Dec " i4 > 1734 - 

2019. ix. Moses Walker, b. Nov. 2, 1725, d. Nov. 21, 1725. 

2020. x. Moses Walker, 2d, b. Oct. 5, 1726, m. March 15, 1753, Sarah 
Bowen, who d. March or May 3, 1768; m. 2d. March 2, 1769, Deliverance 
Carpenter Read; m. 3d, Mrs. Jemima Walker Bishop. 

2021. xi. Aaron Walker, b. Oct. 19, 1728, m. Jan. 30, 1755, Esther 
Carpenter; m. 2d, Dec. 22, 1763, Huldah Whittaker. 

2022. xii. Grace Walkek, b. Dec. 28, i730. 

2023. xiii. Ephraim Walker, b. Dec. 1, 1736, m. Dec. 26, 1771, Leaffe 
Ide. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2011. i. Mary Walker, eldest child of Mary Child and 
Peter Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., August 1716, m. March 
9, 1737, Daniel Perry of Rehoboth. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2024. i. Daniel Perry, Jr., b. Jan. 15, 1739. 

2025. ii. Ezra Perry, b. May 22, 1741. 

2026. iii. Noah Perry, b. Oct. 3. 1743. 

2027. iv. Mary Perry, b. Aug. 5, 1745. 

2028. v. Daniel Perry, b. April 3, 1748. 

2029. vi. Lydia Perry, b. April 30, 1750. 

2030. vii. Elijah Perry, b. Nov. 19, 1752. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2013. iii. Peter Walker, Jr., second son and third child 
of Mary Child and Peter Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., July 
14, 1718, m. Hannah Fuller of Willington, Ct.; resided in Ash- 
ford, Ct. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children : 

2031. i. Samuel Walker, b. Sept. 2, 1748, m. Alice Case; had eleven 
children. 

2032. ii. Peter Walker, b. 1760, m. Sally Carpenter; had three chil- 
dren. 

2033. iii. Mary Walker, m. David Tuttle; had six children. 

2034. iv. Sarah Walker, m. Jonathan Peck; resided in Randolph, Vt. 

2035. v. Hannah Walker, m. Ebenezer Cross ; resided in Canada. 

2036. vi. Grace Walker, m. Levi Wakefield ; six children, resided in 
Stafford, Ct. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2015. v. John Walker, third son and fifth child of Mary 
Child and Peter Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., Oct. 3, 1721, 

m. Molly about 1751. He was a "Capt. and Gent." in 

1788 ; and a noted man in Rehoboth, sergeant of the Minute 



A XI) HIS DESCENDANTS. 297 

Men in Lexington alarm, from Rehoboth, and saw service in 

the Revolution. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2037. i. John Walker, Jr. b. Nov. 1, 1752, d. unmarried, 1832. 

2038. ii. Calvin Walker, b. Jan. 5. 1754, m. Feb. 10, 1780, Phoebe 
Cole: had eight children. 

2039. iii. Molly Walker, b. Dec. 6, 175(1, m. Sept. 22, 17—, Caleb 
Ormsbee of Providence, R. I. 

2040. iv. Peter Walker, b. March 29, 1759: sailed from Providence 
and never again heard from. 

2041. v. Joseph Walker. 1>. Feb. 24, 1761, m. Dec. 3, 1784, Sarah Lane; 
resided in Nelson, N. Y.; eight children. 

2042. vi. Amy Walker, b. Feb. 24, 1762, d. young. 

2043. vii. Elizabeth Walker, b. Feb. 27, 1763, d. in early womanhood. 

2044. viii. Luther Walker, b. Jan. 7, 17(16, in. Mary Weaver, dan. of 
i apt. Lewis Weaver of Lansingburgh, N. Y. : had five children. Resided 
at one time in Troy, N. Y , and while there he built for himself the first 
two-story house in Troy. 

2045. ix. Lydia Walker, b. Feb. 10, 1768, m. Ang 30, 1796, Nathaniel 
Croade of North Providence, R. I. 

2046. x. George Whitefield Walker, b. Feb. 7, 1770, m. April 14, 
1796. Mehitable Bucklin; had eight children. 

2047. xi. Bosworth Walker, b. March 1, 1773, m. Feb. 9, 1802, Eliza- 
beth Weaver, dan. of Capt. Lewis Weaver; had seven children. 

2048. xii. William Walker, b. March 27, 1775, d. in infancy. 

2049. xiii. Elijah Walker, b. Feb. 10, 1777, d. in youth. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2019. x. Lieut. Moses Walker, fifth son and tenth child 
of Mary Child and Peter Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., Oct. 
5, 1726. He was three times married — 1st, March 15, 1753, 
Sarah Bovven, daughter of Peter and Susannah Bowen, she d. 
in 1768; m. 2d, Mch. 2, 1769, Deliverance Carpenter Read, 
she d. Mch. 20, 1789 : m. 3d, Mrs. Jemima Walker Bishop. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children : 

2050. i. Susannah Walker, b. Jnly 1, 1754, m. David Bliss; three 
children. 

2051. ii. Huldah Walker, b. Sept. 20, 1756, ra. Feb. 15, 1785, Isaac 
Brown ; resided in Barnet, Vt. ; seven children. 

2052. iii. Moses Walker, b. Dec. 16, 1760, m. 1st, April 10, 1783, Anna 
Brown; m. 2d, Aug. 14, 1787, Mary Whittaker; m. 3d, 1790, Hannah 
Carpenter. 

2053. iv. Sarah Walker, b. June 13, 1763, m. Ebenezer French; re- 
sided in Halifax, Vt. 

2054. v. Ethel Walker, b. Aug. 28, 1769, m. Nov. 25, 1795, Susannah 
Carpenter. He d. in Webster, Mich., " not of age but of medicine." says his 
son, who is an M. D.; had eleven children. 

W 



298 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2055. vi. Benjamin Walker, b. Oct. 19, 1770, in. Nov. 22, 1801, Su- 
sannah Bullock. He was farmer, selectman, lister, justice of the peace and 
representative to state legislature ; resided in Lyndon, Vt. ; had 4 children 

2056. vii. Aakon Walker, b. Jan. 9, 1776, m. 1800, Betsey Hoffman, 
who d. Oct. 18. 1826; m 2d, Feb. 25, 1827, Mrs. Sally Gould Leman. "He 
was first a Methodist, second of United Brethren, third a Cumberland Pres- 
byterian, fourth a Dunkard, and fifth a Baptist." Had twelve children. 

2057. viii. Dille or Delia Walker, b. Aug. 21, 1772, m. April 7, 1803, 
Henry Hoffman ; resided in Vermont ; three children. 

2058. ix. Lucy Walker, b. April 3, 1774, m. Feb. 26. 1793, Abel Wil- 
marth ; five children. 

2059. x. Hannah Walker, b. Dec. 23, 1777, d. before 1806. 

2060. xi. Ezra Walker, b. Oct. 28, 1780, m. 1st, Martha Blanding, who 
d. Sept. 1, 1816; m. 2d, Dec 1, 1819, Mary Robinson; resided in Attleboro, 
Mass. ; had eleven children. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2021. xi. Lieut. Aaron Walker, sixth son and eleventh 
child of Mary Child and Peter Walker, b. in Rehoboth, Mass., 
Oct. 19, 1728, m. 1st, Jan. 30, 1755, Esther Carpenter, dau. of 
Abiah and Experience Carpenter, she d. June 16, 1763; m. 
2d, Dec. 22, 1763, Huldali Whittaker, dau. of Israel and Mar- 
garet W. He d. in Roxbury, at the siege of Boston, of camp- 
fever. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2061. i. Patience Walker, b. Mch. 21, 1756, m. July 30, 1778, Ezra 
Reed ; resided in Langdon, N. H. ; had five children. 

2062. ii. Hannah Walker, b. Mch. 7, 1758, m. May 29, 1777, Elkanah 
French ; had eleven children. 

2063. iii. abiah Walker, b. Mch. 2, 1760, d. unmarried about 1.830. 

2064. iv. Samuel Walker, b. Feb. 4, 1762, m. 1784, Anna Carpenter; 
had five children. 

2065. v. Esther Walker, b. Oct. 27, 1764, m. July 1, 1790, John 
White; six children. 

2066 vi. Walter Walker, b. Nov. 16, 1766, m. June 11, 1801, Grace 
Loomis ; resided in Clarendon, Vt. ; had seven children. 

2067. vii. Relief Walker, b June 25, 1769, m. Mch. 9, 1793, Otis 
Walcott; resided in Pawtucket, R. I.; seven children. 

2068. viii. Nancy Walker, b. July 19, 1771, m. Dec. 30, 1793, George 
Sweetland of Attleboro, Mass.; two children. 

2069. ix. Pamelia Walker, b. Nov. 22, 1773, m. Sept. 27, 1796, 
Joseph Baker; resided in Providence, R. I.; seven children. 

[Third Generation.] 

20. vi. Ebenezer Child, sixth child of Benjamin, Jr., 
and Grace Morris Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Sept. 7, 1693, 
m. Elizabeth Bacon about 1720. Mr. Child left the Roxbury 
home and settled in the township then called New Roxbury, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. •J'.' 1 .' 

later Woodstock — a colony of Massachusetts, till the change of 
boundary line gave the town to the State of Connecticut, here 
Lieut. Child resided many years. When his son, Ebenezer, 
wished to remove to Vermont, he was found ready to encoun- 
ter anew the discomforts and rigors of pioneer life. Lieut. 
Child was a man of energetic, resolute firmness, but with a 
mostjtrue affection. His death occurred in 1773, at Union, 
Orange Co., Vt. Mrs. Elizabeth Bacon Child d. Nov. 30, 
176s. 

[Fourth Generation.! Children: 
2070 i Obadiah Child, b. in Woodstock, Aug. 30, 1721, d. Dec. 3, 1722. 

2071. ii. Elizabeth Child, b. in Woodstock, May 3, 1723, d. Jan. 20, 
1742. 

2072. iii. Susanna Child, 1 b. in Woodstock, Mch. 24, 1725, "published 
in bans of matrimony," April 10, 1744, to John Xewell. m. Dec. 30, 1756, 
Peter Child. (JRecord with Peter Child, page 240.) 

2073. iv. Ebenezer Child, Jr., b. in Woodstock, April 17, 1732, m. 1st 
1754, Charity Bugbee: m. 2d, 1775, Alice Cobb 

2074. v. Mary Child, b. in Woodstock, Feb. 24, 1733, m. Col. Freeman 
of Sturbridge, Mass. 

2075. vi. Keziah Child, b. in Woodstock, Feb. 18, 1734, m. June 20, 
1754, John Bacon. 

2076. vii. Hannah Child, b. in Woodstock, Jan. 12, 1735, m. June 17, 
1752, Japheth Bicknell. 

2077. viii. Jemima Child, b. in Woodstock, Feb. 12, 1736, m. 1764, 
Benjamin Freeman. 

2078. ix. Deborah Child, b. in Woodstock, Oct, 27, 1738. 

2079. x. Obadiah Child, 2d., b. in Woodstock, Oct. 23, 1740, unm. 

2080. xi. Margaret Child, b. , d. July 15, 1742. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2073. iv. Ebenezer Child, Jr., second son and fourth 
child of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Bacon Child, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct, (then called New Eoxbury, Mass.,) April 17, 1732. Mr. 
Child was twice married — first in 1754 to Miss Charity Bug- 
bee, who was b. in Woodstock in 1728, was the mother of his 
children, and a woman of most lovely character. A son writes 
of her, " she died as she had lived, a meek and humble chris- 
tian, Dec. 20, 1772 ; she was courteous to servants, and one in 
whom the poor found a friend, and the needy was rarely sent 
empty away." The same son writes of the second mother, 
Alice Cobb, who m. Mr. Ebenezer Child, Jr., in 1775, as a 
most kind parent and lovely woman. 

1 This Susan Child who married Peter was erroneously stated to have been 
daughter of Nathaniel Child. 



300 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBURY, MASS. 

Mr. Ebenezer Child, Jr., was a man of indomitable will and 
when, by any stress of circumstances, diverted from the pur- 
suit of his regular business, he immediately turned to the best 
work offering. So we find him on the first winter after his re- 
moval to Leicester, Vt, when the rigors of the northern winters 
prevented further toil upon his farm, teaching in Kutland, Vt. 
The farm he had chosen was wholly unredeemed, and the cut- 
ting of large forest trees, with the sturdy strokes of the axe, 
was an initiative step to open the soil to the sun before any 
crops could be looked for. The trees felled, a primitive plow- 
ing around the thick-standing stumps made ready the ground 
for corn and wheat. Patriotic also, he was engaged in 
the warfare, which darkened the early years of the colonies. 
He served in the French war under Generals Putnam and 
Durkee. The severities of exposure and labor proved too vio- 
lent, and Mr. Child succumbed to an inflammatory fever and 
died in the town of Leicester, Addison Co., Vt., June 7, 1791 ; 
he had been received into the communion of the church in 1740. 
Upon the organization of the town, he had been chosen its first 
town clerk. Mrs. Alice Cobb Child d. Mch. 22, 1801. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children : 

2081. i. Sophia Child, b. Mch. 7, 1755, m. Simon Wright. 

2082. ii. Penuel Child, b. Mch. 7, 1757, in. 1st, Oct. 11, 1780, Charlotte 
Loomis; in. 2d, Oct. 22, 1815, Mrs. Sabra Henry. 

2083. iii. Perley Child, b. Dec. 6, 1759, in. Lucy Symons. 

2084. iv. Ebenezer Child, b. Nov. 12, 176 3, d. Aug. 3, 1768, in Wood- 
stock, Ct. 

2085. v. Bethiah Child, b. June 22, 1765, d. Sept. 2, 1768, in Wood- 
stock, Ct. 

2086. vi. Elizabeth Child, b. Dec. 29, 1767, in. Abner Brigham. 

2087. vii. Ebenezer Child, 2d, b. Aug. 7, 1770, m. Dec. 6, 1792, Anna 
Grey. 

[Fifth Generation. J 

2081. i. Sophia Child, eldest dau. and child of Ebenezer, 

Jr., and Charity Bugbee Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Mch. 7, 

1755, m. abt. 1774, Simon Wright. Mr. Wright was b. Feb. 

27, 1754, and d. Jan. 1, 1808. Mrs. Sophia Wright d. July 

12, 1819. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2088. i. Gardner Wright, b. Mar. 17, 1775, m. Mch. 28, 1797, Jemima 
Rice. 

2089. ii. Charity Wright, b. Nov. 13, 1777, d. Dec. 20, 1803. 

2090. iii. Polly Wright, b. Sept. 16, 1780, d. June 12, 1818. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 301 

2091. iv. Elizabeth Wright, b. Mch. 16, 1783, d. May 28, 1840. 

2092. v. Nancy Wright, b. Aug. 7, 1785, ,1 Sept. L839. 

2093. vi. John Wright, b. Aug. 19, 1788. 

2094. vii. Loyal Wright, b. Doc. 25, 1791. 

2095. viii. Walter S. Wright, b. Aug. 3, 1794. '1 Aug 1829. 

2096. ix. Danford Wright, b. April 1. 1797. 

2097. x. Simeon Wright, b. June 8, 1809. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2088. i. Gardner Wright, eldest sou and child of Sophia 

Child and Simeon Wright, b. in Vermont, Mch. 17. 177"), m. 

Mch. 28, 1707, Jemima Rice. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2098 i. Joseph W. Wright, b. May 18, 1798. Reside-, in Kalamazoo, 
Mich 

2099 ii. Julia M. Wright, b Mch. 16, 1800, d. Mch. 16, 1825. 
310(1 iii. Alfred Wright, b. Mch. 8. 1802. 

2101. iv Charity Wright, b. Jan 3, 1804. d. Feb. 21. 1841. 
2102 v. Betsey Wright, b. Nov. 20. 1806. in. Mr. Knowlton, of Bran- 
don, Vt. 

2103. vi. Sophia Child Wright, b. Mch. 13, 1810 

2104. vii. William B. Wright, b. Nov. 26, 1814. d. Oct. 25, 1848. 

2105. viii. George W. Wright, b Jan. 17, 1817, d. April 15, 1849. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2088. ii. Penuel Child, eldest son and second child of 
Ebenezer and Charity Bugbee Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
May 8, 1757, m. Oct. 11, 1780, Miss Charlotte Loomis. 

While quite a young man, rilled with energy and cheerful 
acceptance of toil and trouble, and delight in conquered obsta- 
cles, Mr. Child with his young wife found a home in the Green 
Mountain State, and there set up his penates. Mrs. Charlotte 
Loomis Child died in Brandon, Vt., Jan. 11, 1815^at the age 
of fifty. Mr. Child married second on the 22d October, 1815, 
Mrs. Sabra Cannon Henry, widow of Daniel Henry, of Bran- 
don, Vt., and adopted daughter of Mary Winslow, all origi- 
nally from Hardwick, Mass. Mrs. Sabra C. H. Child died at the 
home of Penuel Child, Jr. in Pittsrield, Vt, on the 7th March, 
1 855. Mr. Child died in the same, place August 22, 1843, se. 87. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2106. i. Ralpha Rodolpha Child, b. in Union. Ct.. Feb. 12, 1782, in. 
Nov. 27. 1805, Hannah Demming. 

2107. ii. John Burnap Child, b. in Union, Ct.. June 25, 1786, in. Mch. 
6, 1808, Polly Ganson. 

2108. iii. Frederick Augustus Child, b. Dec. 11, 1788, m. Mch. 28, 
1818, Charlotte Sessions. 



302 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2109. iv. Penurl Child, Jr., b. May 9, 1794, m. Mch. 10, 1824, Mary 
Henry. 

2110. v. Daniel Putnam Child, b. Jan. 12, 1803, d. Dec. 29, 1841, at 
Schoolcraft, Mich. 

2111. vi. Henry Loomis Child, b. Oct. 5, 1816, m. D. B. Hale, of Mid- 
dlebury, Vt. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2106. i. Kalpha Kodolpha Child, eldest son and child of 
Penuel and Charlotte Loomis Child, b. in Union, Ct, Feb. 11, 
1782, m. Nov. 27, 1S05, Hannah Demming, dau. of Jonathan 
Demming. She was b. Jan. 13, 1786, in Goshen, Mass. Mr. 
E. R. Child d. April 22, 1824. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2112. i. Charlotte Child, b. May 9, 1807, m. Samuel Granger. 

2113. ii. James McCluer Child, b. Mch. 31, 1809, m. Miss White, of 
Watertown, N. Y. 

2114. iii. Emilia Child, b. May 24, 1811, m. James Brainard, of Wey- 
bridge, Vt. 

2115. iv. John [Schuyler Child, b. Sept. 19, 1813. 

2116. v. Luther Demming Child, b. Mch. 5, 1816. 

2117. vi. Henry Rodolphus Child, b. Oct. 3, 1822; a very bright and 
lovely young man, who died in early manhood, at the house of his sister, 
Mrs. C. C. Granger, Castleton, Vt. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2107. ii. John Burnap Child, second son and child of 
Penuel and Charlotte Loomis Child, b. in Union, Ct., June 25, 
178ti, m. Mch. 6, 1808. Polly Ganson. He d. in PittsfieklVt., 
Nov. 23, 1840. Mrs. P. G. Child d. in Brandon, Vt, Feb. 1, 
1822. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2118. i. Cherry Child, b. June 11, 1808, ra. Simeon Bigelow. 

2119. ii. M#ry Child, b. July 4, 1810, m. Royal D. Far. 

2120. iii. John Jay Child, b. Aug. 12, 1814, m. Mary Smith. 

2121. iv. Joseph Putnam Child, b. Aug. 12, 1815, m. May 12, 1844, 
Mary Ann Smith. 

2122. v. Martha Gekaldine Child, b. Aug. 29, 1818, m. Freeman 
Mathews. 

2123. vi. Penuel Ganson Child, b. Dec. 17, 1821. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2121. iv. Joseph Putnam Childs, second son and fourth 
child of John Burnap and Polly Ganson Child, b. in Pittsfield, 
Vt, Aug. 12, 1815, m. May 12, 1844, Mary Ann Smith, dau- 
of Robert Smith, of Bellingham, Mass. Mr. Childs is a florist 
Residence, Woonsocket, R. I. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 303 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2124. i. Maktiia Evaline Childs, b. Nov. 12, 1845, d. Jan 9, 1849. 

2125. ii. Ida Evaline Childs, b. Mch. 21, 1850, d. Dee. 2<i. 1856. 
2120. iii. Frank Allen Childs, b. Nov. 7. 1851, in. Nov. 4. 1ST5, Mary 

E. Ballon. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2126. iii. Frank Allen Childs, only son of Joseph P. and 
Mary A. Smith Childs, b. Nov. 7, 1851, m. Nov. 4, 1875, 
Mary E. Ballon, dau. of Levi T. Ballon, of Cumberland, B. I. 
Reside in Woonsocket, R. I. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2127. i. Bertha Eloise Childs, b. Nov. 25, 1876. 

2128. ii. Frank Howard Childs, b. April 12, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2108. iii. Frederick Augustus Child, third son and child 
of Penuel and Charlotte Loomis Child, b. in Union, Tolland 
Co., Ct., Dec. 11, 1789, m. Mch. 28, 1818, Miss Charlotte Ses- 
sions, dau. of Walter and Anna Loomis Sessions. Mrs. Char- 
lotte S. Child, b. in Union, Ct., Feb. 21, 1795, d. Oct. 3, 1875. 
Mr. F. A. Child d. Feb. 21, 1860, in Brandon, Rutland Co., 
Vt., where his home had been for many years. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2129. i. Caroline Frances Gulnare Child, b. Oct. 18, 1818, m. Mch. 
5, 1840, Moses J. Enos. 

2180. ii. An infant, unchristened, b. 1820. 

2131. iii. Charlotte Child, b. Feb. 3, 1822, d. ?e. three years in Middle 
bury, Vt. 

2132. iv. Helen Maria Child, b. Aug. 22, 1823, m. Aug. 3, 1843, Har- 
rison Ward. 

2133. v. Antoinette Madaline Child, b. June 3, 1825; resides in 
Forestdale, Rutland Co., Vt. ; teacher. 

2134. vi. Adeliza C. Child, b. July 1, 1828, ra. Feb. 25, 1847, John 
Capen. 

2135. vii. Harry G. Child, b. April 30, 1830, m. May 12, 1852, Juliette 
C Allen. 

2136. viii. Augusta A. Child, b. Jan. 29, 1832, m. Oct. 10, 1854, Major 
Freeman Allen. 

2137. ix. Sabrina A. Child, b. Oct. 28, 1834, d. Aug. 1, 1852, in Bran- 
don, Vt. 

2138. x. George Carroll Child, b. Feb. 8, 1837, unm. ; resides in 
Forestdale, Rutland Co., Vt. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2129. i. Caroline Frances Gulnare Child, eldest child 
of Frederick Augustus and Charlotte Sessions Child, b. in 
Brandon, Vt., Oct. 18, 1818, m. Mch. 5, 1840, Moses J. Enos, 



304 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

who d. in Eagle, Wisconsin, Moh. 9, 1877. Mr. Enos was a 
native of Leicester, Addison Co., Vt., where he was b. Feb. 13, 
1799. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2139. i. Frances A. Enos, b. Feb. 10, 1841, at Leicester, Vt.. d. Sept. 
13, 1844, at Eagle, Wis. 

2140. ii Clarence H. Enos, b. Nov. 28, 1845, d. Dee. 24, 1854, at 
Eagle, Wis. 

2141. iii. Addie Enos, b. May 6, 1851, m. Oct. 5, 1871, S. De Witt 
Wilbur. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2141. iii. Addie Enos, third child and second dau. of Caro- 
line F. G. Child and Moses J. Enos, b. at Eagle, Waukesha Co., 
Wis., May 6, 1851, m. Oct. 5, 1871, S. De Witt Wilbur, who 
was b. at Palmyra, Jefferson Co., Wis., July 5, 1854. Eesidence 
Eagle, Wis. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

2142. i. Evelyn Bell Wilbur, b. Aug. 20, 1872, at Eagle, Wis. 

2143. ii. Pearl May Wilbur, b. Nov. 14, 1875, at Eagle, Wis. 

2144. iii. Minnie Daisy Wilbur, b. Jan 1, 1879, at Eagle. Wis. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2132. iv. Helen Maria. Child, fourth dau. and child of 
Frederick Augustus and Charlotte Sessions Child, b. in Salis- 
bury, Addison Co., Vt,, Aug. 22, 1823, m. Aug. 3, 1843, Har- 
rison Ward, who was b. Dec. 18, 1812, and d. near Fort 
Elliott, Texas. Jan. 8, 1S79. Their residence was in Wau- 
kesha, Wis., and Mrs. Helen M. Child Ward is yet a resident 

of Waukesha. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2145. i. Herman Melancthon Ward, b. Jan. 5, 1845, in Eagle. Wau- 
kesha Co., Wis.: m. and resides in Oakland, Cal. 

2146. ii. Ida Helen Ward. b. Feb. 25, 1848, in. May 13. 1867. J. B. 
Curtiss. 

2147. iii. Frederick Augustus Ward, b. Mch. 21. 1850. in Eagle, 
Wis. : resides at Fort Elliott, Texas. 

2148. iv. Cassius Clay Ward, b. June 6, 1852, in Eagle, Wis.: resides 
in Waukesha, Wis. 

2149. v. Walter Capen Ward, b. Oct. 7, 1854, m. Hattie Meyers. 

2150. vi. Henry Beecher Ward, b. Feb. 11, 1857. in Waukesha, Wis., 
where he resides. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2140. ii. Ida Helen Ward, only dau. and second child of 
Helen M. Child and Harrison Ward, b. in Brandon, Vt, Feb. 
25, 1848, m. in Waukesha, Wis., May 13, 1867, John Barney 
Curtiss. Eesidence Chicago, 111. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 305 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2151. i. John Barney Curtisb, .Jit., b. Jan. 28, 1878, in Sun Francisco, 
Cal., d. Oct. 16, 1873. 

2152. ii. Helen Chandler Curtiss, b. Jan. 23, 1875, in San Francisco, 
Cal., (I Feb. 2, 1877. 

[Eighth Generation. | 

214H. v. Walter Capen Ward, fourth son and fifth child 
of Helen M. Child and Harrison Ward, b. in Eagle, Waukesha 
Co., Wis., Oct. 7, 1854, in. Hattie Meyers. Residence San 
Francisco, Cal. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2153. i. Infant unnamed. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2134. vi. Adeliza Charlotte Child, sixth dau. and child 
of Frederick Augustus and Charlotte Sessions Child, b. in 
Brandon, Vt, July 1, 1S2S, m. Feb. 25, 1847, Hon. John 
Capen, who was b. in Goshen, Vt., Mch. 23, 1818, and d. Jan. 
5, 1878, in Brandon, Vt, A sister-in-law writes of him, ; ' If 
ever a man was perfect in all his ways and habits he was, 
strictly honest and upright in all his dealings. His business 
was that of a lumber dealer and practical land surveyor. He 
was elected to fill the posts of town clerk, grand juryman and 
justice of the peace ; he also represented the town in the State 
Legislature several times, and was a member of the Vermont 
constitutional convention. He was in early years a successful 
and honored instructor." Mrs. A. C. Child Capen resides in 
Brandon, Vt. 

[Eighth Generation. ] Children : 

2154. i. Mary Charlotte Capen, b. Aug. 9, 1859, d. Aug. 11, 1859, in 
Goshen, Vt. 

2155. ii. John Bernard Capen, b. May 21, 1866, d. Sept. 23, 1866, in 
Brandon, Vt. 

2156. iii. Flavia Antoinette Capen, b. Aug. 11, 1867. 
[Seventh Generation.] 

2135. vii. Harry G. Child, eldest son and seventh child of 
Frederick Augustus and Charlotte Sessions Child, b. in Bran- 
don, Vt, April 30, 1830, m. May 12, 1852, Juliette C. Allen. 
Mr. Child removed soon after marriage to the West, is now a 
resident of Berlin, Green Lake Co., Wisconsin, and engaged in 
a large commercial business. 

[Eighth Generation ] Children : 

2157. i. Herbert W. Child, b. April 24, 1854, in Brandon, Vt, 

2158. ii. Hiram A. Child, b. Jan. 23, 1858, m. Jan. 13, 1878, Jennie M. 
Burr 



306 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2158. ii. Hiram A. Child, second son and child of Harry 
G. and Juliette C. Allen Child, b. in Kingston, Green Lake 
Co., Wis., Jan. 23, 1858, m. Jan. 13, 1»78, Jennie M. Bun- 
reside in Berlin, Wis. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2159. i. Harry Burr Child, b. Mch. 30. 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2136. viii. Augusta Alice Child, seventh dau. and eighth 
child of Frederick Augustus and Charlotte Sessions Child, b. 
in Brandon, Yt., Jan. 29, 1832, m. Oct. 10, 1851, Major Free- 
man Allen of Brandon, Yt., who was b. in Kochester, Windsor 
Co., Yt., Dec. 20, 1829. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2160. i. John Scott Anderson Allen, b. May 17, 1861, drowned Aug. 
21, 1872 in a freshet, which compelled the family to flee from their home, 
the boy was held by his father until exhaustion relaxed his hold, and his 
own life was nearly sacrificed. 

2161. ii. Lottie May Allen, b. Jan. 27. 1867, d. Dec. 13. 1878. Two 
more lovely and endearing children are rarely given to fond parents, and 
their early deaths have cast shadows beyond the home circle. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2109. iv. Penuel Child, Jr., fourth son and child of Penuel 
and Charlotte Loomis Child, b. in Union, Ct., May 9, 1794, m. 
Mch. 10, 1824, Miss Mary Henry, dau. of Daniel' Henry, of 
Brandon. Yt, Mr. Penuel Child, Jr., d. in Clinton, Wisconsin, 
Sept. 4, 1868. His widow resides in Edgarton, Wis. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2162. i. William Wallace Child, b. Nov. 11, 1824, in. April 25, 1848, 
Eluthra Caroline Harrison Hatch. 

2163. ii. Rolin Rodolphus Child, b. Oct. 21, 1827, m. May 25, 1854, 
Mariette Young. 

2164. iii. Mary Child, b. May 29, 1831, m. abt. 1859, R. R. Brown. 

2165. iv. Ellen Child, b. May 15, 1835, m. abt. 1856, H. B Belong. 

2166. v. A daughter— unchristened. 



'&' 



[Seventh Generation.] 

2162. i. William Wallace Child, eldest child of Penuel, 
Jr., and Mary Henry Child, b. in Brandon,Yt., Nov. 11, 1824, m. 
by the Kev. J. B. Clark, April 25, 1848, Eluthra Caroline Harri- 
son Hatch, who was b. in Pittsfield, Yt., Aug. 18, 1826, dau. 
of Orton and Pamelia Harrison Hatch. Resides at Edgerton, 
Rxlck Co.. Wisconsin. Is engaged in business as dealer and 
packer in leaf tobacco. 



AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. 307 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
2107. i. Florence Eltjthra Child, b. Sept. 24, 1849, at Eagle, Wis. 
21(58. ii. Harold Wallace Child, b. Nov. 16, 1851, at Eagle, Wis. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2163. ii. Bollix Podolphus Child, second child and son 
of Penuel, Jr., and Mary Henry Child, b. in Brandon, Vt.,Oct 
21, 1827, m. May 25, 1854, Mariette Young, of Lake Mills, Wis. 
Reside in Clinton, Rock Co., Wisconsin. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2169. i. Gkrtkude Mary Child, b. Sept. 27, 1855, d. young. 

2170. ii. Hubert Henry Child, b. April 4, 1857, in Albion, Wis. 

2171. iii. Charles Rolin Child, b Oct. 6, 1861, in Albion, Wis. 
2172- iv. Ellen Eltjthra Child, b. April 3, 1863. 

2173. y. Grace Evelyn Child, b. Feb. 1, 1867. 

2174. vi. Clifton Putnam Child, j i T . b A ^ m 
2175 vii. Clayton Penuel Child, j ° 

2176. viii Isora Mary Child, b. Mch. 15, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2 164-. iii. Mary Child, eldest dau. and third child of Penuel, 
and Marv Henry Child, b. in Pittsfield, Vt., May 29, 1831, m. 

R. R. Brown, abt. 1859. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2177. i. Penuel Child Brown, b. Sept. 11, 1860. 

2178. ii Wallace Schuyler Brown, b. Oct. 16, 1863. 

2179. iii. Mary Gertkude Brown, b. Jan. 12, 1868. 

2180. iv. George Richard Brown, b. Nov. 9, 1873. 

[Seventh Generation] 

2165. iv. Ellen Child, second dau. and fourth child of 
Penuel. Jr., and Mary Henry Child, b. in Pittsfield, Vt., May 
15, 1835, m. H. B. Delong, abt 1855. 
[Eighth Generation] 

2181. i Isora Mary DeLong, b. April 26, 1857. 
2182 ii. Lillian E. DeLong, b. Mch. 19, 1860. 
2183. iii. John Henry DeLong, b. Aug. 14, 1871. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2111. vi. Henry Loomis Child, youngest child of Penuel 
and Charlotte Loomis Child, b. in Brandon, Vt., Oct. 5, 1816, 
has been three times married — 1st, in 1839, Diadama Burt Hale, 
of Middlebury, Vt.; 2d, Katherine Winter; 3d, Dec. 26, 1844, 
Mary Helen Post. Resides in Troy, N. Y. Occupation, that 
of ship carpenter. 

Mr. Child in early manhood had a vigorous constitution, and 
a fondness for adventure not altogether free from hardships 
and exposure to danger. His love for hunting wild game led 



308 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

him to the Adirondac Mountains, where his winters for some 
years were spent hunting the deer and other wild animals 
abounding in those forests, making his mode of life an oppor- 
tunity for gain in the valuable furs and hides which he was 
able to bring to a paying market. Few were regarded as a 
better "shot" than Mr. Child. The vigor of former years has 
given place to infirmities which enfeeble his declining 3' ears. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2184. i. Orenna Child, b. 1840. 

2185. ii. Penuel Benjamin Child, b. 1842. 

2186. iii. Lucy Sabrina Child, b. Feb. 4, 1844, m. Mch. 27, 1864, Chas. 
Vayette. 

2187. iv. Daniel Henry Child, b. Feb. 27, 1846, m. Mary Webster. 

2188. v. Francis Marion Child, b. April 29, 1848, m. April 27, 1869, 
Sarah Breslin. 

2189. vi. William Wallace Child, b. 1860. 

2190. vii. Alice Katharine Child, b. 1865. 

2191. viii. Frederick Augustus Child, b. 1868. 

2192. ix. Charlotte Child, b. 1&70. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2186. iii. Lucy Sabrina Child, second dau. and third child 
of Henry Loomis and Diadama B. Hale Child, b. in Stock- 
bridge, Vt., Feb. 4, 1844, m. by the Eev. Lewis Derush, in 
Whitehall, K Y., Mch. 27, 1864, Charles Vayette, who was b. 
in Whitehall, N. Y, Aug. 18, 1836. Mr. Vayette is a truck- 
man by occupation, in Whitehall, 1ST. Y. 

[Eighth Generation ] Children : 

2193. i. Oraanna Vayette, b. Dec. 25, 1864. 

2194. ii. William Francis Vayette, b. Jan. 14, 1867, d. April, 1867. 

2195. iii. Charles Henry Vayette, b. July 8, 1869, d. same month. 

2196. iv. George Vayette, b. June 24, 1870, d. July 7. 1870. 

2197. v. Sarah Elizabeth Vayette, b. Mch. 25. 1871, d. May, 1871. 

2198. vi. William Vayette, b. Jan. 24, 1873, d. July, 1873. 

2199. vii. Augustus Vayette, b. Oct. 4, 1875. 

2200. viii. Edward Ellsworth Vayette, b. Dec. 2, 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2187. iv. Daniel Henry Child, second son and fourth 
child of Heniy Loomis and Diadama B. Hale Child, b. in Mid- 
dlebury,Vt., Feb. 27, 1846, m. Mary Webster, of East Pultney, 
Vt. Besides at Sutherland Falls, Rutland Co., Vt. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2201. i John Henry Child, b. 1869. 

2202. ii. Mary Child, b. 1873. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 309 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2188. v. Francis Marion Child, third son and fifth child 
of Henry Loomis and Diadama B. Hair Child, b. in Middle- 
bury, Vt., April 29, 1848. in. April 27, 1869, by the Rev J. J. 
McDonald, in Whitehall, N. Y., Sarah Breslin, who was b. in 
Hemingford, Canada East, July 23, 1847. Mr. F. M. Child 
when four years of age lost his mother, and went soon after to 
reside in Whitehall. He has been engaged in various kinds of 
business ; at twelve years of age began his care of himself. He 
has associated himself with his brother in-law, Charles Vayette, 
in business, and resides in Whitehall, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2203. i. Chari.es Francis Child, b. Mch. 2'S, INTO. 

2204. ii. Patrick Henry Child, b. May 16. 1872. 

2205. iii. William Albert Child, b. Jan. 6, 1870. 

2206. iv. Mary Agnes Child, b. July 26, 1878. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2083. iii. Perley Child, second son and third child of 
Ebenezer and Charity Bugbee Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
Dec. 6, 1859, in. Miss Lucy Symons. He d. May 30, 1812, in 
Pittsfield, Vt. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2207. i. Polly Child, in. Mr. Farnham. 

2208. ii. Sophia Child, m. Mr. Salisbury. 

2209. iii. Betsey Child, m Mr. Farnham. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2086. vi. Elizabeth Child, second dau. and sixth child of 
Ebenezer and Charity Bugbee Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
Dec. 29, 1767, m. Abner Brigham. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2210. i. Betsey Brigham. 

2211. ii. William Brigham. 

2212. iii. Sophia Brigham. 

2213. iv. Nancy Brigham. 

2214. v. Lucius Brigham. 

2215. vi. Louisa Brigham. 

2216. vii. Asa Brigham. 

2217. viii. Charles Brigham. 

2084. v. Ebenezer Child, fourth son and youngest child of 
Ebenezer and Charity Bngbee Child, b. in Union, Ct., Aug. 
17, 1770, m. at Brandon, Vt, Dec. 6, 1792, Miss Anna Gray, 
of Worcester, Mass. 



310 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Mr. Child had an inheritance of strong intellectual and moral 
qualities, and so far conquered all unpropitious surroundings 
as to make them contribute to the development of a strong 
mind, in a strong physical system. Early in life he was a 
puny boy, and always regarded much younger than he really 
was. When past ninety years of age, he writes most touch- 
ingly and tenderly of being lifted by his father to look upon 
the pale, silent face of the loving mother whose care he would 
never know, and of whom this act would prove the sole remem - 
brance ; he was then about three years old. The death of his 
mother, when he was so young, led to his being placed in the 
home of an elder married sister, with whom he remained until 
the second marriage of his father, and the family removed from 
Connecticut to Vermont, when he bravely shared the perils and 
-deprivations, toil and loneliness of a home in the sparsely set- 
tled Green Mountain State. After aiding his father to build their 
log-house and gather in the grain raised around the stumps of 
trees on their lately cleared land in the summer and autumn of 
their entrance into Vermont, in the late autumn he made his 
way on foot and alone, to the old home and friends in Con- 
necticut. He was then about twelve years old. With the dear 
kindred he spent the winter. Early spring found him on a 
rudely constructed vehicle, with the new mother, and their small 
household supplies, making his way amid cold and snow to 
Vermont. 

His father's death occurring a few years later, Mr. Ebenezer 
Child settled the estate and started a new farm for himself, to 
which he brought his young bride, with strong courage and 
manly pride to carve out his own fortunes, and rear a large 
family. For many years, till quite past the" threescore years 
and ten, his activities were laborious, continuous and efficient. 
The wonderful retention of the mental faculties until his death, 
when ninety-six years of age, help to prove that it is undue and 
extreme use which destroys. Mr. Ebenezer Child very early 
in life took such a decided and intelligent stand in the town- 
ship upon all questions, political, religious and social, as to 
render him a power for good, and a frequent recognition by his 
fellow townsmen in the bestowal of differing offices, attested 
their appreciation. At the age of seventy-one, we find him to 
have delivered an address at Pittsfleld, Vermont, on the for- 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 311 

mation of a Lyceum in thai town. For many years Mr. Child 
was a regular contributor to certain local newspapers of articles 
upon most of the leading topics of the day, ami as a1 this period, 
the differences of the Arminian and Calvinistic Creeds were 
deeplv moving the New England mind, Mr. Child was especi- 
ally interested and active in the discussions. The Masonic 
order found in him a friend and defender, and the growth and 
development of the young republic of the United States, awak- 
ened his deepest, heartiest enthusiasm. After passing into the 
four-score years some infirmities of body rendered locomotion 
more difficult and the amusements and occupations were limit- 
ed to the use of the pen and reading. Sizeable folios were filled 
with copied letters and manuscripts of his composition, as lega- 
cies for his fondly cherished grandchildren, towards whom he 
entertained the most lavish affection, in whose progress he took 
pride, and whose ambition he sought to kindle for noblest effort 
and attainment. One or two extracts from letters addressed to 
the grandsons, Don Alonzo and Chas. G. Child, of New York, 
will evince his own clear mind, and true interest in them. 
From a letter bearing date Sept. 25, 1865, we give a sketch of 
his daily life, which he says he furnishes them as they may not 
be able to understand how a man so aged could pass the day, 
(then being ninety five) : 

As a great poet has said — 

' Tis but one youth at most that mortals have, 
And one old age prepares us for the grave,' 
I retire at 7 o'clock p. «., and Morpheus soon locks up the sensitive 
organs in quiet and balmy slumbers, which I generally enjoy until some- 
thing like 4 o'clock a. m. I then return thanks to the great Author of my 
many blessings, and indulge half an hour in repeating and singing to my- 
self those old hymns and psalms I used to indulge in sixty or seventy years 
ago. I arise about 6 a. m., after dressing myself, by the aid of my staff 
with some bodily exertion walk the piazza, then return to my room, wash, 
take half or three-fourths of a wine-glass of bitters; by this time I hear the 
glad voice sounding, ' Breakfast ready, Father!' of which I partake heartily. 
The amusements of the day you know well, when you think of reading 
papers, writing, and scrap-book, etc. My vacant hours of late dwell much 
on moral and scientific subjects. As I see the first rays of morning light 
breaking forth from the East, I say, here is another incontestible evidence 
of the being of a Supreme Creator. Nothing less than Almighty power. 
which creates and governs a universe of eighty millions of worlds, could 
keep in order this inconceivably great and mysterious machine, whereby 
sun and moon, stars, comets and their satellites, move in such harmony for 
thousands of years without the least variation. 



3 1 2 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Again be writes — 

* * * The mind of man evidently designed for progressive im- 
provement, not to end with life, but to continue in another state of im- 
proved existence forever, if we continue to improve our intellectual facul- 
ties while living here on earth. Youth seems to be the favorable time for 
the cultivation and maturing of our moral and social natures, and ennob- 
ling faculties that will enable us to become worthy and respected members 
of society. Says a great and good man : ' The youth who cultivates his 
intellect and habitually obeys the precepts of Christianity, will in mature 
life enjoy within himself a fountain of moral and intellectual happiness, the 
appropriate reward of < bedience.' Man when viewed in one aspect resem- 
bles a demon, in another he bears the impress of the image of God. When 
seen in his crimes he might resemble a devil, when contemplated in his 
charities; his discoveries in science, his vast combinations for the benefit of 
his race, he appears a bright intelligence from heaven. I have illustrated 
these facts for your especial consideration that you may now in youlh 
profit by the comparison ; make choice and habitually pursue a course of 
life tending to refinement in mind and manners. 

In another letter he writes — 

November has been very mild and accommodating, though his hoarse 
and hollow breath betokens his sudden dissolution, then stem and gloomy 
December will usurp his iron rule and unrelenting winter follow in his 
train. These rough November blasts have already attacked this old. dilapi- 
dated and decaying tenement, that has endured the chill frosts of more 
than four score and ten winters and can make but feeble defence, and we 
are now fortifying a place for retreat during cold winter's unwelcome 
rigor, which will require a covering like the shield of Ajax, ' With seven 
thick folds o'er cast of tough bull's hide, and solid brass the last.' 
' But let chill winter bind the crystal streams, 
Withdraw from earth the sun's enlivening beams 
And scatter snow-flakes o'er the frozen sea, 
Thou canst not freeze the streams of true-eyed charity.' 

We close these extracts which might be much multiplied 

with his pleasant wishes for these grandsons, written them on 

the incoming of a New Year — 

May your happiness increase with your virtues, may generous hearts, 
true friendships, peaceful and happy firesides, be the reward of your labors 
of love, is the sincere desire of your old grandfather. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2218. i. Sallie Warner Child, b. Oct. 19, 1793, in Brandon, Vt., d. 
March, 1843, at Pittsfield, Vt ; unmarried. 

2219. ii. Horace S. Child, b. Feb. 6, 1796, m. Oct. 15, 1817, Mary P. 

Rice. 

2220. iii. Chauncey Child, b. Mch. 10. 1798, m. Frances Cecelia Morse. 

2221. iv. Anna Maria Child, b. April 7, 1801, at Brandon, Vt., d. Oct., 
1867, at Castleton, Vt. ; unmarried. 

2222. v. Earl Child, b. Mch. 13, 1803, in. Louisa Keyes of Stockbridge, 

Vt. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 313 

2223. vi. Almira Child, b. Mch. 7, 1805, m. May. 1828, Edward Whit- 
comb. 

2224 vii. Alonzo Child, 1). July 21, 1807, m. Aug. 28, 1838, Mary 
Goodrich. 

2225. viii. Benjamin Franklin Child, b May 27, 1809, m. April 30, 
187, Esther Hicks. 

2226. ix. Julia Child, b April 27, 1811, m. Oct. 1840. Chester Baxter. 

2227. x. Pearley A. Child, b. April 8, 1813, m. 1st, April 13, 1834, Helen 
Pratt; ra. 2d. Aug. 1877, Miss Hawley. 

2228. xi. William Gray Child, b. Oct. 8, 1815, in Brandon, Vt , d. in 
Michigan ; unmarried. 

2229. xii. Eliza Greenwood Child, b. May 12, 1819, at Brandon, Vt. 
Resides in Orange, N. J.; unmarried. 

2230. xiii. Jane Bethia Child, b. Oct. 27, 1822, at Brandon. Vt., d. Jan. 
16, 1862, at Castleton, Vt. ; unmarried. 

To all these children Mr. Ebenezer Child secured the best possible advan- 
tages for education available, in the true New England spirit considering it 
the surest endowment he could secure to them. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2219. ii. Horace S. Child, second child and eldest son of 
Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon, Eutland Co., 
Vt., Feb. 6, 1796, m. Oct.- 15, 1817, Miss Mary P. Rice, of 
Hardwick, Worcester Co., Mass. Mr. Child, like many others 
of his race, found a home and final resting in the West, where 
he closed his long and useful life in Geneseo, Henry Co., 111., 
on the 4th of March, 1872, at seventy-two years of age. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2231. i. Horace Rice Child, b. Oct. 23, 1818, m Miss Mary Lee, of 
Springfield, Vt. 

2232. ii. Ellen Maria Child, b. Aug. 18, 1820, m. Oct. 15, 1839, Henry 
S. Ford. 

2233. iii. Orange Watson Child, b. Aug. 29, 1824, m. Aug. 6, 1851, Susan 
Stickney. 

2234. iv. Ann Melissa Child, b. Oct. 19, 1826, m. May 11, 1847, Benjamin 
F. Baker. 

2235. v. Sarah Jane Child, b. Mch., 1830, m. Jan. 10, 1850, James G. 
Goodrich. 

2236. vi. Albert Alonzo Child, b. June, 1832, m. Frances Page. 

2237. vii. Francis Pearley Child, b. Mch. 31, 1835, m. July 15, 1856, 
Celia Gillespie. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2231. i. Horace Rice Child, eldest son and child of Horace 
S. and May P. Rice Child, b. in Brandon, Vt, Oct. 23, 1818, 
m. in Springfield, Windsor Co., Vt., Miss Mary Lee. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2238. i. George Child. 

2239. ii. Elizabeth Child. 
X 



314 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2240. iii. Sarah Child. 

2241. iv. Herbert Child. ) T . 

2242. v. Henry Child, \ lwins - 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2232. ii. Ellen Maria Child, eldest dau. and second child 
of Horace S. and Mary P. Rice Child, b. in Rutland, Vt., Aug. 
18, J 820, m. Oct. 15, 1839, Mr. Henry S. Ford, of Mendon, Vt. 
Reside in Geneseo, Henry Co., 111. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2243. i. Watson R. Ford, b. Nov. 18, 1840, at Mendon, Rutland Co., Vt., 
d. Dec. 12, 1863, in Danville Prison, from wounds received in the war in 
1861. He belonged to Co. I., 112th Illinois Volunteers. 

2244. ii. Sarah E Ford, b. April 27, 1846, m. Oct. 15, 1869, Mill P. 
Parker. 

2245. iii. J. Dayton Ford, b. June 6, 1847, m. Dec. 29, 1870, Minnie K. 
Weston. 

2246. iv. Ella B. Ford, b. July 11, 1849, in. Dec. 29, 1S74. George W. 
Beale. 

2247. v. Horace C. Ford, b. Mch. 2, 1853, m Feb. 29, 1878. Nettie J. 
Sargent. 

2248. vi. Fanny M. Ford, b. May 25, 1759, at Geneseo, 111. 

2249. vii. Fred L. Ford, b. July 20, 1861, at Geneseo, 111., d. Aug. 15, 
1875. 

2250. viii. Henry L. Ford, b. Mch. 31, 1865, at Geneseo, 111., d June 19. 
1866. 

[Eighth Generation.] • 

2244. ii. Sarah E. Ford, eldest dau. and second child of 
Ellen M. Child and Henry S. Ford, b. in Mendon, Vt. ( April 
27, 1846, m. Oct. 15, 1869, Mill R Parker. Reside in Kinsley. 
Edwards Co., Kanzas. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2251. i. Jessie E. Parker, b. Sept. 4. 1870. 

2252. ii. James Parker, b. Sept. 1, 1872, d. Mch. 28. 1873. 

2253. iii. Guy W. Parker, b. Mch. 19, 1873. d. July 25, 1878. 
% 2254. iv. F. Blanch Parker, b. May 18, 1874, d. Aug. 22, 1878. 
"^ 2255. v. Lillie Parker, b. Sept. 9, 1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2245. iii. J. Dayton Ford, second son and third child of 
Ellen M. Child and Henry S. Ford, b. in Mendon, Vt, June 6, 
1847, rn. Dec. 29, 1S70, Minnie K. Weston. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2256. i. Ellen H. Ford, b. Oct. 17, 1874. 

2257. ii. Harry T. Ford, b. April 16, 1875. 
[Eighth Generation.] 

2246. iv. Ella B. Ford, second dau. and fourth child of 
Ellen M. Child and Henry S. Ford, b. in Mendon, Vt., July 11, 
1849, m. Dec. 29, 1874, George W. Beale. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 315 

[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

2258. i. George A. Beale, b. Dec. 26, 1875. 

2259. ii. E. Blanch Beale, b. April 5, 1870. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

22+7. v. Horace Child Ford, third son and fifth child of 
Ellen M. Child and Henry S. Ford, b. in Mendon, Vt., Mch. 2, 
1853, m. Feb. 29, 187S, Nettie J. Sargent. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2260. i. Guy D. Ford, b. Mch. 8, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2233. iii. Orange Watson Child, second son and third 
child of Horace S. and Mary P. Rice Child, b. Aug. 2 ( J, 1824:. 
in Castleton, Rutland Co., Vt., m. in Boonville. Oneida Co., 
New York, Aug. 6, 1851, Miss Susan Stickney. Mr. and Mrs, 
O. W. Child reside in Elizabeth, Union Co., New Jersey. 

Mr. Child is largely engaged in railway enterprise, in Nassau 

Street, New York City — supplying railway corporations with 

equipments for operating their roads, such as steel and iron rails, 

locomotives, cars, etc. We are much indebted to Mr. Child 

for the interest he has taken in our work, and for essential aid 

in furnishing; family records. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2261. i. William Child, b. Oct. 3, 1851, d. same day in Boonville, N. Y. 
22H2. ii Josephine Child, b. Jan. 23, 1856 at Boonville, N. Y., d. Jan. 

8, 1859, in St. Louis, Missouri 

2263. iii. Frank Watson Child, b. Dec. 12, 1859, at Boonville, N. Y. ; 
resides in Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

2264. iv. Jennie S. Child, b. Aug. 4, 1861, d. May 16, 1862, in Tarry- 
Town-on-the-Hudson, N. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2234. iv. Ann Melissa Child, second dau. and fourth 
child of Horace S. and Mary P. Rice Child, b. Oct. 19, 1826, 
m. May 11, 1847, Benjamin Franklin Baker, of Pittsfield, Yt. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baker are now resident in Chicago, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2265. i. MaryEdnah Baker, b. Mch. 18, 1848, in. abt. 1861, Albert Smith. 

2266. ii. Clara Maria Baker, b. Oct. 1, 1858, at Rock Island, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2265. i. Mary Ednah Baker, eldest child of Ann Melissa 
Child and Benjamin F. Baker, b. in Pittsfield, Yt., Mch. 18, 
184$, m. about 1861, Albert Smith. Reside in Chicago, 111. 



316 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2267. i. Lathie E. Smith, b. May 1, 1862, in Chicago, 111. 

2268. ii Frank Baker Smith. 

2269. iii. Kate Stevens Smith. 

2270. iv. Carrie Smith. 

[Seventh Generation] 

2235. v. Sarah Jane Child, third dau. and fifth child of 
Horace S. and Mary P. Bice Child, b. Mch. 1830, at Glens 
Falls, Warren Co., N. Y., m. Jan. 10, 1850, in St. Louis,'Mis- 
souri, to Mr. James G. Goodrich ; removed from St. Louis in 
1863. to il2 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111., with their family. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2271. i. Mary Wallace Goodrich, b. Nov. 26, 1850, at St. Louis. Mo. 

2272. ii. Julius G. Goodrich, b. Oct. 6, 1852, at St. Louis. Mo. 

2273. iii. Nellie Goodrich, b. Jan. 6, 1855, at St. Louis, Mo. 

2274. iv. Sarah Child Goodrich ,) T ■ ( b. Aug. 6,1 857, St. Louis, Mo. 

2275. v. James G. Goodrich, f ±wiru '( d. Sept -10, 1857. 

2276. vi. Harry Goodrich, b. July 11, 1867, in Chicago, 111. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2236. vi. Albert Alonzo Child, third son and sixth child 
of Horace S. and Mary P. Rice Child, b. June, 1832, m. Frances 
Page, at Nashua, N. H. Mr. Child is in business in Chicago, 111. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children. 

2277. i. Jessie Child. 

2278. ii. George Child. 

2279. iii. Paige Child. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2237. vii. Francis Pearley Child, fourth son and seventh 
child of Horace S. and Mary P. Rice Child, b. in Pittsfield^t, 
March 31, 1835, m. July 15, 1856. Celia Gillespie, and resides 
at present in Chicago, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child : 

2280. i. Francis Child. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2220. iii. Chauncey Child, second son and third child of 
Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon, Rutland Co., 
Vt., March 10, 1798, m. Jan. 1, 1811, Miss Frances Celia Morse, 
at Brighton, Livingston Co., Michigan. Mr. Chauncey Child 
died at Staunton, Mt. Calm Co., Michigan, Nov. 26, 1875. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2281. i. Eliza Cecelia Child, b. July 29, 1842, m. June 5, 1860, Joseph 

F. Jewett. 

2282. ii. Chauncey Eugene Child, b. April 15, 1844, in Hartland. Livings- 
ton, Co., Mich., d. Jan. 10, 1845, 



AXD HIS DESCENDANTS. 317 

2283. iii. Frances Eugenie Child, b. April 29, 1846. in Hartland, Livings- 
ton Co., Mich., d. Sept. 1, 1848. 

2281. iv. Ebenezer G. Child, b. Mch 11. 1848, in Hartland, Livingston 
Co., Mich., m. at Greenville. Mich., July 3, 1877. Mi~> Ollie Sharp. 

2285 v. Emma Louisa Child b. Oct. 14. 1830, in Hart land Livingston 
Co.. Mich. 

2286 vi. Franklin Gray Child, b. Oct. 1. 1852. in Hartland. Livings- 
ton Co., Mich., d. Jan. 23, 1859. in Cleveland, Ohio. 

2287 vii. Burr Julius Herbert Child, b. Men. 13, 1835. in. Dec. 31, 
1874. Alice M Cannon. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2281. i. Eliza Cecelia Child, eldest dau. and child of 
Chauncey and Frances Celia Morse Child, b. in Hartland, 
Livingston Co., Mich.. July 20, 1842. rn. in Cleveland Ohio, 
June 5, 1860, Joseph F. Jewett. Reside in Cincinnati. Ohio. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2288. i Laura Heppie Jewett. b. Mch. 21, 1861. at Cincinnati. Ohio. 

2289. ii. Jennie Louise Jewett, b. Aug 31. 1862, at Cincinnati. Ohio d. 
Sept. 3, 1805. 

2290. iii. Helen Maria Jewett, b. April 13, 1864. at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2291. iv. Carrie Louise Jewett. b. Aug. 11. 1866. at Wyoming, Ohio. 

2292. v. Joseph F. Jewett, Jr.. b. July 11, 1868, at Wyoming, Ohio. 

2293. vi. Grace Eliza Jewett. b. Sept. 13, 1870. at Wyoming. Ohio. 

2294. vii. Max Jewett, b. Nov. 17. 1872, at Wyoming, Ohio. 

2295. viii. Cecelia Child Jewett, b. Dec. 26. 1874. at Wyoming. Ohio. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2287. vii. Burr Julius Herbert Child, fourth son and 

seventh child of Chauneev and Frances Celia Morse Child, b. 

in Milford, Oakland Co.. Mich., m. at Mill Brook, Mich., Dec. 

31. 1874. Miss Alice M. Cannon. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

2296. i. Lewis Herbert Child, b. Oct. 26, 1876. 

[Sixth Generation ] 

2222. v. Earl Child, third son and fifth child of Ebenezer 
and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon. Rutland Co., Vt., Mch. 
13, 1803, m. at Stockbridge. Vt, Nov. 4. 1827, Miss Louisa W. 
Keyes, who was b. in Bridge water. Vt, Sept. 13, 1813. Mr. 
Earl Child died in Hartland. Mich., April 9, 1S62. Mrs. Child 
died in Brighton. Mich., June 14, 1845. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children. 

2297. i. A daughter— unchristened— b. Feb. 10, 1829, d. same day in Pitts- 
field, Vt. 

2298. ii. Earl Keyes Child, b. Mch. 21. 1830. in Pittsfield. Vt., m. May 
30, 1852, Jennette Harrington. 

2299. iii. A son — unchristened— b. April 5, 1832, d. same day, in Bran- 
don. Vt. 



3 IS BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBTJRY, MASS. 

2300. iv. Minon J. Child, b. Jan. 26, 1833, d. Jan. 31, 1833, in 
Leicester, Vt. 

2301. v. Anna Maria Child, b. Jan. 9, 1836, m. Oct. 23, 1854, John S. 
Topping. 

2302. vi. Helen Pratt Child, b. Feb. 21, 1839, m. Feb. 28, 1861, Robert 
B. Smith. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2301. v. Anna Maria Child, fifth child of Earl and Louisa 
W. Keyes Child, b. in Green Oak, (afterwards Oakland) Mich., 
Jan. 9, 1836, m. Oct. 23, 1854, John S. Topping, at Tarrytown, 
K Y. 

[Eighth Generation J Children: 

2303. i. Mary Louise Topping, b. Oct. 11, 1857, in New York City. 

2304. ii. Jessie Patience Topping, b. Dec. 9, 1860, in Alton, 111. 

2305. iii. Helen Maria Topping, b. July 25, 1863. in Alton, 111. 

2306. iv. Erastus Doane Topping, b. Oct. 27, 1866, in Alton, 111. 

2307. v. Alonzo Child Topping, b. Jan. 25, 1869, in Alton, 111. 

2308. vi. Gracie Sheldon Topping, b. Oct. 19, 1871, in Alton, 111. 

2309. vii. John Ryder Topping, b. Feb. 1, 1875, in Alton, 111. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2302. vi. Helen Pratt Child, sixth and youngest child 
of Earl and Louisa W. Keyes Child, b. in Hartland, Livingston 
Co.. Mich., Feb. 21, 1839, m. Feb. 28, 1861, .Robert B. Smith, in 
Alton, 111. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

2310. i. Earl Clarendon Smith, b. April 26, 1862, in Alton, 111. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2223. vi. Almira Child, third dau. and sixth child of 
Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. at Brandon, Rutland Co., 
Vt., March 7, 1805, m. May, 1828, Mr. Edward Whitcomb, at 
Pittsfield, Vt. Reside at Le Roy, Mower, Co., Minnesota. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2311. i. Julia Whitcomb, b. Oct. 9, 1834, in Fredonia, Chautaucpia Co., 
New York. d. Aug. 9, 1853. 

2312. ii. Helen Whitcomb, b. June 13, 1836, in Fredonia, N. Y., d. May 
1844. 

2313. iii. Anna Whitcomb, b. Sept. 10, 1838, in Hiram, Portage Co., 
Ohio. m. Sept. 20, 1856. Albert Allen, at Le Roy, Minn. Resides in Cali- 
fornia. 

2314. iv. Edward B. Whitcomb, b. Oct. 5, 1841, in Spring Prairie, Wis., 
m. Feb. 22, 1868, Maggie Taylor, at Le Roy, Minn. 

2315. v. Emma Whitcomb, b. Mch. 19, 1846, at Burlington, Wis., d. April 

9, 1848. 

2316. vi. Adelaide Whitcomb, b. Oct. 16, 1849, in Burlington, Wis, m. 
Aug. 10, 1867, Samuel Bacon, in Le Roy, Minn. 



AND HTS DESCENDANTS. 319 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2224. vii. Aloxzo Child, fourth son and seventh child of 
Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon, Vt., July 21, 
1807, m. Aug. 28, 1S3S, in Pittsrield, Vt, Miss Mary Goodrich, 
dau. of Mr. James Goodrich ; a Scotch family. Mrs. Goodrich, 
the mother of Mrs. Alonzo Child, was a Wallace, said to be 
in direct descent from the hero of Scotland. 

Mr. Alonzo Child, like his brothers and sisters, was educated 
in the common schools and academies of New England, but 
from the rapid growth of the frame which early attained more 
than average stature, there resulted much physical weakness, 
resulting in an affection of the eyes which ultimately destroyed 
the sight of one. Skillful treatment from the leading physicians 
of Massachusetts saved him from utter blindness. Though thus 
tried at his entrance upon the activities of life, he was nothing 
daunted, but with cheerful zeal began the career which resulted 
for him in such pecuniary success. His debut was made in 
Lowell, Mass., a large manufacturing city. Hither he bent his 
steps, entrusted by Dr. Eliphalet Nott, President of Union 
College, Schenectady, N. Y., with a consignment of the stoves 
invented and patented by Dr. Nott, for the use of anthracite 
coal. The venture was an entirely successful one, attesting 
anew the quick apprehension of character, and whole-hearted 
generositv of the learned Doctor, as well as the thorough busi- 
ness capabilities of the young merchant. This location though 
pleasant to Mr. Child in many respects, did not offer the oppor- 
tunity for that enlargement of business of which Mr. Alonzo 
Child felt capable. Closing his affairs in Lowell, Mr. Child 
went to the West and found in the stirring haste, and breadth 
of method, the kind of business atmosphere for which he was 
especially adapted. He made St. Louis, Missouri, the base of 
his operations, which proved an eminently wise decision. Mr. 
Child made for himself a name and position among the mer- 
chant princes of that city. His interests were wide and deep ; 
unostentatious in charities, he was yet always ready to help on 
every movement which promised elevation to his fellow-beings, 
either pecuniarily or morally. Many prosperous business houses 
to-day owe largely their success to some kindly loan or start in 
life from his easily sliding purse-string. With all this extreme 
activity, Mr. Child was a man of strong home attachments, 



320 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

delighting to render his abode one of attraction from its luxury 
of comforts. In the years 18-43-4, Mr. Child was in Europe 
combining business profits and intellectual culture. From the 
year 1850, Mr. Child became a resident of Tarry -town on-the- 
Hudson, not far from New York City, though continuing his 
business houses in the West and usually passing a large part 
of each winter in St. Louis. Of his patriotism we will permit 
the accompanying resolutions to speak, premising that Mr. 
Child had reached the close of his life, so full of large interests 
in the West, and of pleasant, useful, honorable characteristics 
in the social world of his eastern home, on the third of June, 
J873. Mr. Child was trustee of the Mutual Life Ins. Co., o* 
New York City, and director of the Westchester Savings Bank, 
aiding largely in the formation of the latter. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Mutual 
Life Ins. Co.. of New York City, held June 4, .1873, the Presi- 
dent announced the death of Alonzo Child, a Trustee of the 
company for many years. Judge Davis addressed the Chair as 
follows, presenting the appended resolutions: 

"3Ir. President: The announcement you have just made of the decease of 
one of the most respected and esteemed members of this Board, must fill 
every heart with profound sorrow and deep sympathy. Alonzo Child has 
been a useful and honored member of this Board for many years, always 
faithful to duty, wise in council and ready to discharge every obligation 
with fidelity and integrity. Mr. Child was distinguished for a long and 
honored mercantile career. His commercial integrity was never questioned, 
and he ever stood in the front ranks of those who have transacted the busi- 
ness affairs of our country. But 1 desired to refer particularly to the in- 
valuable and patriotic services he rendered to the country in its late strug- 
gles for national existence. Mr. Child had a large mercantile house establish- 
ed at St. Louis, and through it, for more than thirty years previous to 1861, 
had furnished the government with all needful supplies in the line of his 
business, for its armies in the West, and the Indian tribes dependent upon 
the government for their annual needs. At the commencement of the war, 
his firm at St. Louis invested everything they had for the purpose of main- 
taining the government of the United States. They had at one time risked 
over a million of dollars in supplies furnished to maintain troops in the 
field They were the first to hang out the stars and stripes on Main St., in 
St. Louis: and were always willing to trust the government with anything 
they wanted and to imperil their whole fortune in its support. The mer- 
chants in St. Louis would not sell to or trust the government, but Mr. 
Child's house did, until his resident partner thought they were ready to 
break, and telegraphed to Mr Child, at New York, to know if they should 
go on, to which Mr. Child replied: 'Proceed to the extent of every dollar we 
have, and all you can raise.' His efforts to sustain the government were 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 321 

characterized by its officers as nearly superhuman, and the name of no man 
should be held in more grateful remembrance than thai of Alonzo Child, 
for his unrequited and priceless services in sustaining this nation in its 
hour of peril. 1 quote from the record for these facts in a case in which I 
acted professionally for Mr Child: and I shall ever blush for my country al 
the injustice it meted out to him in the matter. 

But peace to his memory. He has gone where the wicked cease from 
troubling and the weary are at rest Let us ever cherish in grateful remem- 
brance his many virtues. Ins kind, genial and quiet manners, and imitate 
his self sacrifices, patriotic devotion to hi< country, and fidelity in the dis- 
charge of every duty." 

Much more of like character was here said, and by the Trustees 
of the Westchester Savings Bank, as well as by the press, one 
sentiment pervading every utterance that of thorough, ready, 
cordial recognition of the entire honesty of his life. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2317. i. Don Alonzo Child, b. Aug. 30, 1840. m. Dec. 12, 1865, Annie 
Cromwell. 

2318. ii. Dayton Child, b. July, 1840. d. June, 1841, in St Louis, Mo. 

2319. iii. Julius Pratt Child, \ —. < Resides in Jacksonville, Fla. 

'. 3. Jb Feb. 14, 184*. [Wheelwright. 

2320. iv. Charles Gardner Child, \ ?. fm, April 16, 1871, Carrie 

2321. v. George Franklin Child, b. 1847, d. 1847, in St. Louis. Mo. 

2322. vi. Mary Emma Child, b. April 23, 1849, at St. Louis, Mo., in. Dec. 
16, 1869, Stephen C. Millett, 

2323. vii. Henry Clay Child, b. May 6, 1852. at Tarrytown, N. Y., m 
July 15, 1875, Lizzie Ferguson, of New York. 

2324. viii. Kate Maria Child, b. Aug. 10, 1853. m. Dec. 7, 1875. Daniel 
C. Millett. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2317. i. Don Alonzo Child, eldest son and child of Alonzo 
and Mary Goodrich Child, b. in St. Louis, Mis., Aug. 30, 1840, 
m. Dec. 12, 1S65, Miss Annie Cromwell, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Don Alonzo Child reside in New York City. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2325. i. Cromwell Child, b. July 8, 1867, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 
2326 ii. Mary Goodrich Child, b Nov 8 1868. in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

[Seventh Generation. 

232U. iv. Charles Gardner Child, twin son with Julius 
Pratt Child, of Alonzo and Mary Goodrich Child, b. in St. 
Louis, Mo., Feb. 14, 1845, m. April 16, 1871, Miss Carrie 
Wheelwright, of New York City, in which place Mr. and Mrs. 
Chas. G. Child reside, at 125 W. 47th st. Mr. Charles G. Child 
is a broker on Wall st., New York City. 



322 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2327. i. Charles Gardner Child. Jr., b. Mch. 1872, in New York. 

2328. ii. Bessie Wheelwright Child, b. Oct. 1877, in New York. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

2322. vi. Mary Emma Child, eldest dau. and sixth child 
of Alonzo and Mary Goodrich Child, b. in St. Louis, Mo., 
April 23, 1849, m. Dec. 16, 1869, Stephen C. Millett. Miv 
Millett died in Columbia, South Carolina, Feb. 24, 1874. Mrs. 
Millett resides in Orange, N. J. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2329. i. Mary Goodrich Millett, b. Dec. 7, 1870. in Beaufort, S. C. 

2330. ii. Katie Child Millett, b. Sept. 13, 1872, in Beaufort, S. C. 

2331. iii. Stephen Colwell Millett, b. Dec. 5. 1873, in Beaufort, S. C. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2324. viii. Kate Maria Child, second dau. and youngest 
child of Alonzo and Mary Goodrich Child, b. in Tarry-town- 
on-the Hudson, Aug. 10, 1853, rn. Dec. 7, 1875, Daniel C. 
Millett, at South Orange, N. J. Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Millett 
reside in Milwaukee, Wis. 
[Eighth Generation .] Child : 

2332. i. Anna Gray Millett, b. Sept. 3, 1877, in Milwaukee, Wis. 

[Sixth Generation ] 

2225. viii. Benjamin Franklin Child, fifth son and eighth 
child of Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon, Vt., 
May 27, 1809, m. April 30, 1817, Esther Hicks, at Bennington, 
Vt. ; died in Shiawassee Co., Mich. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2333. i. George Child, b. May 12, 1848, m. Dec. 1870. 

2334 ii. Alonzo L\ Child, b. July 21, 1853, m. July 21, 1875, at Lanes- 
burg, Mich. : d. April 29, 1877, at same place. 

2335. iii. Watson Child, b. Nov. 21, 1861, at Shionapa, Mich. Resides 
in Lanesburg, Mich. 

2336. iv. Edwin Child b. Oct. 1, 1866, at Lanesburg, Mich. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2226. ix. Julia Child, fourth dau. and ninth child of 
Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon, Rutland Co., 
Vt., April 27, 1811, m. Oct., 1840, Chester Baxter, at Pittsfield, 
Vt., and died at Castleton, Vt., April 4, 1867, aged 5H years. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2337. i. Ellen Dana Baxter, b. July, 1841, in Pittsfield, Vt., m. Oct. 
10. 1868, John H. Langdon. 

2338 ii. Elizabeth Morse Baxter, b. April, 1845, in Pittsfield, Vt., m 
April 4, 1870, Benson Ferris. Resides at Princeton, 111. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 323 

| 
[Sixth Generation.] 

2227. x. Pearled Augustus Child, sixth son and tenth 
child of Ebenezer and Anna Gray Child, b. in Brandon, Vt, 
April, 8, 1813; has been twice married — 1st, April 13, 1834, 
by Rev. Elisha Tucker, to Helen Maria Pratt, in Buffalo, N. Y,. 
where she was b. Dec. 1, 1817. Mrs. H. M. Pratt Child died at 
West Exeter, N. Y., April 14, 1866. Mr. Child m. 2d, Aug., 
1S77, Miss Hawley, of Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. Child is engaged 
in the hardware business, in the stove manufacturing depart- 
ment. He is a man of strong presence and genial spirit; a well 
proportioned man six feet in height. He was associated with 
his brother, Alonzo Child, in the hardware trade in St. Louis, 
Missouri, for some years, where they were most extensive and 

successful operators. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2389. i. Helen Pratt Child, b. Mch. 8, 1835, m. Dee. 17, 1856, Lorenzo 
D. Colt. 

2340. ii. Frances Rachel Child, b. Nov. 12, 1836, m. Oct. 6. 1859, Clark 
Lockwood Carpenter. 

2341. iii. Pascal P. Child, b. Get. 25, 1838, m. Nov. 10, 1861, Charlotte 
H. Clarke. 

2342. iv. Hiram Herendean Child, b. Oct. 26, 1840. d. Aug. 14, 1849, 
at Buffalo, N. Y. 

2343. v. Marilla Allen Child, b. Aug. 2, 1842, d. Feb. 4, 1847, at 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

2344. vi. Julia Maria Child, b. Sept. 28, 1848, in. Dec. 12, 1873, Mark 
L. Filley. 

2345. vii. Pearley Augustus Child, Jr , b. July 24, 1857, at Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2339. i. Helen Pkatt Child, eldest child of Pearley 
Augustus and Helen M. Pratt Child, b. in Buffalo, N. Y., Mch 
8, 1835, m. in Cleveland, Ohio, Dec. 17, 1856, Lorenzo D. Colt 
Eesided in West Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., where she d. May 

1, 1866. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2346. i. Pascal Chester Colt, b. May, 1859, at West Exeter, N. Y. 

2347. ii. Charlotte Henrietta Colt, b. Nov. 21, 1860, at West Exeter, 
N. Y. 

2348. iii. James Denison Colt, b. July, 1862, at West Exeter, N. Y. 

2349. iv. Lorenzo Colt, b. Dec 1863, at West Exeter, N. Y , d. at same 
place Dec. 1863. 

[Seventh Generation] 

2340. ii. Frances Eachel Child, second dau. and child of 
Pearlev Augustus and Helen M. Pratt Child, b. in Buffalo, 



324 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

N. Y., Nov. 12, 1836, m. at St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 6, 1859, Clark 
Lockwood Carpenter. Reside in Lansingburgh, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2350. i. Clark Hiram Carpenter, b. Dec. 29, 1860, at Kansas City. Mo. 

2351. ii. Pearley Augustus Carpenter, b. Aug. 19, 1862, at St. Louis, 
Mo., d. Aug. 22, 1865, at West Exeter, N. Y. 

2352. iii. Helen Maria Carpenter, b. Aug. 13, 1864, d. Aug. 12, 1865. 
at West Exeter, N. Y. 

2353. iv. Frederic Augustus Carpenter, b. Mch. 14. 1868, at Orange, 
N. J. 

2354. v. Frances Lucille Carpenter, b. Aug. 5, 1872, at Lansingburgh, 
N.Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2341. iii. Pascal Pratt Child, eldest son and third child of 
Pearley Augustus and Helen M. Pratt Child, b. in Buffalo, 
N. Y., Oct. 25, 1838, m. in St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 10. 1861, 
Charlotte H. Clarke. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2355. i. Pascal Child, b. 1862, and d. in St. Louis, Mo. 

2356. ii. Helen Child, b. July 5, 1864, in St Louis, Mo. 

2357. iii. Harry Child. 

2358. iv. Hiram Child, d. at Carlyle, 111. 

2359. v. Charlotte Child. 

2360. vi. Frances Rena Child. 

2361. vii. Julia Child. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2344. vi. Julia Maria Child, fourth dau. and sixth child 
of Pearley Augustus and Helen M. Pratt Child, b. in Buffalo, 
N. Y., Sept. 28, 1818, m. at Lansingburgh, N. Y., Dec. 12, 
1873, Mark L. Filley. Eeside in Lansingburgh, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2362. i. Oliver Dwight Filley, b. Mch. 14, 1876, in Lansingburgh, N.Y. 

2363. ii. Marcus L. Filley, b. Sept. 18, 1878, in Lansingburgh, N. Y. 

2364. iii. Frederic Child Filley, b. May 30, 1879, in Lansingburgh, N.Y. 

[Third Generation.] 

22. viii. William Child, eighth child and fifth son of 
Benjamin and Grace Morris Child, b. in Eoxbury, Mass., Oct. 
14, 1677, m. L723, Deborah Goddard, dau. of Joseph and 
Deborah Goddard. He early removed to Woodstock, Ct. 
[Fourth Generation.] Children. 

2365. i. Lucy Child, b in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 30, 1729, m. April 26, 
1753, Thomas May. 

2366. ii. Jonathan Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Dec. 17, 1731, m. June 
12, 1755, Dinah Bacon. 

2367. iii. William Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1733, d. 1734. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 325 

[Fourth Generation.] 

230(1 ii. Col. Jonathan Child, second child and eldest son 
of William and Deborah Goddard Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 
Dec. 17, 1731, m. June 12, 1755, Dinah Bacon, dau. of Thomas 
Bacon. She was b. 1735, and d. dan. 3, 1814. He d. April 5, 
1814, in Thetford, Vt. He obtained his military title of colonel 
in the Revolutionary army. He was engaged in the battles of 
Bunker Hill ami Bennington, as well as other battles. 

Col. Jonathan Child was among the early emigrants from 
Woodstock, Ct., to that part of New Hampshire bordering on 
Vermont, and settled in Orford, N. H. At what date we are 
not informed, but probably between the years of 1770 and '75. 
Hon. William Child, of Fairlee, Vt., who is familiar with the 
history of that part of the State of Vermont upon which Orford 
borders, and who has supplied a chapter of history for a "His- 
torical Gazetteer 1 ' of Vermont, says : 

"In ray researches for scraps of history for that work, I found Col. Jona- 
than Child, then of Orford, N. H , was with others quite prominent in the 
first organization of Fairlee, Yt., as a town, which was then a small parcel 
of the territory known as the 'New Hampshire Grant,' and as a matter of 
course, several of our first town meetings between the years 1770 and 1780, 
were warned and held in Orford, N. H. Col. Child, I think, afterwards 
moved to Lyme, N. H , and possibly might have crossed the river and locat- 
ed in Thetford, Vt. At any rate his son William, who spent a large pro- 
perty as commissary for the purchase of supplies for our Revolutionary 
soldiers, located on a river farm in Thetford, Vt., where some of his descen- 
dants are still residing." 
| Fifth Generation ] Children. 

2368. i. Cyril Child, b. May 5, 1756. Killed in battle in Pennsylvania, 
July 4, 1778. A soldier of the Revolutionary war. 

2369. ii. William Child, b. Dec. 10, 1757, m. Sept. 28, 1780, Mary Heaton. 

2370. iii. Zeriah Child, b. Oct. 9, 1759. 

2371. iv. Persis Child, b. Aug. 23, 1761, d. Jan. 29, 1786. 

2372. v. Lucy Child, b. Aug. 24, 1763, m. Israel Newton, M. D. 

2373. vi. Azubah Child, b. Jan. 13, 1765, d. Oct. 27, 1784. 

2374. vii. Asenath Child, b Dec. 29, 1767, m. Day. Had one 

daughter, Mrs. Asenath Pettibone of Muscatine, Iowa. 

2375. viii. Deborah Child, b. Dec. 15, 1769, d. July 31, 1799. 

2376. ix. Abiel Child, b. Jan. 22, 1772, at Lyme, N. H., d. May 5, 1773. 

2377. x. Hannah Child, b. Oct. 31. 1774. 

2378. xi. Polly Child, b. July 24, 1777, m. Rev. Asa Burton. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2369. ii. William Child, second child and son of Col. 
Jonathan and Dinah Bacon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 
10, 1757, m. Sept. 28, 1780, Mary Heaton, who was b. in Swan- 



326 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

sey, N. H., Oct. 14, 1756, dau. of Captain William Heaton. 
She d. at Thetford, Vt., Dec. 23, 1836. He d. at Thetford, 
Vt., Aug. 27, 1843, aged 86. 

Mr. Child was a Revolutionary soldier, and fought with Col. 
Jonathan Child, his father, in the battle of Bennington, and 
in other battles. He settled in Thetford, Vt, where he was an 
extensive property holder ; a man of much influence and relia- 
bility ; an earnest and self-sacrificing patriot, having spent a 
large share of his handsome estate in aiding the triumph of the 
American cause. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2377. i. Lucinda Child, b. in Thetford, Vt, July 4, 1781, m. 1823, Solo- 
men Childs, of Henniker, N. H., where she d. Jan. 20, 1852, leaving ro 
children. 

2378. ii. Olive Child, b. in Thetford, Vt., June 3, 1782, d. June 20, 1782. 

2379. iii. Cyril Child, b. in Thetford, Vt., April 20, 1783. m. Polly . 

2380. iv Jonathan Child, b. in Lyme, N. H., Jan. 30, 1785. m. May 7, 
1818, Sophia Eliza Rochester. 

2381. v. Bela Child, b. in Thetford, Vt, Dec. 28, 1786, m. 1st, Feb. 28. 
1812, Rosalinda Chapman, m. 2d, Feb. 3, 1834, Sally Belding Page. 

2382. vi. Abiel Child, b. in Thetford. Vt, Jan. 12, 1789, d. Jan. 1789. 

2383. vii. Azubah Child, b. in Thetford, Vt., Jan. 10, 1790, m. Joseph 
Kinney. 

2384. viii. Persis Child, b. in Thetford, Vt., Jan. 31, 1792, m. July 6. 
1815, Benjamin Maltby. 

2385. ix. Eber Child, b. Feb. 28, 1794, d. Jan. 10, 1795. 

2386. x. Elona Child, b. in Thetford, Vt, Feb. 9, 1796, d. unm., April 
22, 1863. 

2387. xi. Eber Child. 2d, b. in Thetford, Vt., July 31, 1798, m. Nancy 
Tyler. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2379. iii. Cyril Child, third child and eldest son of 
William and Mary Heaton Child, b. in Thetford, Vt, April 20, 

1783, m. Polly . Had seven children ; he d. April 4, 

1849. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2388. i. Mary Child, m. Mr. Thrasher. 

2389. ii. Lucius Child, m. Miss Maltby. 

2390. iii. Maria Child, m. Mr. Maltby. 

2391. iv. Emily Child, m. Mr. Bickford. ) Q 

2392. v. Harriet Child, m. Mr. Bickford. } &ame P erson - 

2393. vi. Cynthia Child, unm. 

2394. vii. Azubah Child, unm. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2380. iv. Major Jonathan Child, fourth child and second 
son of William and Mary Heaton Child, b. in Lvme, N. H., 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 327 

Jan. 30, 1785, m. May 7. ISIS. Sophia Eliza Rochester, second 
dau. of Hon. Nathaniel Rochester, the founder of the city of 
Rochester, N. Y. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Oct, 27, 1860, 
and was buried at Mt. Hope Cemetery in Rochester, N. Y. 
They had five sons and four daughters. 

Mr. Jonathan Child descended from worthy ancestors whose 
nobilitv of birth was derived not of ro}'al blood, but of inherit- 
ed virtues, that imparted dignity, stability and commanding 
influence to their possessor. His history evinces traits of 
character that fitted him to occupy prominent and influential 
positions in society, both from his moral virtues and his intel- 
lectual force. The esteem in which he was held by his fellow 
citizens shows him to have been a sagacious, discreet and con- 
scientious man. His*record is one that his descendants may look 
back upon with pride, and with desire to emulate. 

As a patriot, he inherited the spirit and courage of ancestors 
whose love of country was conspicuous in the Revolutionary War, 
in which father and son fought side by side. When the call went 
forth for volunteers in the war of 1S12, Mr. Jonathan Child, 
(the subject of this notice) was enrolled as a volunteer, and 
fought in the battle of Fort Erie, and acquired the title of Major. 
At home he was as popular as he was influential abroad. The 
popular favor conferred upon him the honor of the first Mayor 
of the City of Rochester : and elected him one or more terms a 
member of the Legislature of the State of New York, from 
Ontario county. Few men have a deeper hold on the confi- 
dence and esteem of their fellow-citizens than did Mr. Child. 
We have been furnished with the following editorial articles, 
published in one of the Rochester papers, (the name of the 
paper was not given) on the occasion of his death, showing the 
estimate in which he was held in the community where he had 
spent the larger part of his active life : 

DEATH OF EX-MAYOR CHILD. 

" It will be heard with pam. but not with surprise, that our late fellow- 
citizen, the venerable Jonathan Child, is no more. He died at the resi- 
dence of his daughter, Mrs. Asher P. Nichols, in Buffalo, at half-past one 
o'clock this morning. Mr. Child had been in feeble health for a year past, 
and for a few weeks he had been hopelessly prostrate. His disease was an 
affection of the heart. He had been at Buffalo some time, under the care 
of his daughter, whose attentions he required to smooth his pathway to the 
grave, and make his last moments comfortable. Mr. Child was burn at 



32S 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



Lyme, New Hampshire, on the 30th Jany, 1785. His grandfather, bearing 
the same name, was a soldier of the Revolution, as was his father. Hfs 
father was a soldier in the war of 1812 and Mr. Child was also in that ser- 
vice, having held the post of major and paymaster in the militia of the 
State of New York. He was, we believe, present at the battle of Lake Erie. 
Deceased came from New England to Utica in 1806, and there taught 
school, and was subsequently a clerk for Watts Sherman, an extensive mer- 
chant of that city. In 1810 Mr. Child came to what is now Monroe county, 
and located as a merchant at Charlotte. He subsequently removed to 
Bloomfield. Ontario county, and was there in the mercantile business till 
about 1820. He then came to Rochester, and was subsequently an exten- 
sive contractor on the canal. He had a large contract at Lockport for cut- 
ting through the mountain ridge for the canal, and he also kept a store in 
the village. 

"In 1827, under the new village charter of Rochester, Mr. Child was 
chosen a trustee to represent the third ward, and he was reelected in 1830. 
In 1834, when the city charter was obtained, the common council elected 
Mr. Child mayor. He served, however, but a short time and resigned on 
the 23d day of June He was a conscientious advocate of temperance and 
not agreeing with the policy of the board in granting licenses, he resigned 
that he might not sacrifice his principles or clog the wheels of government 
of the new city. In his letter of resignation to the board he said : ' It be- 
comes incumbent on me. in my official character, to sign these papers 
(licenses) I am constrained to act according to my most solemn convic- 
tions of moral duty and estimation of legal right in all cases connected 
with the office intrusted to me When I find myself so situated in my offi- 
cial station as to be obliged, either on the one hand, to violate these high 
obligations, or, on the other, to stand in opposition to the declared wishes 
of a large majority of the board, and through them of their constituents— 
my valued friends and feliow-citizens— I dare not retain the public station 
which exposes me to this unhappy dilemma. I, therefore, now most re- 
spectfully resign into your hands the office of mayor of the city of Roches- 
ter.' This was nobly done, and we do not care to point to a better index of 
the character of Hon. Jonathan Child than this extract from his letter to 
the board presents. 

"In the later years of the life of Mr. Child he was unfortunate in busi- 
ness, and was deprived of all the gains of early life, but he met all his 
losses with fortitude, and moved on with the same equanimity of temper 
and cheerfulness that characterized him in youth. In this respect he was 
indeed a remarkable man, and a model for his fellow-citizens. No man 
was more esteemed than the deceased. He had no enemies and was beloved 
by all. He was a sincere christian and member of St. Luke's church for 
many years, and up to the last hour of consciousness on earth he main- 
tained that calmness, serenity and abiding confidence in his faith which the 
real christian always possesses. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2395. i. Mary Louisa Child, b. Feb. 8, 1819, in. Oct 28, 1841, Washing- 
ton Gibbons, Esq. 

2396. ii. Nathaniel Rochester Child, b. in Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 20, 
1820, m. June 26, 1844, Elizabeth Stone Prince. 



AND IILS DESCENDANTS. 320 

2397. iii. William Cumming Child, 1». Sept. 8, 1822, d. July 1, 1823. 

2398. iv. William Child, b. April 27, 1824, d. Doc. 2, 1824. 

2399. v. Emily Child. 1>. .Inly 10, 1825, m. Aug. 13, 1851, Hon. Asher 
P. Nichols, comptroller of the State of New York and senator one term in 
New York State Legislature. No children. Mr. Nichols d. May 30, 1880. 

2400. vi. Sophia Child, b. in Rochester, N. Y, Aug. 20, 1827, d. July 15, 
1828. 

2401 vii. Jonathan Henry Child, b. in Rochester, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1828. 
Mr. Child is a business man in Rochester, N. Y., and was recently editor 
of the Geneva Gazette, Geneva, X. Y. 

2402. viii. Cornelia Rochester Child, b. Sept. 8, 1832, d. Oct. 3, 1856. 

2403. ix. Thomas Coleman CniLD, b. July 25, 1837, d Aug. 17, 1837. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2395. i. Mary Louisa Child, eldest child of Maj. Jona- 
than and Sophia Eliza Rochester Child, b. Feb. 8, 1819, m. 
Oct. 28, 1841, Washington Gibbons, Esq., attorney-at-law 
and city recorder in Rochester, N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation] Children: 

2404. i. Jonathan Child Gibbons, b. in Rochester, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1842, 
d Maivh 28,1845. 

2405. ii. Sophia Rochester Gibbons, b in Rochester, N. Y. 

2406. iii. Nathaniel Rochester Gibbons, b. in Rochester, N. Y., June 
12, 1847, d. Sept, 6, 1856. 

2407. iv. Mary Stafford Gibbons, b. in Rochester, N. Y., May 15, 1851, 
d. Dec. 17, 1858. 

2408. y. Montgomery Gibbons, b. in Rochester, N. Y., Oct. 15, 1854. 

2409. vi. Emily Nichols Gibbons, b. in Rochester, N. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2396. ii. Nathaniel Rochester Child, second child and 
eldest son of Major Jonathan and Sophia Eliza Rochester 
Child, b. in Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 20, 1820, in. June 26, 
1841, Elizabeth Stone Prince, he d. October 8, 1848. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2410. i. Anna Cutler Child, b. March 8, 1845, d. 1851. 

2411. ii. Nathaniel Rochester Child, b. July 2, 1848, d. October, 1849. 

[Sixth Generation. ] 

2381. v. Bela Child, fifth child and third son of William 
and Mary Heaton Child, b. in Thetford, Yt, Dec. 28, 1786, m. 
twice — 1st Feb. 28, 1812, Rosalinda Chapman of Keene, N. H., 
she d. Oct. 3, 1831 ; Mr. Child m. 2d, Feb. 3, 1834, Sally 
Belding Page, she d. 1879 ; he d. in Thetford, Yt, July 30, 
1866. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2412. i. Irene King Child, b. in Thetford, Yt,, July 14, 1813, d. Aug. 
30, 1840, unmarried. 

Y 



330 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBTJRY, MASS. 

2413. ii. William Heaton Child, b. in Thetford, Vt., Oct. 6, 1814, m. 
twice — 1st, Lavina Morey; m. 2d, Jan. 21, 1863, Sarah Jane Howard. 

2414. iii. Jonathan Chapman Child, b. in Thetford, Vt.. April 16, 1817, 
m 1848, Emily Eliza Roberts. 

2415. iv Eleanor Clarinda Child, b Dec. 24, 1818, unmarried. 

2416. v. Lucy Ann Child, b. Aug. 23, 1823, unmarried. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2413. ii. William Heaton Child, eldest son and second 
child of Bela and Rosalinda Chapman Child, b. in Thetford, 
Vt., Oct. 6, 1814, m. Mch. 6, 1S39, Lavina Morey, dau. of 
Alanson Morey of Thetford, Vt., she d. Jan. 13, 1860; he m. 
2d, Sarah Jane Howard, Jan. 21, 1863. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : By first marriage. 

2417. i. William Arthur Child, b. Oct. 29, 1843, d. Nov. 22, 1859. 

2418. ii. Infant (unchristened), b. Nov. 15, 1848. d. March 25, 1849. 

2419. iii. Bela Child, b. May 24, 1852, m. Grace E. Lord May 24, 1879, 

and d. July 3, 1879. 

By second marriage. 

2420. iv. William Child, b. April 10, 1864, d. Sept. 16, 1864. 

2421. v. Mary Lucy Child, b. Jan. 27, 1866. 

2422. vi. Lizzie Howard Child, b. March 16, 1868. 

2423. vii. Jonathan Henry Child, b. Eeb., 1872. 
2423«, viii. Emily Alida Child, b. Sept. 29, 1874. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2414. iii. Jonathan Chapman Child, third child and 
second son of Bela and Rosalinda Chapman Child, b. in Thet- 
ford, Vt, April 16, 1817, m. 1848, Emily Eliza Roberts, at 
Rochester, K Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2424. i. George Henky Child. 

2425. ii. Anna Gale Child. 

2426. iii. Emily Child. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2383. vii. Azubah Child, seventh child and third dau. of 
William and Mary Heaton Child, b. Jan. 10, 1790, m. Joseph 
Kinney; she d. in Thetford, Vt., May 9, 1867. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2427. i. Lorenzo Child Kinney, m. Sophia Strong. 

2428. ii. Florus Kinney, m. Laura Southworth, 

2429. iii. Adino Kinney, m. Sabrah Southworth, 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2427. i. Lorenzo Child Kinney, eldest child of Azubah 
Child and Joseph Kinney, m. Sophia Strong. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2430. i. Joseph Child Kinney, m. Louisa Kugg. 

2431. ii. Lorenzo Williston Kinney. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 331 

2432. iii. Lucinda Azubah Kinney. 

2433. iv. Charles Newtom Kinney, in. Mary Sophia Snow. 

2434. v. Harriet Louisa Kinney 

2435. vi. Israel Strom; Kixxey. id. Carrie M Preston. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2430. i. Joseph Child Kinney, eldest child of Lorenzo 
Child Kinney and Sophia Strong, m. Louisa Pugg. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2436. i. George Edward Kixxey. 

2437. ii. Phixeas Child Kixxey. 
2436a. iii. Alice Sophia Kixxey. 
2437a. iv. Linda Mabel Kixxey. 

[Eighth Generation ] 

2433. iv. Charles Newton Kinney, third son and fourth 
child of Lorenzo Child and Sophia Strong Kinney, m. Mary 
Sophia Snow. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2438. i. Gertrude May Kinney. 

2439. ii. Jessie Eveline Kinney. 

2440. iii. Mabel Southworth Kinney. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2435. vi. Israel Strong Kinney, fourth son and sixth 
child of Lorenzo Child and Sophia Strong Kinney, m. Carrie 
M. Preston. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2441. i. Ethel Maud Kinney. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2-428. ii. Florus Kinney, second child, and son of Azubah 
Child and Joseph Kinney, m. Laura Southworth. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2438a. i. Sidney Kinney. 

2439a. ii. Niram Kinney. 

[Seventh Generation. 

2429. iii. Adino Kinney, m. Sabrah Southworth, sister of 
Laura Southworth. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2440a. i. Fanny Fern Kixxey. 

2441a. ii. Lilly Kinney, d. aged 11 months. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2384. viii. Persis Child, eighth child and fourth dau. of 
William and Mary Heaton Child, b. in Thetford. Vt, Jan. 31, 
1792, m. July 5, 1815, Benjamin Maltby. The nephew and 
niece of this Benjamin Maltby married children of Cyril Child, 



332 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

brother of Mrs. Maltbv. Persis Child Maltbv, d. Jan. 5, 18t>5, 

in Thetforil, Vt. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: All died unmarried. 

2442. i. Huldah S. Maltby. b. May 7, 1816, d. Nov. 23, 1833. 

2443. ii. Mary Child Maltby, b. April 23, 1820, d. Nov. 19, 1845. 

2444. iii. William S. Maltby, b. Dee. 20, 1822, disappeared September, 
1844, supposed to have been drowned in Ohio river. 

2445. iv. Nancy M. Maltby, b. Jan. 20, 1824, d. Sept. 21, 1843. 
2446 v. Eber H. Maltby, b. Dec. 21, 1826, d. Oct. 17, 1845. 

2447. vi. Ellen S. Maltby, b. May 14, 1828, d. Dec. 4, 1843. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2387. xi. Rev. Eber Child, eleventh child and youngest 
son of William and Mary Heaton Child, b. in Thetford, Vt , 
July 31, 1798, m. Nancy Tyler, about 1828. Mr. Child 
pursued his academic studies in Randolph Academy, Ver- 
mont, graduated at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, 
and taught for a season in Groton Academy, Massachusetts. 
Studied theology at Andover Theological Seminary, was 
licensed and ordained as an evangelist, settled as pastor in 
Deering, N. H., afterwards in Calais, Me., and in Byron, 
Genesee county, N. Y. A portion of his active life was 
spent in promoting the moral reforms of the day. He was 
scholarly in his attainments, possessing a good knowledge of 
Latin, Greek, Hebrew and French, and had much reputation 
as an elocutionist. Personally he possessed warm social qual- 
ities, with sincere and earnest piety, and was deservedly influ- 
ential among his acquaintances. He died in Fulton, Wis., 
Dec. 15, 1847. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2448. i Mary Elizabeth Child, b. April 7, 1829, d. 1847. 

2449. ii. William Henry Child, b. Sept, 6, 1830, d. in infancy. 

2450. iii Henry Y. Child, b. April 27, 1832, in. Feb. 18, 1858, Angeline 
Adams. 

2451. iv. Francis Brown Child, b. Feb. 22, 1834, m. Feb., 1878, Fran- 
ces M. Cheesbro. 

2452. v. Charles Carrol Child, b. Jan. 9, 1836, d. 1848. 

2453. vi. Frederick Oberlin Child, b. Dec. 15, 1838, m. 1st, Jan. 1, 
1863. Maggie G. Sax; in. 2d, Sept, 19, 1870, Mary Eastman. 

2454 vii. Ellen Louisa Child, b. Sept. 14, 1844. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2450. iii. Henry Y. Child, third child and second son of 
Eev. Eber and Nancy Tyler Child, b. April 27, 1832, m. Feb. 
18, 1858, Angeline Adams, dan. of Thomas and Charlotte 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 333 

Adams, of Jefferson county, Miss.; she was b. June 29, 1837, 
at Vicksburg, Miss. Mr. Child d. Nov. 2, 1876. Mrs. Child 
resides with her family at Vicksburg, Miss. Mr. Child emi- 
grated to the south in early manhood, and established himself 
in the mercantile business in Natchez, Miss. His business was 
prosperous for many years, until the failure of his health. 
He closed his life peacefully after a lingering illness, tenderly 
cared for by his devoted family and kind, sympathizing friends. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
2455 i. Mary Bell Child, b. in Natchez. Miss, Dec. 16, 1858. 

2456. ii. Lotta 0. Child, b. in Natchez, Miss., Oct. 14, 1860. 

2457. iii. Thomas Eber Child, b. in Natchez, Miss., Jan. 22, 1862. 

2458. iv. Brandon Tyler Child, b. at Church Hill. Miss., Oct. 7, 1864, 
d. Oct. 14, 1864. 

2459. v. Fred. Carrol Child, b. at Natchez, Miss., Nov. 18, 1865. 
2460 vi. Annie Buth Child, b. at Natchez. Miss., Jan. 28, 1868. 

2461. vii. Alice Jordan Child, b. at Natchez, Miss., April 16, 1870. 

2462. viii. Ella Lee Child, b. at Natchez, Miss.. April 16, 1871. 

2463. ix. Stella Henrietta Child, b. at Natchez, Miss., March 16, 
1873. 

2464. x. John Clifton Child, b. at Natchez, Miss., May 7. 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2451. iv. Francis Brown Child, fourth child and third 
son of Eev. Eber and Nancy Tyler Child, b. Feb. 22, 1834, m. 
Feb., 1878, Frances M. .Cheesbro. On the breaking out of the 
rebellion Mr. Child enlisted in the 13th Wis. Vol. Kegt. of 
Infantry in the Union army, and served three years. He held 
the office of first lieutenant in the Quartermaster's Guard. He 
is now a farmer in Emerald Grove, Wis. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

2465. i. Carl Victor Child, b. in Emerald Grove, Wis., May 11, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2453. vi. Frederick Oberlin Child, sixth child and fifth 

son of Rev. Eber and Nancy Tyler Child, b. at Dummerston, 

Vt, Dec. 15, 1837; m. twice— 1st, Jan. 1, 1863, Maggie G. 

Sax of Lima, Rock county, Wis.; 2d, Sept. 19, 1870, Mary 

Eastman of Benton Harbor, Mich., dau. of Amos and Sophro- 

nia Eastman. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: By first marriage. 

2466. i. Charles Fremont Child, b. at La Prairie, Wis. 

By second marriage. 

2467. ii. Luella Mary Child, b. at Bradford, Wis., Feb. 2, 1872. 

2468. iii. Maggie Child, b. at La Prairie, Wis., Sept. 2, 1875. 



334 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2469. iv. Henry Y. Child, b. at La Prairie, Wis., Oct, 11, 1876. 

2470. v. Ruthie Sophronia Child, b. at La Prairie, Wis., July 10. 1879. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2372. v. Lucy Child, fifth child and second dan. of 
Col. Jonathan and Dinah Bacon Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, 
Aug. 24, 1763, m. Dr. Israel Newton. They had seven children ; 
no record is obtained of any except Persis. 
[Sixth Generation.] Child: 

2471. i. Persis Newton, m. Ebenezer Boardman. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2471. i. Persis Newton, m. Ebenezer Boardman ; had 
three children, record only of Maria. 
[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

2472. i. Maria Boardman, in. John Loveland of Norwich, Vt, 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2473. i Mary Loveland. 

2474. ii. Lizzie Loveland. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2378. xi. Polly Child, eleventh child and seventh dau. 
of Col. Jonathan and Dinah Bacon Child, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct., Dec 15, 1769, m. Rev. Asa Burton, D. D. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2475. i. Mercy Burton, m. Presbury West. 

2476. ii. , (daughter) m. Skinner. 

2477. iii. , (daughter) m. Lucius Gary of Galesburg, 111. They had 

one daughter, Lizzie Gary. They are now living at Galesburg, 111. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2475. i. Mercy Burton, eldest child of Polly Child and 
Pev. Asa Burton, D. D., m. Presbury West; reside in Lancas- 
ter, N. H. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2476a. i. Presbury West, Jr., m. . 

2477a. ii. Asa Burton West, m. and had four children. 



CHAPTER V. 



PENUEL CHILD. 



In few words we would call the especial attention of the 
reader to the founders of this branch of the Child family. As 
the homes in Connecticut and Massachusetts filled rapidly by 
the large number of children, (a fashion of that date not wholly 
dropped by the name even now, though not universal as of 
yore,) the sons and daughters went out to brave the perils and 
test the joys of pioneer life, as their grand-parents had done 
in coming to America. Indeed, we can but feel that just the 
kind of energy, fortitude, and unconquerableness which char- 
acterized those early Puritans, was an absolute necessity to en- 
able them to attempt obtaining a livelihood from the Granite 
Hills. Nor can we doubt that the prophetic words of the 
Psalmist, and of Isaiah and Joel, were their strong staff : in- 
deed, we can almost hear the sweet- voiced women reading 
those comfortable words. "I will lift up mine eyes unto the 
hills, from whence cometh my help." •'For ye shall go out 
with joy, and be led forth with peace : the mountains and the 
hills shall break forth before you into singing." When the 
crops were like to fail did they not gain courage from these 
further words: "And it shall come to pass in that day that 
the mountains shall drop down new wine, and the hills shall 
flow with milk." Nor can we marvel that looking upon the 
bent frames and toil-worn hands which had wrung by the 
hardest "sweat of the brow "'the small farms from amid the 
rocks, that later generations should joyously turn them to the 
luxuriant prairies and oak-openings of the Western States. 
("Third Generation.] 

•23. ix. Capt. Pexuel Child, sixth son and ninth child of 
Capt. Benjamin and Grace Morris Child, b. in Koxbury, Mass., 
Sept. 3, 1699, m. March 7, 1724, Dorothy Dwight, dau. of 
Rev. Josiah and Mary Partridge Dwight of Woodstock, Ct. 
Rev. Josiah Dwight, father of Mrs. Penuel Child, was in the 
third generation from his earliest American ancestor, John 
Dwight, who came to the Massachusetts colony, in 1634 or 5, 



336 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBURY, MASS. 

with his family then consisting of a wife and three children, 
one of whom was Capt. Timothy Dwight, the father of Kev. 
Josiah Dwight. Capt. Timothy Dwight married Anna Flint 
Dwight, daughter of Kev. Henry Dwight of Braintree, Mass. 
Rev. Josiah Dwight married Mary Partridge, daughter of Col. 
Samuel Partridge, of Hadley, Mass. Rev. Mr. Dwight wa"s 
the first pastor of the Congregational church of Woodstock, Ct., 
(then New Roxbury), being settled there in the summer of 
1690. Rev. Mr. Dwight was a man of strong will, persever- 
ance, and real piety. We sketch thus specifically the parent- 
age of Mrs. Child that test may be made of the proverb that 
" like begets like." Most honorable, and strictly religious, 
fervent and patriotic, w T ere the ancestors of Mrs. Child. We 
claim no less for the projenitors of Mr. Penuel Child, the 
reader must be jury after the perusal of the record which will 
be as fall and correct a portrayal of the descendants as it has 
been possible to obtain. It should be observed that Mrs. Child 
is one remove farther from her emigrating ancestor than her 
husband. We call attention to this fact that those possessing 
the most admirable "Genealogy of the Dwight Family," prepar- 
ed by Rev. Prof. Dwight, D. D., LL.D., of Clinton, NY., may not 
imagine an error. In this work Mr. Child of course takes the 
lead, and in the other Mrs. Child follows her parents. Captain 
and Mrs. Penuel Child resided in Thompson, Ct. From Mr. 
Dwight 1 s Genealogy we quote what he there writes of Captain 
Penuel Child : " He joined the church at Thompson at its or- 
ganization in 1730, and was appointed, as the records state, 
'quorister for us in the public worship.' The gift of song 
was almost universal in the Child name, though none have 
been especially distinguished in the musical profession. Some 
ten children w r ere given to Mr. and Mrs. Child, but Capt. Child 
did not live to see many of them entering upon their own in- 
dependent careers ; he died October 24, 1760. His widow, 
Mrs. Dorothy Dwight Child married on November 24, 1761, 
Robert Goddard of Sutton, Mass. 
[Fourth Generation.] Children : 

2478. i. Josiah Child, b. March 6, 1725, in. twice— 1st, Feb. 6. 1745, 
Sarah Green of Thompson, Ct. ; m. 2d, 1763, Sarah Adams of Killingly, Ct. 

2479. ii. Martha Child, b. Aug. 18, 1726, m. Jan. 31, 1754, Isaac Whit- 
more of Thompson, Ct. 

2480. iii. Eunice Child, b. Oct. 7, 1728, m. March 19, 1749, Seth Hib- 
bert of Thompson, Ct. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 337 

2481. iv. Lois Child, b. April 26, 1730, d. unmarried. 

2482. v. Timothy Child, hap. Dec. 19, 1731. 

2483. vi. Richard Child, bap. March 11, 1733, m. Feb. 1. 1759, Abigail 
Green. 

2484. vii. Silence Child, hap. June 8. 1735, d. Nov. 5, 1840. 

2485. viii. Eleazer Child, hap. Oct. 2, 1737. 
2480. ix Grace Child, hap. Aug. 12, 1739. 

2487. x. Dorothy Child, hap. May 28, 1742. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2378. i. Josiah Child, eldest son and child of Capt. Penuel 
and Dorothy Dwight Child, b. in Thompson, Ct., March 6, 
1725. Mr. Josiah Child was married twice — 1st, Feb. 6, 1745, 
Miss Sarah Green of Thompson, Ct, a dau. of Capt. Henry 
and Judith Guile Green, b. Sept. 21, 1696 ; m. 2d, Sept. 1, 1763, 
Sarah Adams of Killingly, Ct. Mr. Josiah Child, like his 
father, was a tiller of the soil — one of the staid, substantial 
people who have given the old " Nutmeg State " its wide- 
spread repute for shrewd steadiness. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2488. i. Benjamin Child. 

2489. ii. Silence Child, hap. Jan. 10, 1747. d. Nov. 14, 1751. 

2490. iii. Zeruiah (Gervish?) Child, hap. March 18, 1750, d. Dec. 0, 
1754. 

2491. iv. William Child, hap. Nov. 1, 1752. 

2492. v. Silence Child. 2d., hap. Nov. 10, 1754, m. July 7, 1780, John 
Blackman of Woodstock, Ct. 

2493. vi. Penuel Child, b.Feb 22, 1757, m.aht. 1782, Sarah Woodward. 

2494. vii. Jddah Child, hap. March 14, 1758. 
2495 viii. Martha Child, hap. Jan. 14, 1760. 

2496. ix. Dwight Child, b. about 1762. 

2497. x. Jesse Child, b. about 1764. 

2498. xi. Theodoke Child, 1 b. about 1766. 

2499. xii. Michael Child, h. about 1768. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2493. vi. Penuel Child, fourth son and sixth child of 
Josiah and Sarah Green Child, b. Feb. 22, 1757, m. about 1782 
Sarah Woodward, who was b. Oct. 22, 1761. Mr. Penuel 
Child removed with his father to Sand Lake, (now East 
Poestenkill,) Kensselaer county, N. Y., "in the year of the cold 
summer," said to have been the year 1816. Here Mr. Child 
reared a large family, and here he died Jan. 16, 1813. Mrs. 
Sarah W. Child died Dec. 24, 1843. 

1 The record of Theodore Child's family we hope to receive in season for 
the appendix. 



338 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2500. i. Lucinda Child, b. Oct. 17, 1783, m. John Amidon. 

2501. ii. William Child, b. June 17, 1785, m. 1st, Dec. 25, 1809, Zulraa 
Clark; m. 2d, 1833, Sarah Whiting. 

2502. iii. Matilda Child, b. Nov. 7, 1787, m. about 1807, Joseph 
Amidon. 

2503. iv. Dolly Child, b. June 23, 1789, in. Otis Gould. 1 

2504. v. Tryphosa Child, b. April 27, 1792, m. Sept. 14, 1814, William 
Clark. 

2505. vi. Ilura Child, b. Aug. 5, 1794, m. about 1815, David Horton. 

2506. vii. Lyman P. Child, b. Jan. 21, 1797, in. Jan. 5, 1822, Mary 
Gould. 

2507. viii. Jesse Child, b. July 5, 1799, m. about 1827, Sarah Heath. 

2508. ix. Sarah Child, b. Dec. 8, 1803, m.Oct. 8, 1822, Phillip Amidon. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2501. ii. William Child, second child and eldest son of 
Pennel and Sarah Woodward Child, b. June 17, 1785, m. 
twice — 1st, Dec. 25, 1809, Zulyrna Clark, who was b. Oct. 10, 
1792, d. July 26, 1829; m. 2d, 1S33, Sarah Whiting. Mr. 
Child died June 2, 1868. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2509. i. Lydia R. Child, b. July 11, 1811, m. Jan. 13, 1841, Royal South- 
wick. 

2510. ii. William C Child, b. June 25,1815, m. Jan. 18, 1846, Sarah 
Dunham. 

2511. iii. Horace Child, b. June 25, 1817, m. Oct. 21, 1839, Ruby 
Cooley. 

2512. iv. Melvin Child, b. July 26, 1820, m. 1850, Rachel Ann Vosburg. 

2513. v. Minerva F. Child, b. June 17, 1822, m Jan. 8, 1863, Edward 
H. Bennett. 

2514. vi. Ilura Child, b. Nov. 19, 1824. 

2515. vii. Zulyma Child, b. June 18, 1835, d. June 25, 1866. 

2516. viii. Amelia Child, b. July 16, 1836, m. Sherbury Calkins. 

2517. ix. Frances E. Child, b. Nov. 13, 1838, m. Paul Anthony. 

2518. x. Grace E. Child, b. Feb. 26, 1841, m. Charlie Calkins. 

2519. xi. Lucy A. Child, b. Jan. 28, 1843, m. David Richards. 

2520. xii. Sarah J. Child, b. Feb. 17, 1845, m. David Byum. 

2521. xiii. Mary E. Child, b. July 13, 1847, m. John Richmond. 

2522. xiv. Wilbur Child, b. June 1, 1849, m. Paul. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2509. L Lydia R. Child, eldest child of William and 
Zulyma Clark Child, b. July 11, 18 U, m. Jan. 13, 1841, Royal 
Southwick ; reside in Somerset, Niagara county, N. Y. 

'The record of the family of Dolly Child and Otis Gould is not yet ob- 
tained. Should it be sent in season it will be placed in the appendix. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 339 

[Eighth Generation ] Children: . 

2523. i. Alice M. Soutiiwick, b. Aug. 5, 1842, m. March 5, 1863, Wil- 
liam G. Williams. 

2524. ii. Lydia A. Southwick, b. Oct. 21, 1843. 

2525. iii. Mary E. Southwick, b. Nov. 7, 1816, m. Feb. 18, 18G9, Silas 
M. Oliphant. 

2526. iv. Martha J. Southwick, b. Jan. 5, 1850. 

2527. v. Maria L. Southwick, b. Dec. 20, 1851, m. Dec, 20, 1875, An- 
drew Bowers. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2510. ii. William C. Child, eldest son and second child of 
William and Zulvma Clark Child, b. June 25, IS 15, m. Jan. 
18, 1846, Sarah Dunham. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2528. i. George Child, b. June 22, 1849. 

2529. ii. William Child, b. Dec. 24, 1851. 

2530. iii. Eliza Ann Child, b. March 3, 1854, d. Jan. 27, 1865. 

2531. iv. Frank Child, b. July 3, 1858 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2511. iii. Horace Child, second son and third child of 
William and Zulyma Clark Child, b. iu Sand Lake, Rensselaer 
county, N. Y., June 25, 1817, m. Oct. 21, 1839, by George 
Eastman, Esq. to Ruby Cooley. She was b. Dec. 19, 1820, in 
Murray, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

Mr. Horace Child accompained his uncle, Jesse Child, to the 
county of Ashtabula, in Ohio, in the autumn of 1S38. Here 
he found his wife. Soon after his marriage he returned to the 
State of New York, he was, however, not long content, but 
two years sufficied him, and he w T as again in Ohio. On the 
30th November, 1S49. he moved with his family, which consist- 
ed of a wife and four small children, to the township of Rome, 
Ashtabula Co., carrying his household-goods across Grand 
River on the stringers of a floating bridge, moving back into 
a heavy forest, half a mile. His house was fourteen by twenty 
feet, of his own building, cutting away the trees so they would 
not fall upon the house in the high winds ; driving his cow 
and a few sheep nine miles round to get them to his new home. 
Then he began clearing off his farm, and as he had no team, 
he was obliged to draw his logs out from the woods by hand. 
But endowed with wonderful energy and perseverance, he suc- 
ceeded in winning for his famil}- a pleasant home and comfort. 
The hardships he endured bore heavily upon him, and before 



340 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

the three-score he passed peacefully to his death, — March 7, 
1874, aged 56 years, 8 months and 10 days, leaving a wife and 
eight children to mourn the loss of a kind husband and in- 
dulgent parent. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2532. i. William R. Childs, b. Sept. 21, 1840, in. Feb. 19, 1876, Ann 
E. Gould. 

2533. ii. Synthia J. Childs, b. Oct. 11, 1842, in. Jan. 1, 1863, Myron L. 
Dntton. 

2534. iii. Marietta L. T. Childs. b. Jan. 29, 1846, in Sheffield, Ohio. 

2535. iv. Oren H. Childs, b. April 23, 1848, m. Aug. 15, 1867, Josie 
Alderman. 

2536. v. Alice M. Childs, b. Oct. 30, 1850, m. May 25. 1875, Benjamin 
Baker. 

2537. vi. Melvin A. Childs, ) H ( b. Feb. 6, 1854. d. Nov. 23, 1874, in 

[- 2. •] Rome, Ohio. 

2538. vii Mary A. Childs, ) ° ( b. Feb. 6, 1854. 

2539. viii. Nelson P. Childs, b. May 20, 1856, in Rome, Ashtabula Co., 
Ohio. 

2540. ix. Hiram F. A. Childs, b Mch. 30, 1859, in Rome, Ashtabula 
Co., Ohio. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2532. i. William K Childs, eldest child of Horace and 
Ruby Cooley Child, b. in Sheffield, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1840, m. 
by Noah Haskins, Esq., in Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 
Feb. 19. 1876, to Ann E. Gould. She was b. June 13, 1S38, in 

Burton, Ohio. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2541. i. Horace M. Childs, b. Jan. 11, 1877 d. Jan. 29, 1877. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2533. ii. Synthia J. Childs, eldest dau. and second child 
of Horace and Ruby Cooley Child, b. in Pembroke, Genesee 
Co., N. Y., Oct. 11, 1842, m. by Rev. E. Johnston, in Rome, 
Ohio, Jan. 1, 1863, to Myron L. Dutton, who was b. Aug. 17, 
1840. Mrs. Synthia J. Childs Dutton d. in Thompson, Geauga 
Co., Ohio, Nov. 22, 1870, se. 28. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2542. i. Infant Son, unchristened, b.Dec. 10, 1863, d. Dec. 24, 1863. 

2543. ii. Dora A. Dutton, b. Feb. 14, 1865, in Thompson, Geauga Co., 
Ohio. 

2544. iii. Walter Dutton, b. Oct. 22, 1867, in Denmark, Ohio. 

2545. iv. Minnie Dutton, b. Feb. 15, 1870, in Thompson, Ohio. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2535. iv. Oren H. Childs, second son and fourth child of 
Horace and Ruby Cooley Child, b. in Sheffield, Ohio, April 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 341 

23, 1848, m. by Eev. P. P. Pinney, in Willoughby, Lake Co., 

Ohio, Aug. 15, 1867, to Josie Alderman, who was b. June 5, 

1845. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2546. i. Katy J. Childs, 1>. May 7, 1871. in Orwell, Ohio, d. Jan. 27, 
187G, in Rome, Ohio. 

2547. ii. Wheaton Childs, b. Dee 1, 1874, in Kirtland, Lake Co., Ohio, 
d. March 24. 1878, in Denmark, Ohio. 

254S. iii. Wina CiiiLDs, b. June 13, 1877, in Rome, Ashtabula Co., Ohio 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2536. v. Alice M. Childs, third dan. and fifth child of 
Horace and Ruby Cooley Childs, b. in Rome, Ashtabula Co., 
Ohio. Oct. 30, 1850, m. by Charles Babcock, Esq., in the same 
town, May 25, 1875, to Benjamin Baker. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 
2540. i. Cora M. Baker, b. Dee 27. 1876, in Orwell, Ashtabula Co., Ohio. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2512. iv. Melvin Child, third son and fourth child of 
William and Zulyma Clark Child, b. July 26, 1820, m. 1850, 
Rachel Ann Vosburg. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2550. i. Emily Child, b. June 5, 1851, in Berlin. Wis. 

2551. ii. Ella Child, b. June 7, 1853, m. Sept., 1879, Mr. Jackson. 

2552. iii Ernest Child, b. July 1858. m. Sept. 1878, Kittie Clough. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2502. iii. Matilda Child, second dau. and third child of 
Penuel and Sarah Woodward Child, b. Nov. 7, 1787, in Rens- 
selaer Co., N. Y., m. about 1807, Joseph Amidon, b. 1782, d. 
1846. Mrs. Matilda Child Amidon d. Dec. 23, 1833. Resided 
in Rensselaer Co., N. Y., where all their children were born. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2547a. i. Cyrus Amidon. b. Aug. 13, 1808, m. 1822, Maria Uretta Crop- 
sey; he d. Dec. 14, 1857. 

2548a. ii. Martin Amidon, b. Sept. 9, 1812, m. July 12, 1834, Polly 
Burritt. 

2549«. iii. Ilura Amidon, b. Jan. 27, 1815, m. 1st, Sept. 1833, Barney 
Clapper: m. 2d, 1838, John Wyland. 

2550a. iv. Sophia Amidon, b. Jan. 21, 1817, m. 1835, Seely Burritt. 

2551«. v. Dexter A. C. Amidon, b. April 9, 1819, m. May 1, 1839, 
Ma randy Cropsey. 

2552a. vi. Joseph P. Amidon, b. Feb. 17, 1822, m. Feb. 15, 1844, Weal- 
thy A. Wright. 



342 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2504. v. Triphosa Child, fourth dan. of Permel and Sarah 
Woodward Child, b. April 27, 1792, m. Sept. 14, 1814, Wil- 
liam B. Clark. Mrs. T. Child Clark, d. July 27, 1873. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2553. i. Alonzo Clark, b. June 2, 1815, m. Feb. 8, 1840, Mary Ann 
Blood. 

2554. ii. Claramond M. Clark, b. March 31, 1817, m. July 1, 1838, John 
Dunham. 

2555. iii. Alvin Clark, b. Aug. 26, 1818. 

2556. iv. William Clark, b. Sept, 5, 1819. m. Jan. 1, 1846, Sarah Dun- 
ham. 

2557. v. Freeman Clark, b. July 12, 1821. 

2558. vi. Edward Clark, b. June 26, 1823, m Dec. 27, 1845, Sabrina M. 
Bennett ; residence Chesening, Mich. 

2559. vii. Zephaniah Clark, b. Jan. 7, 1826. 

2560. viii. Matilda Clark, b. Feb. 10, 1828. 

2561. ix. Ilura Clark, b. Nov. 1,1829. 

2562. x. George Clark, b. Nov. 1, 1832, d. Dec. 8, 1875. 

2563. xi. Abel R. Clark, b. Sept. 20, 1834, m. Sept. 4, 1867, Susan 
Rowley; residence Carlton, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2553. i. Eev. Alonzo Clark, eldest child of Tryphosa 
Child and William B. Clark, b. June 2, 1815, m. Feb. 8, 1840, 
Mary Ann Blood. Mr. Clark is a Methodist clergyman; resi- 
dence Carleton, Orleans Co., N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2564. i. Mehitable Tryphosa Clark. 

2565. ii. Orrin Clark. 
2566 iii. George Clark. 

2567. iv. Mary Clark. 

2568. v. Hattie Clark. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2554. ii. Claramond M. Clark, eldest dan. and second 

child of Tryphosa Child and William B. Clark, b. March 31, 

1817, m. July 1, 183S, John Dunham; reside in Montrose, 

Mich. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2569. i. Sarah Minerva Dunham. 

2570. ii. George Dunham. 

2571. iii. Russel Dunham, d. in the army. 

2572. iv. Morris Dunham. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2556. iv. William Clark, third son and fourth child of 
Tryphosa Child and William B. Clark, b. Sept. 5, 1819, m. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 343 

Jan. 1, 1S46. Sarah Dunham : reside in Carleton, Orleans Co., 

N. Y. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2573. i. De Witt Clark. 

2574. ii. Mary Clare. 

2575. iii. Allie Clark. 
257G. iv. William Clark, Jh. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2505. vi. Ilura Child, fifth dan. and sixth child of Pennel 
and Sarah Woodward Child, b. Aug. 5, 1794, in Kensselaer 
Co., N. Y., m. about 1815, David Horton. Mrs. Ilura Child 
Horton d. about 1 822. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 
25736. i. Melissa Horton, b. 1816. 
25746. ii. David Horton, b. 1818. 
25756. iii. Mary Horton, b. 1820 
25766. iv. Ilura Horton, b. 1822. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2506. vii. Lyman P. Child, second son and seventh child 
of Penuel and Sarah Woodward Child, b in Sand Lake, N. Y., 
Jan. 21, 1797, m. Jan. 5, 1822, Mary Gould, dau. of Bezaleel 
Gould, formerly of Woodstock, Ct, who was b. Sept. 1, 1S02. 
Mr. Child moved to Genesee Co., 1ST. Y., and settled upon a 
farm in the parish of Corfu. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2577. i. Darius Child, b. Sept. 4, 1822, in May 28, 1848, Charlotte E. 
Patterson. 

2578. ii. Lucinda Child, b. April 21, 1824, in. March 18, 1840, Norman 
L. Knox. 

2579. iii. Alpha Child. 1> April 4, 1827, in. Feb. 9, 1850, Martha B. 
Wigent. 

2580. iv. George Child, b. Aug. 14, 1829, d. March 27, 1849, in Pem- 
broke, N. Y. 

2581. v. Emeline Child, b. Aug. 13, 1831, d. Aug. 27, 1831, in Pem- 
broke, X. Y. 

2582. vi. Clark Child, b. Aug. 16, 1833, m. 1855, Mary A. E. Campbell. 

2583. vii. Ophir Child, b. Aug. 17, 1835, d. May 1, 1854, in Pembroke, 
N. Y. 

2584. viii. William Eaton Child, b. Nov. 1, 1837, m. Nov. 20, 1858, 
Emeline Wigent, dau. of Samuel Wigent. 

2585. ix. Otis Child, b. April 4, 1842, d. in the army, during the war of 
the rebellion, March, 1862. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2577. i. Darius Child, eldest child of Lyman P. and Mary 
Gould Child, b. in Batavia, N. Y., Sept. 4, 1822, m. May 28, 
1848, Charlotte E. Patterson ; resides in Ohio. 



344 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2586. i. George Thomas Child, b. June 13, 1849. 

2587. ii. Juliette Isabella Child, b. May 8, 1852. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2578. ii. Lucinda Child, eldest dan. of Lyman P. and 
Mary Gould Child, b. in Pembroke, Genesee Co., K Y., April 
21, 1824, m. March 18, 1840, Norman L. Knox, who was b. 
Jan. 25, 1820. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2588. i. John T. Knox, b. April 18, 1841. 

2589. ii. Frederick W. Knox, b. Jan 7. 1843. 

2590. iii. Eliza A. Knox, b. Jan. 15, 1845. 

2591. iv. Norman L. Knox, Jr., b. Aug. 27, 1847. 

2592. v. George L. Knox, b. July 12, 1850. 

2593. vi. James P. Knox, b. May 21, 1852. 

2594. vii. Myron W. Knox, b. May 1, 1855. 

2595. viii. Gilbert H. Knox, b. March 2, 1857. 

2596. ix. Darius C. Knox, b. Jan. 27, 1858. 

2597. x. Mary E. A. Knox, b. Jan. 27, 1859. 

2598. xi. Ida B. Knox, b. March 6, 1861. 

2599. xii. Adelbert D. Knox, b May 19, 1863. 

2600. xiii. Willie Knox, b. March 10, 1866. 

2601. xiv. Rosa L. Knox, b. Aug. 12, 1867. 

2602. xv. Edward E. Knox, b. Sept, 13, 1870. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2579. iii. Alpha Childs, second son and third child of 
Lyman P. and Mary Gould Childs, b. in Pembroke, N". Y., 
April 4, 1827, m. Feb. 9, 1S50, Martha B. Wigent, who was b. 
June 9, 1833. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2603. i. Rosett A. Childs, b. Dec. 19, 1851, m. Jan. 1, 1868, John Mc- 
Millan. 

2604. ii. Mary A. Childs, b. Feb. 14. 1853, m. Sept, 13, 1871. John C. 
Miller. 

2605. iii. Dwigiit F. Childs, b Sept, 27, 1855. 

2606. iv. Charles A. Childs, b. Aug. 17, 1856. 

2607. v. Lyman E. Childs, b. July 8, 1859. 

2608. vi. William J. Childs, b. May 31, 1867. 

2609. vii. Martha E. Childs. b. Dec. 26, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2582. vi. Clark Childs, fourth son and sixth child of 
Lyman P. and Mary Gould Child, b. in Pembroke, N. Y., 
Aug. 16, 1833, m. about 1S55, Mary A. E. Campbell, dau. of 
Homer Campbell, she was b. Aug. 31, 1S34, in Barry, Orleans 
county, N. Y.; reside in Corfu, N. Y. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 345 

[Eighth Generation.] Children; 

2610. i. George L. Childs, b. April 25, 1856, d. same day in Pembroke, 
X. V 

2611. ii. Keziah L. Childs, b. July 24, 1*57. d. Sept. 22, L858, in Pem- 
broke. X.Y. 

2612 iii. Ai.HKKT L. Child-, b. Sept. 26. 1859, in Pembroke, X. Y. 
2613. iv. Chahi.es K. Child-, l>. Sept. 2, 1863, in Pembroke, X. V. 

Sixth Generation.J 

2507. viii. Jesse Child, third son and eighth child ol 
Penuel and Sarah Woodward Child, b. in Williamstown, Mass., 
July 5, 1799. m. about 1827, Sarah Heath, who d. Jan. 8. 1873: 
lie resided in Ohio and Michigan. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

•2614. i. Sarah E. Child, b. March IS, 1829, m. Nov. 16, 1848, Alexan- 
der M. Johnson. 

2615. ii. Henrietta Child, b. July 4, 1831, d. Oct. 29, 1842. 

2616. iii. Matilda Child, b. March 28. 1834, d. April 23, 1834. 

2617. iv. Simon P. Child, b. Dec. 27, 1836, d. in the army Jan. 6. 186:;. 

2618. v. Irvin J. Child, b. Aug. 10, 1839, m. 1st, Dec. 12, 1867. Jane 
Briggs: m. 2d. April 24. 1873, Elizabeth R. Briggs. 

2619. vi. Mary E. Child, b. July 11. 1841, m. Theodore Metcalf; she d. 
Jan. 1. 1857. 

2620. vii. James W. Child, b. Nov. 2. 1843. 
26-21. viii. Martha A. Child, 1.. Aug. 6, 1846. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2 til 4. i. Sarah E. Child, eldest child of Jesse and Surah 
Heath Child, b. in Barry. Orleans county, X. Y.. March 18, 
1829. in. Nov. 16, 1848. Alexander M. Johnson ; resides in 

East Rockport, Ohio. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2622. i. Sarah Minerva Johnson, b. Sept. 30, 1849, in Ashtabula, Ohio. 

•2623. ii. Alfred A. Johnson, b. Nov. 17, 1853, in Paw Paw, Mich. 

2624. iii. Jame- M. Johnson, b. March 27, 1857, in Paw Paw. Mich. 

2625. iv. Lawrence T.Johnson, b Oct. 28, 1859. in Bay City, Mich. 

2626. v. Walter B. Johnson, b. Dec. 21, 1862, in Bay City, Mich. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2618. v. Irvin J. Child, second son and fifth child of Jesse 
and Sarah Heath Child, b. in Ashtabula, Ohio. Aug. 10. 1839, 
in. twice — 1st, in Howell. Mich.. Dec. 12. 1867, Jane Briggs; 
in. 2d, April 24. 1873. Elizabeth Rosling Briggs, both daugh- 
ters of Thomas and Grace Briggs; resides in Fairfield, CI a) 

county. Nebraska 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

•2627. i. Jesse Child, b. Sept. 4, 1870, in Howell, -Mich. 

2628. ii. Anna Child, b. Aug. 2. 1872. in Howell, Mich 
A-1 



346 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2508. ix. Sarah Child, sixth dan. and ninth child of Penuel 
and Sarah Woodward Child, b. Dec. 8, 1803, in Sand Lake. 
N. Y* m. in Batavia, N. Y., Oct. 8, 1822, Phillip Amidon, 
who was b. Aug. J 5, 1799, in Keene, New Hampshire; son of 
Philip and Jerusha Smith Amidon. Mrs. Sarah Child Amidon 
died Julv 11. 1867. Residence East Pembroke, Genesee Co., 
N. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2629. i. Otis Amidon, b. Sept. 4, 1823, in. Oct. 7, 1847, Grace Cooley. 

2630. ii. George Amidox, b. Aug. 22, 1825, d. Aug. 22, 1825. in Pem- 
broke, N. Y. 

2631. iii. Harriet Amidox. b. May 16, 1827, d. Jan. 21, 1834. in Pern 
broke. N. V. 

2632. iv. Malixda Amidox. b. Meh. 24, 1830. in. Jan. 1, 1849, Tchabod 
J. Case. 

2633. v. Marvin C. Amidon, b. May 24. 1832, in. Oct. 26. 1854, Susan 
Fishell. 

2634. vi. Matilda J. Amidox, b. Nov. 11, 1834, m. April 5, 1852, Albert 
Cups. 

2635. vii. Albert Amidox. b. Jan. 2. 1837, iu. Meh. 12, 1868, Nancy J. 
Baker. 

2636. viii. Harriet A. Amidox, b. Dec. 27, 1839, in. Feb. 2. 1859, John 
Gowdy. 

2637. ix. Sarah A. Amidox, b. July 15, 1842. A teacher. 

2638. x. Cyrus P. Amidox, !». May 19, 1845, in. Oct, 4, 1867, Mary Brown. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2629. i. Otis Amidon, eldest child of Sarah Child and 
Philip Amidon, b. in Batavia, 1ST. Y., Sept, 4. 1823, in. Oct. 7, 
1847, Grace Coolev, who was b. in Yates Co., N. Y.. Mav 25, 
1820. Mr. Amidon died Sept. 29, 1864. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2639. i. Sarah A. Amidon, b. July 5. 1848, d. July 30, 1848. 

2640. ii. Mary J. Amidon, b. Meh. 30, 1850, in. Dec. 23, 1875, Julius 
Ingalsbee. 

2641. iii. George E. Amidon, b. June 11, 1852. 

2642. iv. Alice J. Amidon, b. Sept, 28, 1855. 

2643. v. Elmer O. Amidon, b. April 9. 1861. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2640. ii. Mary J. Amidon, second dau. of Otis and Grace 

Cooley Amidon, and granddaughter of Sarah Child Amidon, 

b. Meh. 30, 1850, m. Dec. 23. 1875, Julius Ingalsbee, who was 

b. Dec. 16, 1851. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2644. i. Fraxk Ingalsbee, l>. Sept. 14, 1876. 

2645. ii. Eugene Ixgalsbee. b. Jan. 26, 1878. 



ANI > II IS I ) KS( • K X I ) A NTS. 341 

[Seventh Generation, j 

2632. iv. Malinda Amidon, second dau. and fourth child 
of Sarah Child and Philip Amidon, b. in Pembroke, N. Y.. 
Mch. 24, 1830, m. Jan. 1. lSlH. [chabod J. Case, who was b. 

Feb. 24, 1829. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2646. i. Marvin J. Case, b. Nov. 24, 1S49, .1. Sept. 10, 1851. 

2647. ii. Helen L. Case, b. Sept. 18, 1851, m. July 4, 1870. Frederick 
Sunricker, 

2648. iii. Sarah A. Case, b. Feb. 5, 1854, in. Dee. 31, 1871, Albert King. 

2649. iv. Louis Case, b. Jan. 13, 1856, m. Dec. 31, 1879, Lizzie Carlisle. 

2650. v. Phillip J. Case, 1.. July 17. 1868. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2647. ii. Helen L. Case, eldest dau. of Ichabod J. and 
Malinda Amidon Case, and granddaughter of Sarah Child and 
Phillip Amidon, b. Sept. 18, 1851. m. July 4. 1870, Frederick 

Sunricker, who was b. Oct. 12. 1843. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children. 

2651. i. Jay D. Sunricker, b. Oct, 6, 1872. 

2652. ii. Willie M. Sunricker, b. Mch. 12, 1874. 

2653. iii. Lewis J. Sunricker. b. April 4, 1876. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

264S. iii. Sarah A. Case, second dau. and third child of 
Ichabod and Malinda Amidon Case, and granddaughter of 
Sarah Child Amidon, b. Feb. 5, 1854. m. Dec. 31, 1871, Albert 
King, who was b. Nov. 18, 1848. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2654. i. Sylvia J. King, b. Nov. 24, 1872. 

2655. ii. John J. King, b. Oct, 6, 1873. 

2656. iii. Melinda H. King, b. Mch. 12. 1876. 

2657. iv. Linda C. King, b. Feb. 12, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2633. v. Marvin Child Amidon, third son and fifth child 
of Sarah Child and Phillip Amidon, b. in Pembroke, N. Y., 
May 24. 1832, m. Oct, 26. 1854, Susan Fishell, who was b. 
Out. 25, 1835. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2658. i. Frank Amidon, b. Feb. 8, 1858, ra. Nov. 1, 1878, Emma Tucker, 
who was b. Oct. 20, 1862. 

2659. ii. John Amidon, b. Oct. 28, 1871, in Pembroke, N. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2H34. vi. Matilda J. 'Amidon, third dau. and sixth child 
of Sarah Child and Phillip Amidon. b. in Pembroke, N. Y.. 



348 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Nov. 11. 1834. m. April 5, 1852. Albert Cups, who was b. 
Jan. 4, 1831. Mrs. Matilda J. A. Cups died July 14, 1874. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2660. i. Orra S. Cups, b. July 24, 1855. in. Nov. 20. 1872. Frank Cropsy. 

2661. ii. George Cups, b. Aug. 23. 1858. 

2662. iii. William Cups, b. June 13, 1863. 
'2663. iv. Nellie Cups. b. July 4, 1865. 

2664. v. Bertie Cups, b. Oct. 20, 1868. 

2665. vi. LuRA Cups, b. July 4. 1875. 

[Eighth Generation. 

2660. i. Orra S. Curs, eldest child of Matilda J. Aniidon 

and Albert Cups, and granddaughter of Sarah Child Amidon, 

b. July 24, 1855, m. Nov. 20. 1872. Frank Cropsy, who was 

b. Oct 27, 1842. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2666. i. Musa Cropsy, b. Oct. 25, 1873. 

2667. ii. Mina Cropsy, b. Feb. 16,1875. 

2668. iii. Court T. Cropsy, b. Meh. 12, 1877. 

2669. iv. Frank G. Cropsy, b. Nov. 17, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2635. v.ii. Albert Amidon. fourth son and seventh child 
of Sarah Child and Philip Amidon, b. in Pembroke, N. Y., 
Jan. 2, 1837, m. Mch. 12, 1868, Nancy J. Baker, who was b. 
Feb. 4, 1852. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2670. i. Bertie Amidon, b. May 24, 1869. 

2671. ii. Warren E. Amidon, b. Mch. 26, 1871. 

2672. iii. Vesta P. Amidon. b. Oct. 24, 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2636. viii. Harriet A. Amidon, fourth dau. and eighth 
chihl of Sarah Child and Phillip Amidon. b. in Pembroke, 
X. Y.. Dec. 27, 1839, m. Feb. 2. 1859, John Gowdy, who was 

b. July 23, 1833. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2673. i. Levi Gowdy, b. Dec. 2, 1859. 

2674. ii. Eva E. Gowdy, b. Jan. 4, 1867. 

2675. iii. Jessie Gowdy. b. Aug. 1. 1871. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2638. x. Cyrus P. Amidon, youngest child of Sarah Child 
and Phillip Amidon. b. in Pembroke, N. Y., May 19, 1845, 
m. Oct, 4, 1867, Mary Brown, who was b. June 20, 1846. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

2676. i. Nellie Amidon, b. July 15. 1868. 



AVI) HIS DESCENDANTS. 349 

[Fifth Generation.] 

24HS. iii. Theodore Child, third son and child of Josiah 
and Surah Green Child, was b. abt. 1766, married and had the 
following children, but we cannot obtain further knowledge 
of the family. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2677. i. John Child. 

2678. ii. Luther Child. 

2679. iii. George Child. 

2680. iv. Nathaniel Child. 

[Fourth Generation. | 

2479. ii. Martha Child, eldesl dan. and second child ol 
Capt. Pennel and Dorothy Dwight Child, b. in Thompson, Ct., 
Aug. 18. 1726, m. Jan. 31, 1754, Isaac Whitmore of that town. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitmore were the parents of thirteen children. 
of whom we can only obtain the record of three. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2681. i. Tamar Whitmore, bapt. Feb. 2. 1755. 
:5G82. ii. Sabra Whitmore, bapt. Mch. 24, 1756. 

2683. iii. Jabez Whitmore. bapt. Feb. 12, 1758. in. Sept. 20, 1781, Miss 
Hannah Lamed. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2480. iii. Eunice Child, second dan. and third child of 
Capt. Penuel and Dorothy Dwight Child, b. in Thompson, Ct., 
Oct. 7. 1728. m. in the same place, Mch. 19. 1749, Mr. Seth 
Hibbert. 

Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2684. i. Lois Hibbert, bapt. Sept. 2, 1750. 

2685. ii. Gervish Hibbert. b. April 15, 1755. 

2686. iii. Elisha Hibbert, b. Jan. 13, 1758. 

2687. iv. Aaron Hibbert, b. Feb. 1, 1761. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2488. vi. Richard Child, third son and sixth child of Capt. 
Penuel and Dorothy Dwight Child, b. in Thompson, Ct,, Mch. 
11, 1733. m. Feb. 1. 1759, Abigail Green, dan. of Capt, Henry 
and Judith Guile Green, of Thompson, Ct. She was b. at Kill- 
ingly. Ct, May 7, 1738, d. Aug. 1, 1830, aged 92 years. 2 mo. 
24 d. Richard Child died in 1781. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

2688. .. Timothy Child, b. Mch. 17. 1760, bapt. -Line 23, 1760, in. May 
15, 1788, Amy Parish. 

2689. ii. Hannah Child, b. July 14, 1762, in. Ezra Child, son of Peter 
Child of Woodstock. Ct., <l. Nov. 29, 1844. Recorded with her husband. 



350 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBUEY, MASS. 

2690. iii. Eunice Child, b. July 10, and bapt. July 15, 1704, in. 1st, Mr. 
Creates; 2d. Jan. 29, 1792, Ebenezer Demming. 

2691. iv. John Child, b. Men. 11, 1766, and bapt, Sept. 7, m. Nov. 15, 
1792, Martha Hutchins. 

2692. v. Mary Child, b. Jan. 22, 1770, in. Jan. 3, 1795, Ebenezer Sanborn. 

2693. vi. Abigail Child, b. July 14, 1771. m. Nov. 27, 1794, Samuel 
West. 

2694. vii. Rosk Anna Child, b. Dec 30. 1773, in. Jan. 1, 1794, Samuel 
Hutchins. 

2695. viii. Dudley Child, b. May 7, 1776, in. April 24, 1800, Molly Weeks ; 
m. 2d, Mrs. Nancy Child, dan. of Capt. Willard Child and widow of Elisha 
Child. 

2696. ix. Matilda Child, b. Aug. 8, 1778, m. May 15,1798, David Weeks. 

2697. x. Martha Child, b. abt. 1780. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

268S. i. Timothy Child, eldest son and child of Richard 
and Abigail Green Child, b. in Thompson, Ct., Mch. 17, 1760, 
m. May 15, 1788, Miss Amy Parish, who was b in 1764. 

Mi\ Timothy Child, like most of his name who were of suffi- 
cient age, entered personally into the heroic struggle for national 
enfranchisement, and lived to enjoy the fruit of the victory, in 
the peaceful prosperity which speedily resulted. After his 
decease, his widow received a small pension in recognition of 
his services in the Revolutionary contest. In 1799 Mr. and 
Mrs. Child with their children, then numbering six, removed 
to Sullivan Co., New York. Here they labored, clearing off 
the forest trees, to make for themsel ves a home and farm, endur- 
ing man)' hardships unknown to the pioneer of to-day. " The 
first school established in the place, - ' writes his youngest sou, 
'•was organized by my father's benevolence, in procuring a 
teacher and a few spelling-books. No grist mill nearer than 
Bloomingburgh, a distance of some sixteen miles, the road to 
which would now be hard travelling for a wood-road." The 
strong attachments to the New England homes, were every- 
where evidenced in the repetition of the names of towns and 
hamlets, which were themselves in memoriam of the far away 
motherland. Mr. Timothy Child was no exception to this 
general local attachment, and gave to his new home in Sullivan 
county the name of his native place in Connecticut. After a 
life of honor and usefulness, Mr. Child died, Feb. 5, 1825. His 
widow survived him some twenty years, dying July 5, 1845. 
[Sixth Generation] Children: 

2698. i. Laurinda Child, b. May 22, 1789. in. April 19. 1807, Benjamin 
Lord, of Newark, N. J. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 351 

2699. ii. Bradley Child, i>. 1790, d. al the age of 21, in Riverton, N. .1. 

2700. Hi. Richard Dwight Child, b. Sept. 1. 1792, m. 1st, Feb. 20, 1817, 
Mary Andrews; in. 2d, Dec. 13, 1857, Abigail Andrews. 

2701. iv. Obadiah Child, b. Dec. 25, 1794, ra. Maj 9, 1815, Charity 
Thompson. 

2702. v. Abigail Child, b. 1 T'.HJ. d. young, in Sullivan Co., X. Y. 

2703. vi. Akchippus P. Child, b. Dec. 31, 1797, in. Dec. 27, 1818, Mar- 
garet Sax. 

2704. vii. Abigail Child, 2nd, b. Jan. 8, 1800, m. Mch. 25, 1821, Nathan 
Anderson. 

2705. viii. James Bbigham Chili., .Ii. Dec. 21. 1802, m. 1st, 1826, Ann 
Willsie: m. '2d, 1801, Mrs. Weston. 

2706. ix. JohnG. Child, b. Oct. 10, 1805, m. 1st, 1829, Lois Ann Grant; 
in. 2d, May Hi, 1875. Mrs. Iloyt. 

| Si\t h Generation. ] 

2698. i. Laukinda Child, eldest child of Timothy and Amy 
Parish Child, b. in Thompson, Ct„, May 22. 1780, m. April 19, 
1807, Benjamin Lord, son of John Lord of Thompson, Sullivan 
Co., N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lord shared life for forty-seven years, most of 
this time resident in the State of New Jersey, carefully edu- 
cating and training a large family into mature vears, before 
death came to break up the home. Mr. Lord died near Tren- 
ton, N. J., May 27, 1854. Mrs. Laurinda Child Lord survived 
her husband some seventeen years ; attaining her own rest 
Jan. 9, 1871, when past fourscore. For a time Mr. and Mrs. 
Lord resided near Rahway, N. J., and here their first child was 
bom ; while he was an infant they removed to the immediate 
vicinity of Trenton. N. J., and the other eight children were 
born near or in that city. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2707. i. William G. Lord, b. Feb. 7, 1809, m. 1st, Mch. 23, 1837. Anna 
Margaret Beach, who d. July 7, 1841: ra. 2d, Jan. 11. 1843, Elizabeth H. 
Hays. 

2708. ii. John Allen Lord. 1>. Feb. 4, 1811, m. Nov. 1843, Amelia 
Morton. 

2709. iii. Richard D. Lord, 1». Jan. 24, 1813, m. Jan. 24. 1838, Jane 
( 'apner. 

2710. iv. Ebenezer Bradley Lord, b. May 2, 1816, m. 1st, July 15, 1844. 
Mary Ann Hays, who d. June 9, 1850; m. 2d, June 20, 1855. Elinira Hays. 

2711. v. Benjamin Lord, b. Aug. 21, 1819, in. 1st, May 23, 1843. Amanda 
Potter, who d. May 31, 1870; m. 2d, Dee. 6, 1871, Julia Fowler. 

2712. vi. Laurinda Lord, 1>. Nov. 9, 1821, d. Sept. 6,1825, ae. 4 yrs 2 mo- 
3 day-. 

2713. vii. Timothy W. Lord, b. Jan. 22, 1824, m. 1st, June 3, 1846, 
Martha Hornell, who d. June 9. 1877; m. 2d, June 19, 1878. Ellen Fowler- 



352 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2714. viii. Hezekiah T. Lord, b. Sept. It, 1826. in. June 4, 1844, Emma 
M. Seinor. 

2715. ix. Mary Laurinda Loed, b. Oct. 4, 1828. in. Nov. 18. 1851, Arthur 
Hornell. 

[Seventh (feneration. J 

2707. i. William G. Lord, eldest son and child of Laurin- 
da Child and Benjamin Lord, b. near Rah way, N. J., Feb. 7, 
1809. Has been twice married — 1st, Mch. 23. 1837, Anna 
Margaret Beach, dau. of Cyrenus and Mary Beach, all of New- 
ark, N. J. Mrs. Anna M. B. Lord d. July 7, 1841, leaving an 
infant only four weeks old. Mr. Lord m. 2d, Jan. 11, 1843, 
Elizabeth H. Hays, dau. of Michael and Elizabeth Hays, of 
Burlington, N. J. When about 22 years of age Dr. Lord went 
to Philadelphia, Pa., and studied dentistry ; in March. 1834, he 
went to Newark, N. J., and opened a dental office. In the 
constant and successful pursuit of this profession Dr. Lord has 
passed the years succeeding, always residing in Newark. To 
Dr. William G. Lord we are indebted for this record of his 
mother and her descendants : 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2716. i. Anna Maugaret Lord, b. June 12, 1841, in. Mch. 17, 1870, 
Charles A. Boucher. 

2717. ii. William G. Lord, Jr., b. Jan. 22. 1844, in. Feb. 17, 1876, 
Mariah Louisa Sellers, dau. of Robert E. and Mariah L. Sellers, of Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

2718. iii. Elizabeth Hays Lord, b. Aug. 2. 1845, m. Oct. 19. 1870, 
Horace S. Squier. 

2719. iv. Laurinda Amanda Lord, b. Nov. 28. 1847, d. Mch. 12. 1866, 
very suddenly, when visiting in Pittsburg, Pa. 

2720. v. Mary Ann Augusta Lord, b. Oct. 6, 1849. 

2721. vi. Carrie Frances Lord, b. Feb. 5. 1852. 

2722. vii. Frank Howard Lord, b. Sept. 21, 1854. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2716. i. Anna Margaret Lord. dau. of Dr. William G. 
and Anna Margaret Beach Lord, and granddaughter of Lau- 
rinda Child Lord, b. in Newark, N. J, June 12, 1841, m. Mch. 
17, 1860, Charles A. Boucher. Through deep waters has Mrs. 
Boucher been called to pass, five children have been given her, 
only to be transplanted to the heavenly gardens, and last her 
husband has entered into rest, leaving her a childless widow, in 
February, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2718. iii. Elizabeth Hays Lord, eldest dau. of Dr. Wil- 
liam G. and Elizabeth H. Hays Lord, and granddaughter of 



ANIi HIS DESCENDAN - 3f I 

Laurinda Child Lord, b. in Newark, N. J.. Aug. 2, L84.5, m. 
Oct. 19, 1870, Horace S. Squier, of Newark. 
[ Ninth Generation.] Children : 

2723. i. Sheldon Squier. 

2724. ii. Lizzie Squier. 

[Seventh Generation. | 

2708. ii. John Allen Lord, second sun and child of Lau- 
rinda Child and Benjamin Lord. b. in Trenton. N. .J., Feb. 4. 
1811, m. Amelia Morton, dan. of -John and Amelia Morton, of 
New York City, November, 1843. He died suddenly in Ber- 
gen Hill. N. J., where he resided. Nov. 23, 1801, aged 50 
years. Eight children were given them, of whom six survive 
the father, and with their mother reside in the vicinity of New 

York City. 

[Eighth Generation ] Children: 

2725. i. William Allen Lord. b. July 24. 1842. d. Aug. 12, 1842. 
272(5. ii. William Allen Lord, 2d., b. July 24. 1843. 

2727. iii. Amelia Morton Lord. b. Sept. 11. 1845. 

2728. iv. John Lord, b. July 24. 1849. 

2729. v. Kate Lord. b. July 17. 1852. 

2730. vi. James DeMott Lord, b. Nov. 4. 1854. 

2731. vii. Adaline Lord, b. Aug. 30, 1856. 

2732. viii. Frederic Lord, b. Aug. 31, 1859. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2709. iii. Richard D. Lokd, third son and child of Laurin- 
da Child and Benjamin Lord, b. in Trenton. N. J., Jan. 24, 
1813, m. Jan. 24, 1838, Jane Capner, dau. of Thomas and Jane 
Capner. Mr. R. D. Lord died in Trenton. December 21. 1853. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2733. i. Lacrinda Lord. b. Feb. 25, 1840. d. Oct. 1, 1865. 

2734. ii. Anna Margaret Lord, b. Mch. 17. 1841. 

2735. iii. Sarah Jane Lord. b. Jan. 15. 1845. 

2736. iv. Thomas Capner Lokd, b. Sept. 2. 1847. d. Sept. 13, 1849. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2710. iv. Ebenezeb Bradley Lord, fourth son and child 
of Laurinda Child and Benjamin Lord, b. in Trenton, N. .)., 
May 2. 1816, m. twice— 1st m., July 15, 1844, to Mary Ann, 
Hays, dau. of Michael and Elizabeth Hays, of Burlington, N. .1. 
Mrs. Mary A. H. Lord d. at the home of her parents June 9 
1850. Mr. Lord m. 2d, Elmira Hays, sister of his first wife, 
June 20, 1855. Mr. Ebenezer B. Lord d. at the residence of 
his father-indaw Aug. 7. 1856. His widow, Mrs. Elmira II. Lord, 
m. 2d. Judge Elias Doughty, of Vineland. N. J.. Oct. 29, 1873. 



354 BENJAMIN CHILI) OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[ Eighth Generation . J Children : 

2737. i. Mary Clara Lord. m. Oct. 7. 1871, Nathan Irving, of Trenton, 
N. J. 

273S. ii. Elizabeth Hays Lord, d. in infancy. 
[Seventh Generation.] 

271 L. v. Benjamin Lord, Jr., fifth son and child of Lau- 
rinda Child and Benjamin Lord, b. in the city of Trenton, 
N. J., Aug. 21, 1819, was twice married — 1st m., May 23, 
1843, Amanda Potter, dau. of Isaac and Abigail Potter of New 
Providence, N. J. Mrs. Amanda Potter Lord d. in New York 
City May 31, 1870. Dr. Lord m. 2d, Julia Fowler, dau. of 
Charles and Lillias Fowler, of New York City, Dec. 6, 1871. 
Dr. Benjamin Lord is of the dental profession, residing on West 
Twenty-eighth Street, New York. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2739. i. Benjamin Potter Lord, b. Mch. 10, 1845, d. Mch. 13. 1845. 

2740. ii. Georgiana Lord, b. Oct. 2, 1846. 

2741. iii. Joseph Edwin Lord, 1>. Feb. 6, 1848. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2713. vii. Timothy W. Lord, sixth son and seventh child 
of Laurinda Child and Benjamin Lord, b. in Trenton, N. J., 
Jan. 22, 1824, m. 1st. June 3, 1846, Martha Hornell, dau. of 
Richard A. and Martha Hornell. Mrs. M. H. Lord, d. June 9, 
1877. Mr. T. W. Lord m. 2d, June 19, 1878, Miss Ellen 
Fowler, sister of the second Mrs. Benjamin Lord. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2742. i. Anna Amelia Lord, b. Feb. 11, 1848, d. April 18, 1850. 

2743. ii. Benjamin Child Lord, b. Oct. 15, 1849, d. Nov. 14, 1857. 

2744. iii. Richard Hornell Lord, b. Nov. 28, 1851. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2714. viii. Hezekiah F. Lord, seventh son and eighth child 
of Laurinda Child and Benjamin Lord, b. in the city of Tren- 
ton, N. J., Sept. 11, 1826, m. June 4, 1844, Emma M. Seinor, 
dau. of William and Catherine Seinor, of New York City. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2745. i. Mary J. Lord, b. Mch. 4, 1845. 

2746. ii. Emma S. Lord, b. Nov. 16. 1846. 

2747. iii. Benjamin F. Lord, b. Feb. 12, 1848. 

2748. iv. Kate S. Lord, b. Dec. 8, 1852. 

2749. v. William G. Lord, b. Aug. 2, 1854, d. Aug. 9, 1856. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2715. ix. Mary Laurinda Lord, second dau. and ninth 
child of Laurinda Child and Benjamin Lord, b. in Trenton, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 355 

N. J., Oct. 4, 1828, in. Nov. 18, 1851, Arthur Hornell of Tren- 
ton. Mrs. Mary L. L. Hornell d. March 24, 1853. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

2750. i. Anna M. IIoknell, resides in Camden, X. J. 

[Sixth Generation. ] 

2700. iii. Richard Dwight Child, third child and second 

sou of Timothy and Amy Parish Child, b. in Thompson, Ct, 
Sept. 4, 1702, was twice married— 1st, Feb. 20, 1817, Mary 
Andrews, who was b. April 12, 1796, dau. of Francis and Sabra 

Parsons Andrews, and d. Mch. 19, 1855. Mr. Richard D. Child 
m, 2d. Dec. 13, 1857, Abigail Andrews, who was b. in 1799, and 
d. Jan. 10, 1877. Mr. Child was a man of business, and so 
efficient in whatever he undertook, that one placed by the 
will of his fellow citizens in place of power or trust, they were 
reluctant to accept a change. We find him holding the office 
of supervisor of Neversink, for three years, from 1825 to 1828. 
In 1828 he was elected sheriff of Sullivan Co., New York. He 
made his home in Graliamsville, New York, residing in one 
home some forty-seven }"ears. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2751. i. Maria Child, b. Aug. 3, 1818, in. Dec. 18-10, John H. Divine. 

2752. ii. Clarissa Andrews Child, b. Nov. 14, 1821, ra. June 2!). 1849. 
Nathan C. Clark. 

2753. iii. Betsey Smith Child, b. June 26, 1826, d. Nov. 23, 1851. 
•2754. iv. Harriet Andrews Child, b. Dec. 11, 1828, d. July 23, 1834. 

2755. v. George Bradley Child, b. Feb. 9, 1838, m. 1st, Juue 12, 1860, 
Adelia Decker, who d. Mch. 30. 1869: in. 2d, Mch. 14. 1872. Nancy P. Smith. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2751. i. Maria Child, eldest child of Richard Dwight and 
Mary Andrews Child, b. in Graliamsville, Sullivan Co., N. Y., 
Aug. 3, 1818, m. Dec. 1840, John H. Divine, d. Nov. 14. 1850. 
Residence at Lochsheldrake, Sullivan Co., N. Y. 

I Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2756. i. Dwight Divine, b. Mch. 1842. Resides in Elleuville, N. V. 

2757. ii. James Divine, b. June 1, 1849, d. Aug. 10, 1870. 

S \ t-nth Generation.] 

2752. ii. Clarissa Andrews Child, second dau. and child 

of Richard and Mary Andrews Child, b in Grahams ville, N.Y.. 

Nov. 14, 1821, m. June 29, 1840, Nathan C. Clark. Residence 

Grahamsville, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2758. i. Mary Horton Clark, b. Aug. is. 1855. Resides in Grahams- 
ville. 



356 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2759. ii. Richard Dwight Ci-ark, b. July 11, 1857. Resides in Hurley, 
Ulster Co., N. Y. 

2760. iii. Marius Eugene Clark, b. Aug. 12, 186:;!. Resides in Grahams- 
ville. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2755. v. George Bradley Child, only son and youngest 
child of Kichard Dwight and Mary Andrews Child, b. in 
Grahamsville. Sullivan Co., N. Y., Feb. 9, 1838, has twice 
married— 1st, June 12. 1860. Adelia Decker, she d. Mch. 30, 
1869; m. 2d. Mch. 14, 1872, Nancy P. Smith. Mr. Child is 
following closely in the footsteps of his most worthy father; is 
a resident of Grahamsville. and has there been, like his father, 
supervisor of Neversink, from 1867 to 1873, some five vears. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2761. i. Anna Child, b. July 21, 1861, d. July 27. 1864. 

2762. ii. Amy Child, b. July 15. 1873. 

2763. iii. Richard Timothy Child, b. Get, 22, 1878. 

| Sixth Generation.] 

2701. iv. Obadiah Child, third son and fourth child of 
Timothy and Amy Parish Child, b. in Thompson, Ct., Dec. 
25. 1794 : removed from Connecticut with his father in 1799, 
to Sullivan Co, N. Y. In 1815, on May 9, he m. in Never- 
sink. Charity Thompson, who was b. in Marbletown, Ulster 
Co., N. Y.. Dec 14, 1795, a dan. of John and Ann Thompson, 
of Neversink, Ulster Co.. and afterwards of Homer, Cayuga 
Co.. N. Y. A daughter of Mr. Obadiah Child (Mrs. Vranden- 
burg) sends us a most pleasant sketch of him : 

"My father was a member of the Baptist church, an active and useful 
christian, always willing to make any sacrifice to attend with his family 
upon the services of the Sanctuary. A close student of the Bible, and re- 
markable or peculiar for his apt quotations of scripture in conversation. 
Gifted with a sweet power of melody, he delighted in the service of song, 
and was often the leader in this part of the services. A very favorite hymn 
was one commencing 'Welcome, sweet day of rest.' A fond husband, and 
indulgent father, he was ever ready to expend his means in the purchase of 
books and other methods for the education of his children; but exceedingly 
particular in the observance of the Sabbath. His last illness (typhoid fever) 
was brief but severe. On his last earthly Sabbath, a beautiful clear morn- 
ing, he said: 'This is Sunday, and I am very happy." 'The time for the 
singing of birds has come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in the land.' 
He died April 8th, 1867, at Wawarsing, Ulster Co., New York, and his 
memory is precious to us. Mrs. Charity Thompson Child, my mother, 
survived my father about nine years. She always enjoyed that 'peace 
which passeth understanding, from her constant trust in Jesus. She loved 
the New Testament with a devotion seldom witnessed; her life was an ex- 



AND Ills DESCENDANTS. 357 

amplification of the sweel spirit of Christ. I often thought her name suit- 
table, for her life was love. She was very happy through her last shorl 
sickness. I asked her near the close, 'Are you happy trusting in Jesus?' 
her answer, 'Oyes; happier than I ever expected to he," with such a lighl 
beaming on her countenance as 1 never saw elsewhere. She tried to saj 
more, we could only understand 'pure in heart,' and then she entered into 
•perfect peace,' March 9th, 1875. from Neversink, Sullivan Co. X. Y." 
[Seventh Generation. J Children: 

2704. i. Charles C. Child, b. Dec. '-26. 1819. m. twice. 

27(j."i. ii. Mary Ann Child, b. July 8, 1822, m. Feb. 16, 1*47. John Vraden- 
burg. 

2766. lii. Lorinda Child, b. Nov. 19, 1825, m. Sept. 21. 1852, Herman 
Sarr. 

2707. iv. Amy Child, b. Sept. 20, 1S28, m. 1858, Win. C Carson. 

2768. v. John Thompson Child, b. Mch. 17, 1881, d. Any. 30, 1849. 

2769. vi. Sarah Child, b. Feb. 22, 1834, in Rhinebeck, Duchess Co., N.Y. 

2770. vii. Abigail Child, b. Oct. 11, 1837, m. Oct. 23, 1878. II. Atherton. 

2771. viii. Bradley Child, b. Dec. 8, 1840, d. Feb. 11. 1841. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2765. ii. Mary Axn Child, eldest dau. and second child 
of Obadiah and Charity Thompson Child, b. in Liberty, Sulli- 
van Co., July 8, 1822. m. Feb. 16, 1847, Rev. John Vradenburg, 
at Grahamsville, Sullivan Co , X. Y. Their residence has been 
in New Paltz. now Clintondale, Ulster Co., 1ST. Y. "Mr. John 
Vradenburg is a clergyman, most active and successful in his 
manifold labors, especially in revival seasons, often his duties 
calling him to distant fields of labor.'" Mrs. Mary A. Child 
Vradenburg is an intelligent, earnest, christian wife and mother. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2772. i. Louisa Vradenburg, b. Dec. 9. 1847, m. June 27, 1866, Eli Van- 
Wagner. 

2773. ii. Charles Vradenburg, b. Nov. 29, 1848. d. May 21, 1853. 

2774. iii. James Vradenburg, b. Jan. 26, 1853, d. May 21, 1853. 
•277"). iv. Minnie Vradenburg, b. Mch. 3, 1854, m. Aug. 28. 1879. 

2776. v. Carrie Vradenburg, b. Jan. 12, 1860. 

2777. vi. Jennie Vradenburg, b. April 21. 1865. 
[Eighth Generation.] 

2772. i. Louisa Vradenburg, eldest child of Mary Ann 
Child and Kev. John Vradenburg, b. in New Paltz, Ulster Co., 
N. Y.. m. June 27. 1866, Eli Van Wagner. In 1S69 they re- 
moved to Corning, Adams Co., Iowa, where Mr. Van Wagner 
is engaged in mercantile business. The}* are active, prominent 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Van Wagner 
is the Corresponding Secretary of the Women's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society. 



358 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2778. i. Lillie Van Wagner, b. May 21, 18G7, in New Paltz, N. Y. 

2779. ii. Mary Van Wagner, b. July 7. 1868, in New Paltz, N. V. 

2780. iii. Lizzie Van Wagner, b. July 21, 1875, in Corning, Iowa. 

2781. iv. Maude Van Wagner, b. May 6, 1877, in Corning, Iowa. 

2782. v. Infant — unnamed — b. Sept. 11, 1879, in Corning, Iowa. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2766. iii. Lorinda Child, second dan. and third child of 
Obadiah and Charity Thompson Child, b. in Rockland, Sulli- 
van Co., N. Y., Nov. 19, 1825, in. Sept. 21, 1852. Herman 
Sarr, of Grahamsville, Sullivan Co.., N. Y. They reside at 
Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie Co., Iowa. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2783. i. Mary Alice Sarr, b. July 19, 1853, d. Sept. 21, 1854,, at Palls- 
burgh, N. Y. 

2784. ii. Viola Sarr, b. Aug. 6, 1855, m. 1875, J. B. Matthews. 

2785. iii. Ellen Sarr, b. Oct. 22, 1859. in Franklin, Polk Co., Iowa. 

2786. iv. John Sarr, b. Mch. 23, 1866, d. Dec. 7, 1866. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2784. ii. Yiola Sarr, second dan. and child of Lorinda 
Child and Herman Sarr, b. in Fallsburgh, Sullivan Co., N. Y , 
Aug. 6, 1855, m. in 1875, J. B. Mathews. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2787. i. Herman P. Mathews, b. April 15, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2767. iv. Amy Child, third dau. and fourth child of Oba- 
diah and Charity Thompson Child, b. in Rockland, Sullivan 
Co., K Y, Sept. 20, 1828, in. April 12, 1860. William C. 
Carson. Before her marriage, Mrs. Carson was a teacher in 
Dubuque, Iowa, now resides at Council Bluff, Iowa. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2788. i. Ida Carson, b. April 8, 1861. 

2789. ii. Etta Carson, b. Sept. 11, 1863, d. May 11, 1865. 

2790. iii. Edith Carson, b. Feb. 17, 1865. 

2791. iv. Willie Carson, b. May 30, 1868, d. Jan. 13, 1870. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2703. vi. Archippus Parish Child, fourth son and sixth 
child of Timothy and Amy Parish Child, b. in Sullivan Co., 
N. Y, Dec. 31, 1797, m. in Stoddardsville, Pa.. Dec. 27, 1818, 
Margaret Sax, who was b. Oct. 16, 1803. 

Mr. A. P. Child upon his marriage settled in Wilkes Barre, 
Luzerne Co., Pa.: two years latter he removed to Stoddards- 
ville, and engaged in carpentry, making the building of mills, 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 359 

his especial work. He built a number of steam mills in Luzerne 
county, Pa., both grist and saw mills, and was considered a 
leading mill-wright of the State. In L839, Mr. Child moved 
to Hickory Hun. and while residenl here rose to a fine position 
in his business. In LS5 1 he again moved, and now settled in 
Montoursville, Lycoming Co., Pa., where he continued his busi- 
ness until his death, Feb. 19, 1860, aged 62. Mrs. Margaret 
Sax Child survives her husband, and is residing with her son, 
J. Sinton Child, in Montoursville, Pa. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3792. i. Bradley Childs. b. Dee. 5, 1819, in. Jan. 4. 1849. Margarey S. 
Willson. 

2793. ii. Julian Childs. b. Oct. 25. 1821, m. April 17. 18*1, John C. 
Strong. 

2794. iii. Maria I.. Ciui.ii>. b. Aug. 15, 1824. m. .lime 26, 1843, George 
Lowman. 

2795. iv. Harriet Childs, b. May 5, 1827, in. July 5. 1846, William Steel. 

2796. v. Isabklla Childs, b. Nov. 27. 1829, in Stoddardsville. Pa., d. 
Dec. 3, 1849, ae. 20, in Hickory Run, Pa. 

2797. vi. Margaret Childs, b. April 12. 1832, in. Jan. 1, 1851, Gerard 
I.. Staples 

2798. vii. Joseph Sinton Childs, b. Sept. 24, 1835, in Jan. 13. 1865, 
Mary Mecum. 

2799. viii. James Bingham Childs. b. June 1. 1838, in Stoddardsville, 
Pa., d. May 13. 1844. in Hickory Run. Pa. 

2800. ix. Mary Childs, b. April 16, 1841. in Hickory Run. d. Aug. 24. 
1869. in Montoursville. Pa 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2792. i. Bradley Childs, eldest son and child of Archip- 
pus and Margaret Sax Child, b. in Wilkesbarre. Pa.. Dec. 5. 
1819, m. Jan. -4, 1849, Margarey S. Willson. Is an extensive 
and successful business man, resides in White Haven, Luzerne 
Co., Pa. Lumber manufacturer. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2801. i. Elizabeth Watson Childs, b. Dec. 18, 1850, d. May 22, 1852. 

2802. ii. Xokah S. Childs, b. Aug. 29. 1852, in. May 28, 1872, George 
W. Koons. 

2803. iii. Archie Parish Childs. b. Sept. 5. 1854, in. Aug. 2, 1873, Ella 
Bechtell. 

2804. iv. Alexander M. Childs. b. Aug. 31, 1856, d. June 6, 1862. 

2805. v. Bradley W. Childs, b. Sept. 2, 1858. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2802. ii. Noraii S. Childs, second dau. and child of Brad- 
lev and Margarey S. Willson Childs, b. in White Haven, Pa., 
Aug. 29, 1852. m. May 28, 1872. George W. Koons. 



360 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



| Ninth Generation.] Children: 
2800. i. Alexander W. Koons, b. June 12, 1873. 

2807. ii. Bradley Koons,, b. Mch. 12, 1875. 

2808. iii. George Willson Koons, b. Mch. 21, 1877. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2803. iii. Archie Parish Childs, eldest son and third child 
of Bradley and Margarey S. Willson Childs, b. in White Haven, 
Pa., Sept. 5, 1854-, m. Aug. 2, 1873, Ella Bechtell. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2809. i. Guy B. Childs, b. June 21, 1874, d. Jan. 25, 1878. 

2810. ii. Margarey Childs, b. Nov. 25, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2793. ii. Julian Childs, eldest dan. and second child of 
Archippus P. and Margaret Sax Childs, b. in Stoddardsville, 
Pa,, Oct. 25, 1821, m. April 17, 1841. John C. Strong. Resides 
in White Haven, Luzerne Co., Pa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2811. i. James Strong, b. Feb. 16, 1842, in. Sept. 26, 1865. Amanda 
Rupert. 

2812. ii. Mary Margaret Strong, b. Jan. 25, 1846. in. Dec. 20. 1866, 
Samuel Watson. 

2813. iii. George Bradley Strong, b. Oct, 4, 1849. m. Aug. 29, 1874, 
Susie Wanian. 

2814. iv. Sarah Isabella Strong, b. Dec. 6, 1854. in. Sept. 16, 1873, 
L. E. Tennant. 

2815. v. Archie Parish Strong, b. Nov. 3, 1856. 

2816. vi. John Curtis Strong, b. April 5. 1859. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2811. i. James Strong, eldest child of Julian Childs and 
John C. Strong, b. Feb. 16, 1842. m. Sept. 26, 1865. Amanda 
Rupert. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2817. i Curtis Rupert Strong, b. June 16, 1867, d. Sept. 3, 1867. 

2818. ii. Archie Merwine Strong, b. Dee. 24, 1869, d. June 5, 1874. 

2819. iii. George Strong, b. Feb. 2, 1871, d. April 15, 1875. 

2820. iv. Edward Strong, b. June 5, 1873. 

2821. v. Charlie Strong, b Dec. 15, 1875. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2812. ii. Mary Margaret Strong, eldest dau. and second 
child of Julian Childs and John C. Strong, b. Jan. 25. 1846, 
in. Dec. 20, 1866, Samuel Watson. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2822. i. Clarabel Watson, b. Aug. 12. 1868. 

2823. ii. Sadie Julia Watson, b. July 24, 1873. 

2824. iii. John Curtis Watson, b. April 29, 1875. 

2825. iv. Archie Buttlar Watson, b. Dec. 18, 1878. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 361 

[ Eighth Generation.] 

2S13. iii. George Bradley Strong, second son and third 
child of Julian Childs and John C. Strong, b. Oct. 4, 1849, m. 
Aug. 29, 1874, Susie Wamao. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2826. i. Sarah Jennie Strong b. Nov. 15, 1875. 

2827. ii. Jvi.iaxna Strong, b. Nov. 29, 1876. 

2828. iii. James Parish Strong, b. Dec. 8, 1878. 

Eighth Generation.] 

2814. iv. Sarah Isabell Strong, second dan. and fourth 
child of Julian Childs and John C. Strong, b. Dec. 6. 1854, m. 
Sept. 16, 1-73, L. E. Tenant. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2830. i. John Curtis Tenant, b. Nov. 18, 1874. 

5831. ii. Bradley Child Tenant, b. June 24. 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2794. iii. Maria L. Childs, second dau. and third child of 
Archippus and Margaret Sax Childs, b. Aug. 15, 1824. in 
Stoddardsville, Pa., m. June 6, 1843, George Lowman. Re- 
sides in Troy, Bradford Co., Pa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2832. i. Mary Elizabeth Lowman. b. Nov. 10. 1*44. d. Feb. 2, 1847. 

2833. ii. Kate Lowman. b. June 5. 1846, m. Oct. 1, 1867. Herriek Mc- 
Ream. 

2834. iii. Archie Parish Lowman, b. Sept. 20, 1848, d. Feb. 5, 1849. 

2835. iv. Charles Wesley Lowman. 1>. Mch. 29. 1851, m. Mch. 24, 
1-77. Kate MeCormiek. 

2836. v. James B. Lowman, b. April 12, 1853, m. Nov. 15, 1877, Maranda 
Morgan. 

;7. vi. Helen A. Lowman. b. Nov. 4. 1S55, m. April 12, 1874, H. Bald- 
win. 

[Eighth Generation^ 

2833. ii. Kate Lowman, second dau. and child of Maria 
L. Childs and George Lowman. b. June 5, 1846. m. Oct. 1. 
1867. Herriek McReam. 
[Ninth Generation ] Children: 

2838. i. Essie M. McReam, b. Feb. 10, 1871. 

2839. ii. Nellie M. McReam. b. July 15, 1872, d. Oct. 3, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2836. v. James B. Lowman, third son and fifth child of 
Maria L. Childs and George Lowman, b. April 12, 1853, in. 
Nov. 15, 1877, Maranda Morgan. 

[Xinth Generation.] Child : 

2840. i. Alice M. Lowman. b. Sept. 16, 1879. 
B-i 



362 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS 



[Eighth Generation.] 

2837. vi. Helen Adaline Lowman, third dau. and sixth 
child of Maria L. Childs and George Lowman, b. Nov. 4, 1855, 
m. April 12, 1874, H. Baldwin. 
[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2841. i. William F. Baldwin, b. Sept. 29, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation] 

2795. iv. Harriet Childs, third dau. and fourth child of 
Archippus and Margaret Sax Childs, b. in Stoddardsville, Pa., 
May 5, 1827, m. July 5, 1816, William Steel. Eeside in 
Nicholson, Wyoming Co., Pa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2842. i. Edgar Alonzo Steele, b. Mch. 6, 1848, in. Dec. 7, 1875, Alice 
Brown. 

2843. ii. Mary Alice Steele, b. Nov. 13, 1851, m. June 17, 1872, Wil- 
iam Bartholomew. 

2844. iii. Emma Francis Steele, b. July 31, 1854, in. June 28, 1873, 
Frank McDonald. 

2845. iv. Sinton Elroy Steele, b. Mch. 27, 1858. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2812. i. Edgar Alonzo Steele, eldest child of Harriet 

Childs and William Steele, b. Mch. 6, 1818, m. Dec. 7, 1875, 

Alice Brown. 

[Ninth Generation.] Child: 

2846. i. Charles Edgar Steele, b. April 2, 1878. 

{Eighth Generation.] 

2813. ii. Mary Alice Steele, eldest dau. and second child 
of Harriet Childs and William Steele, b. Nov. 13, 1851, m. 
June 17, 1872, William Bartholomew. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

2847. i. Beulah Benton Bartholomew, b. June 20, 1877. 

2848. ii. William Havie Bartholomew, b. May 2, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2841. iii. Emma Francis Steele, second dau. and third 
child of Harriet Childs and William Steele, b. July 31, 1854, 
m. June 28, 1873, Frank McDonald. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children : 

2849. i. Harriet May McDonald, b. May 9, 1874. 

2850. ii. Eva Francis McDonald, b. Oct. 20, 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2797. vi. Margaret Childs, fifth dau. and sixth child of 
Archippus and Margaret Sax Childs, b. April 12, 1832, in 
Stoddardsville, Pa., m. Jan. 1, 1851, Gerard L. Staples, Reside 
at Jersey Shore, Lycoming Co., Pa. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 363 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2851. i. Gertrude R. Staples, b. May 30, 185:!. in. June 10, 1875, 
Joseph Stevenson. 

2852. ii. Byron E. Stai-i.es, b. April 14, 1855. 

2853. iii. Edward Eugene Staples, b. Nov. 19, 1857. 

2854. iv. JennieS. Staples, b. June 20, 1862. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

2851. i. Gertrude R. Staples, eldest child of Margaret 
Childs and Gerard L. Staples, b. May 30, 1853, m. June 19, 
1875, Joseph Stevenson. 
[Ninth Generation] Children: 

2855. i. Maud Estella Stevenson, b. Sept. 7, 1877. 

2856. ii. Frank N. Stevenson, b. Aug. 10, 1879. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2798. vii. Joseph Sinton Childs, second son and seventh 
child of Archippus and Margaret Sax Childs, b. Sept. 24, 1835, 
in Stoddardsville, Pa., m. Jan. 13, 1865. Mary Mecum. Resides 
at Jersey Shore, Lycoming Co., Pa 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2857. i. Harry Sinton Childs, b. April 9, 1867. 

2858. ii. George Bradley Childs, b. Sept. 5, 1869. 

2859. iii. Robert Otto Childs, b. June 11, 1872, d. Sept. 15, 1877. 

2860. iv. Irvie G. P. Childs, b. May 3, 1875, d. May 10. 1875. 

2861. v. William Hesser Childs, b. April 9, 1877. 

2862. vi. Ida Mary Childs, b. Aug. 25, 1879. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2704. vii. Abigail Child, third dau. and seventh child of 
Timothy and Amy Parish Child, was born in Thompson, Sulli- 
van Co., N. Y., on the 3d January, 1800, married 25th March, 
1821, Nathan Anderson, son of George and Matilda Anderson. 
Mr. Anderson died 26th March, 182b\ Mrs. Anderson resides 
in Philadelphia, Pa., where she "celebrated her eightieth birth - 
day anniversary," as she writes her nephew, Dr. William G. 
Lord, of Newark, N. J., on the 21st January, 1880, having 
walked alone in her widowhood for fifty-four years. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2705. viii. James Bpjgham Child, fifth son and eisrhth 
child of Timothy and Amy Parish Child, born in Thompson, 
Sullivan Co., N. Y., on December 24, 1802, married twice — 1st, 
to Ann Willsie; m. 2d, in 1861, to Mrs. Weston, widow of 
Rev. Horace Weston. Mr. James B. Child began his business 
career in Orange Co., N. Y. In 1848 moved to Ellen ville 
Ulster Co., N. Y., and died there on February 14, 1878. 



361 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2863. i. George Roosa Child, b. Meh. 26, 1827. 

2864. ii. NiAL Townley Child, b. April 13, 1830, m. twice— 1st, Jan. 26. 
1853, Alvira Weston, who d. April 11, 1863; in. 2d, Jan. 3, 1864, Manila 
Weston. 

2865. iii. James Brigham Child. Jr., b. Nov. 2, 1838, in. Oct. 2, 1860. 
Margaret H. Brown, dau. of Rev. Paul R. Brown. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

2864. ii. Nial Towx ley Child, second son and child of 
James Brigham and Ann Wilisie Child, b. in Minisink, Orange 
Co., N. Y., April 13, 1S30 ; m. twice— 1st, Jan. 26, 1853. Alvira 
Weston ; Mrs. Alvira Weston Child d. April 11, 1863 ; m. 2d, 
Jan. 3, 1861, Manila Weston. Mr. Child is a tanner, and re- 
sides in Nicholson, Pa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2866. i. George Wesley Child, b. April 15, 1854. 

2867. ii. Anna Elizabeth Child, b. Men. 8, 1856. 

2868. iii. Ellen Augusta Child, b. April 3. I860. 

2869. iv. Horace Weston Child, b May 12. 1861. 

2870. v. James Howard Child, b. Aug. 15, 1869. 

2871. vi William McKinStky Child, b. Sept. 1. 1871. d. Feb. 6, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2S65. iii. James Brigham Child. Jr.. third son and child 
of James B. and Ann Wilisie Child, b. in Orange Co., N. Y., 
Nov. 2. 1838. m. Oct. 2. 1860, Margaret H. Brown, dau. of Rev. 
Paul R Brown, of the New York conference, of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Mrs. Margaret H. Brown Child b. Dec. 29. 

1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2872. i. Katie L. Child, b. Meh. 9, 1865. 

2873. ii. Mary E. Child, b. Sept. 5. 1875. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2706. ix. Judge John Greexleaf Child, sixth son and 
youngest child of Timothy and Amy Parish Child, b. in 
Thompson. Sullivan Co., N. Y., Oct. 10, 1805. Has been m. 
twice— 1st. in 1829, to Lois Ann Grant: 2d m., May 16, 1875, 
Mrs. Hoyt. widow of Charles Hoyt, Judge Child is a man of 
position in the town of Xapanock, Ulster Co., X. Y., a man 
who may be accredited most emphatically self-made. His 
school training continued but twenty-seven days after he was 
twelve vears old, yet from his sixteenth year to his twenty- 
second he taught in the winters, working upon his fathers 



AND HIS DKSl'KXDANTS. .'ICf) 

farm in the summer. The succeeding four years he served as 
clerk and manager at the Ulster Iron Works. In 1835 he 
moved to Sullivan Co., and was appointed under sheriff and 
served three years, and elected sheriff. In 1863 he was elected 
special county judge, and special surrogate, and served six 
years. In 1870, Judge Child settled in Napanock, and in 1878 
served as justice of the sessions. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1858 at Albany, having prepj red himself for his examina 
tion and practice of the law without a tutor, qualifying himself 
in like manner as a successful surveyor, hi his seventy-fifth 
year he is yet in the active exercise of his profession, and 
serving as justice of the peace. 
[Seventh Generation J Children : 

2874. i. John T. Child, b. May 10, 1831, m. Louisa Holmes. 

2875. ii. Amos G. Child, b. Nov. 2, 1833, in. Margaret 

2876. iii. Billings G. Child, b. Dee. 27, 1835, rn. Celia Vandermark. 

2877. iv. Emily Child, b. March 4, 1838. 

2878. v. Mart Child, b. Nov. 1839. 

2879. vi. Arthur P. Child, b. Oct. 1, 1843. 

2880. vii. Archibald N. Child, b. March 11, 1846. 

2881. viii. James E. Child, b July 11, 1848. 

[We have made innumerable efforts in differing ways to obtain the proper 
dates in the five families following, but in vain. | 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2874. i. John Traverse Child, eldest son and child of 
Judge John G. and Lois A. Grant Child, b. in Sullivan Co. on 
May 16, 1831, and in. — — —Louisa Holmes of Pittsburg, Pa. 
Mr. John T. Child was a civil engineer and served in the late 
war with great efficiency in this capacity. He d. in Pittsburg, 
Pa., in 1869. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2882. i. Willie Child. 

2883. ii. Carrie Child. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2875. ii. Amos Grant Child, second son and child of 
Judge John G. and Lois A. Grant Child, b. in Sullivan Co. on 
Nov. 2, 1833, and m. Margaret - -. Mr. Amos G. Child was 
like his elder brother, a civil engineer, and like him did good 

service in the war of the rebellion. Mrs. Margaret 

Child died. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2884. i. Clinton S. Child. 

2885. ii. A daughter. 



36(3 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation J 

2876. iii. Billings G. Child, third son and child of Judge 
John Gr. and Lois A. Grant Child, b. in Sullivan Co., Dec, 27, 
1835, m. Celia Vandermark. Of this third son of Judge Child 
we can make the same record as of the two brothers elder. 
Mr. B. G. Child d. in Elmira, N. Y., in 1870. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

2886. i. Anna T. Child. 

2887. ii. Lillie Child. 
2888 iii. Carrie Child. 

[Seventh Generation J 

2870. vi. Arthur Parish Child, fourth son and sixth 
child of Judge John G. and Lois A. Grant Child, b. in Sulli- 
van Co., N. Y., Oct. 1, 1843, m. and has three children. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2889. i. Anna Child. 

2890. ii. Lois Child. 

2891. iii. Antoinette Child. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2880. vii. Archibald N. Child, fifth son and seventh 
child of Judge John G. and Lois Grant Child, b. in Sullivan 
Co., N. Y., March 11, 184(5, m. and has two children. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2892 i. George Child. 

2893. ii. Infant unnamed. 

[Eifth Generation.] 

2691. iv. Capt. John Child, second son and fourth child of 
Richard and Abigail Green Child, b. in Thompson, Conn., 
March 11, 1766, m. Nov. 15, 1792, Martha Hutchins, who was 
b. in Haverhill, Essex Co., Mass., Jan. 9, 1773. Mrs. Martha 
Hutchins Child was a daughter of Jeremiah Hutchins, who 
had removed from Massachusetts to Bath, N. H., when Mrs. 
Child was very young. Mr. Child was early apprenticed to 
Mr. John May of Woodstock, Conn., a kinsman; this transac- 
tion was, therefore, not effected in a strictly legal manner. 
Upon attaining his majority the remuneration for his services 
was referred to two friends of Mr. May and Mr. Child, who 
settled the affair amicably or satisfactorily to each — in the 
quaint phraseology of the time " chalked a like amount " — 
which enabled Mr. Child to provide himself with an outfit, 
consisting of a French horse, a saddle and bridle, a suit of 
clothing and a gun — the cost of all perhaps would not exceed 



AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. 367 

fifty dollars. Thus equipped Mr. Child joined his brother-in- 
law, Mr. Ezra Child, in Hath, 1ST. H. Moresurely armed with 

cheerful determination and strong hope, he was so well skilled 
that he commanded readily the highest wages of the times, 
viz., $8 per month. The accumulations arising therefrom en- 
abled him to marry in the simple style of the country, with 
stock consisting of his horse, a black cow (said to have ''given 
blue milk,") a black swine, and ;i black sheep. His competent 
husbandry soon increased his store and want was known only 
when the grain crop of one year scarce sufficed to meet the in- 
coming harvest of the succeeding; this insufficiency of bread 
was met by the good black cow and plenty of potatoes. Mr. 
and Mrs. Child, indifferent to luxuries, found their happiness in 
meeting their labors with one will and heart, and trained a 
noble, handsome family of sons and daughters to be good citi- 
zens, true wives, and in time parents of a goodly posterity, 
honoring their name, and winning new honors for it in turn. 
Mr. Child d. in Bath, Grafton Co., N. H., April 18, 1841; Mrs. 
Child survived her husband some twenty-three years. For 
some years before her decease, her anniversary birthday was 
celebrated bv the home gathering; of children and grand- 
children — the last occasion observed, in 1S63, her descendants 
numbered 112. Gathered home like the full ripened grain, 
when past the four score and ten, she passed from earth in the 
full assurance of a comfortable hope, in 1804. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2894. i. Mehttable Child, b. Jan. 20, 1794, d. Sept. 14, 1794. 

2895. ii. Abigail Child, b. April 22, 1798, m. Dee. 2, 1819. Hon. John 
Hibbard. 

2890. iii. Hannah Child, b. May 25, 1800, m. Sept. 11, 1822, Leonard 
Walker. 

2897. iv. Martha Child, b. Jan. 11, 1802, m. Mch. 14, 1822, William 
bans. 

2898. v. Luvia Child, b. Feb. 23, 1804, m. Sept. 11, 1823, Henry H. 
Lang. 

2899 vi. John May Child, b. Jan. 23, 1806, m. 1828, Sally Randall. 

2900. vii. Ezra Child, b. Jan. 26, 1808, m. 1st, Get, 31, 1834, Hannah 
Walden; m. 2d, 1864, Martha Eastman. 

2901. viii. Dwight Penuel Child, b. July 9, 1810, m. May 16, 1833, 
Nancy May Child. 

2902. ix. Rosanna Child, b. April 30, 1812, m. Mirand A. Witeher. 

2903. x. Susan L. Child, b. Nov. 23, 1814, m. Jan. 1, 1835, William 
Lang. 

2904. xi. Bradley G. Child, b. Sept. 24, 1818, m. Nov. 17, 1837, Hannah 
Child. 



368 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



[Sixth Generation.] 

2895. ii. Abigail Child, second dau. and child of Capt. 
John and Martha Hntchins Child, b. in Bath, N. H., April 
22, 1798, m. Dec, 2, 1819, Hon. John Hibbard, of the same 
town, b. Sept. 14, 1782. Mr. Hibbard for years represented 
the town of Bath in the New Hampshire Legislature, and at 
home has been one of the custodians of town affairs in the 
position of selectman. He is a wealthy farmer. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2905. i. Hannah C. Hibbard, b. Mch. 8, 1821, in Bath, N. H , m. Dec. 
22, 1842, Dudley Child. 

2906. ii. Chester Hibbard, b. Feb. 25, 1823, in Bath, N. H. 

2907. iii. Adeline Hibbard, b. Nov. 1. 1824, in Bath, N. H. 

2908. iv. John Hibbard, Jr., b. Mch. 25, 1826, in Bath, N. H., d. Aug. 
13, 1826. 

2909. v. Rebecca Hibbard, b. May 24, 1827, in Bath, N. H. 

2910. vi. Elihu Hibbard, b. Jan. 7, 1829, d. Dec. 18, 1874, in Bath, X. II. 

2911. vii. Infant— unchristened— b. Sept. 5, 1830, d Sept. 8, 1830, in Bath, 
N. H. 

2912 viii. Rosanna C. Hibbard, b. Feb. 5, 1832, d. April 18, 1864, in 
Bath, N. H. 

2913. ix. John Newell Hibbard, b. Nov. 19, 1833, d. Aug. 30, 1878, in 
Bath, N. H. 

2914. x. Martha J. Hibbard, b. Jan. 1, 1836. 

2915. xi. Warren Hibbard, b. June 19, 1837. 

2916. xii. Arthur Hibbard, b. Oct. 18, 1839. 

2917. xiii. Seraphina Hibbard, b. June 24, 1842. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2896. iii. Hannah Child, third dau. and child of Capt. 
John and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, N. II., May 25, 
1800, m. Sept. 11, 1822, Leonard Walker, son of Chloe Child 
and Leonard Walker, of Strafford, Orange Co.,Vt. Mr. Walker 
was a farmer and resided in Bath, Grafton Co., N. H, where 
he died Sept. 21 , 1840. Mrs. Hannah Child Walker died there 
Nov. 4, 1865. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2918. i. Charles Edwin Walker, b. July 22, 1823, d. Sept, 13, 1826. 

2919. ii. Martha Hutchins Walker, b. Feb. 5, 1825, m. Mch. 4, 1846, 
Jonathan Child. Mrs. Martha H. W. Child's record of family is given in 
connection with the family of her husband. 

2920. iii. Hannah Loraine Walker, b. July 5, 1827, d. Aug. 17, 1830. 

2921. iv. Freeman Walker, b. May 31, 1829, d. Aug. 16, 1830. 

2922. v. John Child Walker, b. Oct. 10, 1830, m. April 26, 1864, Jennie 
C. Weeks. 

2923. vi. Eliza C. Walker, b. Dec. 1, 1832, d. Oct. 3, 1853. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 369 

2924. vii. Charles Leon Walker, b. Jan. 2, 1835, m. Nov. 12, 1- 

Louisa M. Wilcox. 

2925. viii. Freeman Walker, 2d, b. April 13, 1837, d. Nov. 20, 1837. 

2926. ix. Chloe Child Walker, b. June 3, 1839, d. June 3, 1846. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

•2922. v. John Child Walker, third son and fifth child of 
Hannah Child and Leonard Walker, b. in Bath, Grafton Co., 
N. H., Oct, 10, 1830, m. April 26, 1S61, Jennie C. Weeks. 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Walker resided in Grrinnell, Iowa. Mrs. 
Walker died May 10, 1879. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2927. i. Leonard Walker, b. Mch. 17, 1865. 

2928. li. Charles Edwin Walker, b. April 11, 1867. 

2929. iii. Alice Lizzie Walker, b. Jan. 25, 1870. 

2930. iv. Ernest Walker, b. Dec. 25, 1871. 

2931. v. Bessie Weeks Walker, b. Mch. 17. 1S73. 

2932. vi. Martha Walker, b. June 21, 1S75, d. Sept. 23, 1875. 

2933. vii. John Child Walker, Jr., b. Dee. 19, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation] 

2921. vii. Charles Leox Walker, fourth son and seventh 
child of Hannah Child and Leonard Walker, b. in Bath, Graf- 
ton Co., N. H., Jan. 2, 1835, ra. Nov. 12, 1864, Louisa M. 
Wilcox. Three children of the family of nine of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Walker survive, two sons and one daughter. Mr. 
John Child Walker, Mrs. Jonathan Child and Mr. Charles 
Leon Walker are the survivors. Very fortunately they are 
not separated, though settled far from their native hills ; thev 
have their homes in the growing town of Grinnell, Iowa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2934. i. Cora Louisa Walker, b. Feb. 17, 1867. 

2935. ii. Kf.nt Stacy Walker, b. Dec. 17, 1869. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2897. iv, Martha Child, fourth dau. and child of Capt. 
John and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Jan. 11, 
1802, m. Mch. 14, 1822, Hon. William Lang. Mr. Lang is 
now a resident in Concord, New Hampshire, and like his 
brother-in-law, has enjoyed the honor of a seat in the State 
Legislature. For some eight years he acted as selectman of the 
town of Bath. Mrs. Martha Child Lang died in Bath, N. H., 
May 5, 1834, — she was the mother of four children. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2936. i. John Child Lang. b. Feb. 8, 1823, in Bath, N. H. 

2937. ii. Mehitable Child Lang, b. Mch. 17, 1825, in Bath, N. II. 



370 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBUKY, MASS. 



2938. iii. William Dwight Lang, b. July 27, 1827, in Bath, N. H. 

2939. iv. Alice Walker Lang, b. July 22, 1829, in Bath, N. H. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2898. v. Luvia Child, fifth dau. and child of Capt. John 
and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Feb. 23, 1804, 
m. Sept. 11, 1823, Hon. Henry H. Lang, who, like the other 
sons-in-law and sons of the family, was an influential man in 
affairs of the town ; chosen by his townsmen their representa- 
tive in the State Legislature, and for years an excellent select- 
man. 
[Seventh Generation.] Child : 

2940. i. Martha M. C. Lang, b. Jan. 9, 1825. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2b99. vi. John May Child, eldest son and sixth child of 
Capt. John and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, N. H., 
Jan. 23, 1806, m. 1828, Sally Randall, of Danville, Vt. A 
farmer, and resided at Monroe Plain, Grafton Co., N. H. Mr. 
John M. Child died Aug 11, 1879. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2941. i. Lucinda Child, b. July, 1829. 

2942. ii. Edwin W. Child, b. May, 1831, m. Eliza Sterling. 

2943. iii. Israkl R. Child, b. 1833, d. young. 

2944. iv. Susan Child, b. 1835, in. Robert Beattie. 

2945. v. G. Osmore Child, b. July, 1840, m. Eliza Ash. 

2946. vi. Sarah Child, b. Jan. 1848. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2900. vii. Ezra Child, second son and seventh child of Capt. 
John and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Jan. 26, 
1808, m. Oct, 31, 1831, Hannah Walden of Newbury, Vt. 
Mr. Child m. a second time, 1861, Martha Eastman, b. Dec, 14, 
1816, and d. in 1869; he d. Sept, 17, 1870. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2947. i. Loraine W. Child, b. March 10, 1835. 

2948. ii. Abby Ann Child, b. May 7, 1837, m. Nov. 23, 1866, George C. 
Learned. 

2949. iii. Freeman Child, b. Jan. 1, 1845, d. March 10, 1845. 

2950. iv. Lewis Stone Child, b. April 10, 1846. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

2918. ii. Abby Ann Child, second dau. and child of Ezra 

and Hannah Walden Child, b. in Bath, N. H., May 7, 1837, 

m. Nov. 23, 1866, George C. Learned. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2951. i. Abby G. Learned, b. Aug. 11, 1867. 

2952. ii. John W. Learned, b. Aug. 27, 1869. 

2953. iii. Orwell N. Learned, b. Jan. 15, 1875. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. .">7l 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2901. viii. Hon. DwiGHT Pentkl Child, third son and 
eighth child of Capt. John and Martha Hutchins Cliild, b. in 
Bath, N. IT., July 9, 181<>, m. May 16, 1833, Nancy May 
Child, b. April S, 1814, in Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., a daugh- 
ter of Elisha and Nancy (Child) Child. Ft is often said that the 
external surroundings of early years leave strong imprint upon 
the mental and moral nature. We cannot doubt this, we can 
equally believe that the physical system is affected by these 
influences ; and a gueiflon of personal beauty seems the gift of 
the mountains to those born in their shadows. Upon this 
family of Capt. John and Martha Hutchins Child the dower of 
an attractive exterior has been widely bestowed, though unac- 
companied with the vigorous health we are apt to believe 
assured to the dwellers among the hills. Hon. Dwight P. 
Child makes no departure from this inheritance and has helped 
to pass on the gift to a large family of honorable sons and 
daughters. Living upon the farm his father redeemed from 
the wilderness, Mr. Child's dwelling faces the bold heights of 
the White Mountain range, not far removed, the lights and 
shadows ever diversifying the rugged sides and sharpened 
peaks afford constant interest and alluring charm. Here child- 
hood, youth and manhood, have sped their swift years, bring- 
ing cares and troubles, but much more of joy and plenty. 
Fertile acres and full garners attest the joint inheritance of 
wise thrift and intelligent foresight. Serving his fellow- 
citizens for years as a town official, Hon. Mr. Child has also 
represented them in the halls of their State Legislature. The 
home has found its charm and true light in the mother whose 
modesty deprecates notice, but whose works praise her. 
[Seventh Generation. J Children. 

2954. i. William Graves Child, M. D .. b. Feb. 4, 1884, m. 1st, March 
18, 1858, Caroline Buck Lang, she d. May 10, 1867; in. 2d, Sept. 3, 1868, 
Luvia Lang. 

2955. ii. Elisha Child, b. May 5, 1835, d. June 9, 1835, in Bath, N. H. 

2956. iii. Henry H. L. Child, b. July 22, 1836, m. Sept. 19, 1860, 
Abigail Kimball. 

2957. iv. Parker Morse Child, b. June 10. 1838, m. Oct. 29, 1861, 
Abigail Hatch. 

2958. v. Harriet Child, b. Feb. 8, 1840, d. Aug. 17, 1846, in Bath.N. H. 

2959. vi. Sylvina Thorpe Child, b. Sept. 8, 1841, m. William H. 
Sawyer of Worcester, Mass. 

2960. vii. John D. Child, b. Dec. 29, 1842, m. March 22, 1871, Julia E. 
Dow. 



372 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2961. viii. Henrietta A. Child, b. Oct. 3. 1844, d. May, 1862, in Bath. 
N. H. 

2962. ix. Adeline H. Child, b. Dec. 27, 1847. 

2963. x. Albert Child, b. Jan, 18, 1850, d. July 23, 1853. 
2964 xi. Mary Jane Child, b. Oct. 4. 1852. 

2965. xii. Juliet Child, b. Nov. 1, 1857. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2954. i. 'Hon. William G. Child, M. D., eldest son and 
child of Hon. Dwight P. and Nancy May (Child) Child, b. in 
Bath, N. H , Feb. 4, 1834, and has twice married. His first 
marriage to Miss Caroline Buck Lang, March 18, 1858. Mrs. 
Caroline B. L. Child died May 10. 1867. Dr. Child m. second 
Miss Latvia Lang, Sept. 3, 1868 ; these ladies were sisters, and 
daughters of Sherburne and Mehitable Bicker Lansr. 

Dr. William G. Child read medicine in New York City. 
walking the hospitals there, and closed his medical course in 
the department of medicine of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, 
N. H., graduating in 1857. Dr. Child settled in Bath for his 
professional duties until the war of the Rebellion. Of his army 
life we quote the account given by Rev. Prof. B. W. Dwight 
in his Genealogy of the Dwight Family : 

"He entered the TJ. S. A. of Vols., Aug. 13, 1862, as assistant surgeon in 
the 5th Regiment, N. H. Vols., and was commissioned surgeon in the 
same regiment, Nov. 4, 1864, and served until July, 1865, the close of the 
war. He was in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburgh, 
Brandy Station, Gettysburgh, Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor, Petersburgh, 
Deep Bottom, etc. While at Point Lookout, lie was detailed to superintend 
the hospital for rebel prisoners of war, where he often had 500 men on the 
sick list. He had eight assistant surgeons under him, most of them rebels. 
He was present in the theatre when President Lincoln was shot." 

When discharged from army service, Dr. Child returned to 
his native place, and resumed his practice, with greatly enlarg- 
ed experience, and has taken a prominent position in the med- 
ical profession of the State. Dr. Child has made a special 
study of diseases arising from malarial influences, and of the 
hereditary transmission of disease. With a widely extended 
ride for j^ractice, he has found time to serve honorably his con- 
stituents in the State Legislature. A very marvellous personal 
resemblance to the distinguished divine in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, has resulted in much amusement 

to the genial M. D. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2966. i. William Clinton Child, b. March 1, 1859, in Bath, N. H. 

2967. ii. Kate Child, b. Sept. 22, 1860, in Bath, N. H. 



iVIi " 



\M> HIS DESCENDANTS. 




2908. iii. Bernard Vandekkikft Child, 1>. Nov. 28, 1862, in Balh 
N. H. 

2969. iv. Susan Wade Child, b. Dec. 4, 1865, in Bath, N. II. , lU ju, 

2970. v. John Leslie Child, b. Aug. 1, 1870, in Bath, N. II. -t t^fiA* 

2971. vi. James Dwight Child, b. May 12, 1875, in Bath, X. II. 

i Seventh Generation. ] 

2950. iii. Heney II. L. Child, third son and child of Hon. 
Dwight P. and Nancy M. C. Child, b. in Bath, N. II., July 22, 
1.836, in. Sept. 19, I860, Abigail Kimball, who wash, in Bath, 
June 11, 1835, a daughter of James Kimball of that town. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. L. Child reside in Sparta, Monroe Co., 
Wis. Mr. Child is connected with the linn of Fisk & Irish, 
dealers in agricultural implements of all kinds. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2972. i. Irving Child, b. Oct. 20, 1861, in Bath, N. H. 

297:3. ii. Dwight Child, b. Dec. 3, 1864, in Bath, N. H., d. Dec. 25, 
1873, in Sparta, Wis. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2957. iv. Parker Morse Child, fourth son and child of 
Hon. Dwight P. and Nancy M. C. Child, b. in Bath, N. H., 
June 10, 1838, m. Oct, 29, 1861, Abigail Hatch, who was b. 
April 11, 1841, in Bath, N. H., is a daughter of Abel Scott 
and Abigail Hatch of Barnet, Vt. Mr. P. M. Child is general 
agent of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., for 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2974. i. Blanch May Child, b Jan. 17, 1863. 

2975. ii. Henry Hatton Child, b. Jan. 24, 1865. 
2971). iii. Scott Parker Child, b. May 30, 1867. 

2977. iv. Alice Maude Child, b. Nov. 30, 1S70. 

2978. v. Alky Child, b. April 3, 1873, d. Sept. 16, 1873. 

2979. vi. Ralph Sutherland Child, b. March 7, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

2959. vi. Sylvixa Thorp Child, second dan. and sixth 
child of Hon. Dwight P. and Nancy M. (Child) Child, b. in Bath, 
N. H., Sept. 8, 1841, in. Jan. 4, 1870, William A. Sawyer of 
Worcester, Mass. Mrs. Sylvina T. Child Sawyer d. Sept. 23, 
l s 72. Mr. Sawyer is an enterprising lumber merchant of 
Worcester. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

2980. i. Gertrude May Sawyer, b. Feb. 13, 1871, in Worcester, Mass., 
d. Jan. 29, 1872. 



5,1 '4 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Seventh Generation.] 

2960. vii. John D. Child, fifth son and seventh child of 
Hon. Dwight P. and Nancy M. (Child) Child, b. Dec. 29, 1842, 
in Bath, Grafton Co., N. H., m. Mch. 22, 1871, Julia E. Dow. 
Mr. John Child remains upon the home farm, occupying the 
house in which his parents dwelt during the earlier years of 
their married life. A noble specimen of the young manhood 

of the Granite State. 

| Eighth Generation.] Children: 

2981. i. Etta Ailine Child, b. Jan. 1, 1872, in Bath, N. H. 

2982. ii. Edith May Child, b. Sept. 15, 1873, in Bath, N. H. 

2983. iii. Dwight Penuel Child, b. Oct. 1, 1877, in Bath, N. H. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2903. x. Susan L. Child, seventh daughter and tenth child 
of Capt. John and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, N. H., 
Nov. 23, 1814, m. her brother-in-law, William Lanff, of War- 

7 7 O' 

ren, N. H., Jan. 1, 1835. % 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

2984. i. Martha Lang, b. Oct. 17, 1837, in Bath, N. H. 

2985. ii. Charles Samuel Lang, b. Aug. 30, 1844, in Bath, N. H. 

[.Sixth Generation.] 

2904. x. Hon. Bradley Gr. Child, fourth son and eleventh 
child of Capt. John and Martha Hutchins Child, b. in Bath, 
N. II., Sept. 24, 1818, in. Nov. 17, 1837, Miss Hannah Child, 
third dau. and eighth child of Elisha and Nancy (Child) Child, 
of Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y., she was b. May 21, 1816. 

Of such uniform excellence and prominent citizenship was 
this family of Capt. John Child, that one might write a descrip- 
tion of character and deed for one member and then apply it 
regularly to sons and sons-in-law indiscriminately, and yet this 
oneness of success has nowhere obliterated individuality of 
character. Enough of sterling sound sense, keen business 
ability, and uprightness of character remained to supply amply 
the eleventh child. The piercing yet genial, kindly black eye 
is surmounted with ample brain room, and crowned with the 
early almond blossoms of a gracious age, whose decades are 
scarce credited by the alert step and vigorous healthful figure ; 
a most noble specimen of the New England thoughtful farmer. 
Mr. B. G. Child has graced the board of selectmen for his town, 
and held counsel on affairs of the State in its legislative halls 
at Concord, N. H. Of a large family, Mr. and Mrs. Child have 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 375 

been called to resign many to the "Stern Reaper whose name is 

Death." 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

2986. i. Gilbert Child, b. Meh. 24. 1839. d. July 29, 1879. 

2987. ii. Edgar Child, b. Sept. 3, 1842, d. Aug. 23, L853. 

2988. iii. Charles Henry Child, b. May 28, 1846. 

2989. iv. Flora B. Child, b. June 12, 1850, d. Sept. 28, 1853. 

2990. v. Martha II. Chili., 1>. June 15, 1852, d. Aug. 15, 1853. 

2991. vi. Alice Child, 1>. Jan. 21, 1855, m. June 3, L880, Harry H. Jones. 

2992. vii. Myra II. Child, b. Sept. 17. 1858. 

2993. viii. Flora II. Child, b. Oct. 30, 1860. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2692. v. MARY Child, third dan. and fifth child of Richard 
and Abigail Green Child, b. in Thompson, Ct, Jan. 22. 1770, 
m. Jan. 3, 1795, Ebenezer Sanborn, who was b. Oct. 13, 1772. 
Mr. E. Sanborn d. Oct. 28, 1839, aged 67 years. His occupa- 
tion that of a farmer. Mrs. Mary Child Sanborn survived her 
husband some years, dying at the age of 83, April 13, 1853, in 
Jay. Vt. This family has been widely scattered, and the record 
is not as full as could be desired. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

2994. i. Matilda Sanborn, b. Meh. 2, 1796, m. Enoch Sanborn. 

2995. ii. Louisa Sanborn, ) m. April 3, 1819, Nahum Downs. 

- Twins }■ b. Nov. 26, 1797. 

2996. iii. Lanson Sanborn, \ m. Meh. 26, 1833, Almira A. Dodge. 

2997. iv. Henry Sanborn, b. Dee. 19, 1799, d. Meh. 17. 1825. aged 25 
yrs. 3 mo. 

2998. v. Anna Sanborn, b. Nov. 2, 1801, m. Adna Crandall. 

2999. vi. Hannah Sanborn, b. Nov. 29, 1803, m. Stoddard Meeker. 

3000. vii. Bradley Sanborn, b. Dec. 2, 1805, in. Emeline A. Lamb. 

3001. viii. Mary Sanborn, b. April 19, 1808, d. Sept. 19, 1810, aged 2 
yrs. 5 mo. 

3002. ix. Edmund Sanborn, b. April 16, 1812, m. Harriet R. White. 

3003. x. Martha Sanborn, b. May 28, 1814, m. Meh. 22. 1832, William 
Williams. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2994. i. Matilda Sanborn, eldest dau. and child of Mary 
Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. Meh. 2, 1796, m. about 1817. 
Enoch Sanborn. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3004. i. Jane Sanborn. Ii. Nov. 6, 1818, m. May, 1848, Abram Reuter. 
Reside at Potter, P. Q. 

3005. ii. Horace Sanborn, b. Jan. 4, 1821, m. Jan. 27, 1850, Harriet 
Hatch; Reside at North Troy, Vt. 

3006. iii. David Sanborn, b. 1S24: not living. 

3007. iv. Chester Sanborn, b. Nov. 29, 1827, in. May, 1860, Philena 
Walker. Reside at North Troy. Vt. 



376 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

3008. v. Ladora Ann Sanborn, b. Nov. 27, 1829, in. Mch. 9, 1853, John 
S. Bacon. Reside in Hatley, P. Q. 

3009. vi. Emeline Sanborn, b. 1831 ; not living. 

3010. vii. Orrin Sanborn, b. May 18, 1833, m. 1859, Jane Currier. Re- 
side in Lowell, Mass. 

3011. viii. Julia Sanborn, b. June 9, 1835, in. 1855, Solomon Elkins, of 
North Troy, Yt, 

3012. is. Almira Sanborn, b. Oct. 23, 1838, ra. 1866, Isaac Harris. Re- 
side in Piermont, N. H. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2995. ii. Louisa Sanborn, second dau. and child of Mary 
Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. Nov. 26, 1797, m. Feb. 3, 1819, 
Nahum Downs. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3013. i. Augusta Ann Downs, b. Nov. 2, 1819, m. Mr. Gove of White- 
field, N. H. 

3014. ii. Laura Downs, b. Oct. 9, 1821, in. Mr. Harriman of St. Johns- 
burg, Vt. 

3015. iii. Azro Buck Downs, b. Sept. 1, 1823. 

3016. iv. Henry Downs, b. April 3, 1825. It is reported that this family 
have all died, but the dates cannot be ascertained. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

299ti. iii. Lauson Sanborn, twin child and first son of 
Mary Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. Nov. 26, 1797, m. Mch. 
26, 1833, Almira Azuba Dodge, who was b. in January 1807. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3017. i. Josephine Sanborn, b. March 1, 1837, m. March 18, 1857, Sid- 
ney Wood; reside in Lowell, Mass. 

3018. ii. Marquanah Sanborn, b. Feb. 25, 1840, m. Dec. 6, 1858, Charles 
K. Bartlett, a wealthy farmer in Jay. Yt. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2998. v. Anna Sanborn, third dan. and fifth child of Mary 

Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. Nov. 2, 1801, m. Aclna Cran- 

dall. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3019. i. Mary Crandall. 

3020. ii. George Washington Crandall. 

3021. iii. Ebenezer Crandall. 

3022. iv. Sylvanus Crandall. 

3023. v. Bradley Crandall. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

2999. vi. Hannah Sanborn, fourth dan. and sixth child of 
Mary Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. Nov. 29, 1803, m. Stod- 
dard Meeker. Unable to obtain the date of the marriage or 
any record of the children except their names, and that one 
child married. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. •'-< < 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: (None of which are living.) 
3024. i. Caroline Meeker. 
302"). ii. Martha Meeker. 

3026. iii. Persis .Meeker. 

3027. iv. Hannah Meeker. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3000. vii. Bradley Sanborn, third son and seventh child 
of Mary Child and Bbenezer Sanborn, b. Dee. 2, 1805, m. Mch. 
20, 1833, Emeline Amanda Lamb. Mr. Sanborn d. Nov. 28, 
1853: resided in Lowell, Vt. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

302s. i. Louisa Maria Sanborn, b. June 1, 1834, m. Dee. 5, 1855, William 
C. Lyman: reside in Michigan. 

3029. ii. Sullivan Hutchins Sanborn, b. Nov. 5, 1835, d. Lee. 1869. 

3030. iii. Moody Bvandee Sanborn, b. Oct. 16, 1837. m. June 11. 1872, 
Sarah Seott : reside at Eden, Vt. 

3031. iv. Amanda Matilda Sanborn, b. Aug. 17, 1839, d. 1844. 

3032. v. Charles B. Sanborn, b. Aug. 5. 1841, m. Aug. 7. 1867, Ann M. 
Shannon ; reside in Winchester, Mass. 

3033. vi. Lanson O. Sanborn, b. Oct. 5. 1S43. m. Nov. 10. 1870, Inez A. 
Morse; reside in Lowell. Vt. 

3034. vii. Franklin Henry Sanborn, b. Nov. 8, 1S45. in. May 13. 1865, 
Ellen Kicker: reside in Lowell. Vt. 

3035. viii. Adelaide Victoria Sanborn, b. Aug. 22, 1847, d. Oct. 9, 1867. 

3036. ix. Madelon Sanborn, b. July 12, 1850, m. Dec. 7. 1865. John 
Meares; reside in Manchester, X. H. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

I : .002. ix. EDMOND Sanborn, fourth son and ninth child <>i 
Mary Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. April ltf. 1812, m. Mch. 
15, 1835, Harriet Kand White who was b. Feb. 28, 1821. 
Reside in Tex; is. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3037. i. Rebecca Newell Sanborn. Ii. Dec. 15, 1835, married twice — 1st, 
Jan. 1, 1856. Darwin Squires, who d. April 2. 1859: m. 2d, April 20, 
1860. William Jaquis; reside in Colton, N. Y. 

3038. ii Charles ('. Sanborn, b. Dec. 10, 1837, m. June 5, 1865, Eliza- 
beth Leonard; reside in Texas. 

3039. iii. Sarah Jane Sanborn, b. Jan. 11, 1^40, m. Oct. 20, 1859, Royal 
B. Squires: reside in Minnesota. 

3040. iv. Henry Bradley Saxhorn, b. Sept. 10, 1845. m. Feb. 20, 1867, 
Ellen M. Wheeler: reside in Texas. 

3041. v. Hattie A. Sanborn, b. Jan. 1, 1859. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3<>03. x. Martha Sanborx, sixth dau. and tenth child of 
Mary Child and Ebenezer Sanborn, b. May 28, 1814, in. Mch. 
22, L832, William Williams, who was b. Feb. 5, 1803. Of 
C-i 



378 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

the large family given to Mr. and Mrs. Williams eight have 
attained maturity, and entered upon successful business 
careers. Five are engaged in mercantile pursuits in Provi- 
dence, R I., two in business in Chicago, 111. One dau. only is 
living, married to a farmer in easy circumstances, and resides 
near her parents, whose home is in South Tro}^, Vt. To Mrs. 
Williams we are much indebted for her kindly aid in obtain- 
ing such statistics as we have of her brothers, and sisters and 
their families. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3042. i. Effingham Howard Williams, b. June 9, 1834, m. March 28, 
1859. Thirza Jane Harris; reside in Providence, R. I. 

3043. ii. Eliza Jane Williams, b. Oct. 21, 1836, m. July?, 1859, Horace 
Freeman Bartlett: reside in Newport, Vt. 

3044. iii. Marckllus Dow Williams, b. Dec. 8, 1838, in. June 7, 1870, 
Hattie Jane Thompson; reside in Providence, R. I. 

3045. iv. Martha Ann Williams, b. Sept. 8, 1840, m. March 28, 1858, 
Darius Loring Hildreth. Mrs. M. A. Williams Hildreth d. in 1802 in 
Newport, Vt. 

3046. v. William Harvey Williams, b. Jan. 27, 1844, m. Sept. 25, 1869, 
Abby Jane Gilpin, reside in Providence, R. I. 

3047. vi. Mark Byron Williams, b. Feb. 27, 1846, d. 1852. 

3048. vii. Eugene Loren Williams, b. Aug. 22, 1848, m. Oct. 31, 1875, 
Lucia Durell; reside in Providence, R I. 

3049. viii. Oscar Burton Williams, b. Sept. 14, 1851, m. May 12, 1878, 
Minnie Jane Mills; reside in Providence, R. I. 

3050. ix. Ida Williams, b. July 2, 1853, d. 1854. 

3051. x. Don Fernando Williams, b. June 11, 1855; resides in Chi- 
cago, 111. 

3052. xi. Cortez Elmer Williams, b. May 30, 1859; resides in Chi- 
cago, 111. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2693. vi. Abigail Child, fourth dau. and sixth child of 
Richard and Abigail Green Child, b. in Thompson, Ct , July 
6, 1771, m. in Strafford, Vt., Nov. 27, 1794, Samuel West, 
who was b. Sept. 17, 1768. Mrs. Abigail Child West, pos- 
sessed of the best qualities of head and heart, brought up 
her large family to respect goodness and aim for its attainment, 
to cultivate and care for mind and body as sure and certain 
avenues to upright lives. A grandson, Mr. George E. West, 

writes : 

"My grandmother died 24 years ago, in my father's family, when I was 
only 16 years of age, but I remember her very distinctly as a woman of 
sterling worth, who could repeat from memory more passages of Scripture 
and Watts' Hymns, than any other person I ever knew. I greatly revere 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 379 

her memory, and Eor me to collate these records of her posterity has been 
indeed 'a labor of love.' " 

Mr. Samuel West died Nov. 20, 1855, se 87. Mrs. Abigail 
Child West died Nov. 0, 1856, ;e 85. "Her children arise up, 
and call her blessed." — Prow 31. 28. From the Vermont 
Chronicle we make the following extracts, as illustrating tin' 
public estimate of Mr. and Mrs. West. The dates of their 
deaths we have previously given, so will omit the statistical 
portion of these obituary notices; only premising that the 
deaths occurred almost exactly one year apart : 

'•Mr. West was born in Concord, N. H. When quite young his parents 
removed to Strafford, Vi., where, and in Bath, N. H., he resided until 
1827. when he removed to Troy, Vt. He was a worthy member of the Con- 
gregational church, exemplary and punctual mail the duties both of a chris- 
tian and a citizen, beloved and respected by all who knew him, and has at 
last, full of years, left the congregation of the church militant on earth to 
join, as we humbly hope, the assembly of the church triumphant in 
heaven." Of Mrs. West it is said: " She resided most of her life in Bath, 
N.H., and Troy, Vt. In early life she united with the Congregational 
church, of which she has been a consistent member, and died as she had 
lived in the faith and hope of the gospel." 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3058. i. Richard Child West, b. May 29. 1705, m. July 29, 1822, Sarah 
Dickerson. 

3054. ii. Jonathan West. b. -Tan. 26, 1797, m. Oct. 31, 1824, Sarah Law- 
rence. 

3055. iii. Timothy West. b. Oct. 28, 1798, m. March 28, 1830, Mary 
Gordon. 

305G. iv. Samuel West, Jr.. b. Nov. 30, 1800, m. Feb. 21, 1828, Miss 
Thomas. 

3057. v. Abiel West. b. Nov. 13, 1802, m. 1st, Jan. 7, 1838, Sophia Ann 
Piatt; m. 2d, Sept. 20, 1846, Louisa Ashley. 

3058. vi. Harry Lovejoy West, b. May 3, 1805, m. 1st, April 7, 1827, 
Phoebe Dickerson; m. 2d, Oct. 8, 1851, . 

3059. vii. Erastus West, b. July 17, 1807, m. Dec. 3, 1855, Maria Marsh: 
resides in N. Troy. Vt. 

3060. viii. Dudley West, b. Oct, 15, 1809, m. Jan. 1, 1839, Mary E. 
Powers. 

3061. ix. Hannah West, b. Feb. 18, 1812, m. Feb. 24, 1856, Edward 
Stevens; reside in Troy, Vt. 

3062. x. Theron West, b. Aug. 28. 1814, in Bath, N. H., d. Feb. 25, 
1815. 38. 5 mo., 27 d. 

3063. xi. Theron West, 2d, b. Aug. 15, 1816, in Bath, N. H., d. April 16, 
1829, in Troy, Vt., as. 12 y. 8 mo. 1 d. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3053. i. Richard Child West, eldest son and child of 
Abigail Child and Samuel West, b. in Strafford, Vt., May 29, 



380 BENJAMIN CHILI' OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

1795, m. July 29, 1822, Sarah Dickerson. He d. in 1857, 

». 62. at Painted Post. Steuben Co.. X. Y. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3064. i. Charles Francis West. b. Dec. 20, 1832. 

3065. ii. Richard Hexry West, b. Jan. 9. 1825, d. July 1. Is30. 

3066. iii. John Watson We>t, b. Feb. 17. 1S27 ? d. Aug. 18, 182a 

3067. iv. Amanda Kose We-t, b. Jul 18. L829. 

3068. v. Henrietta We-t. b. April 1832, d. 1851. 

3069. vi. Mary Caroline West. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3054 ii. Jonathan West, second son and child of Abigail 
Child and Samuel West. b. in Strafford, Vt.. Jan. 26. 1797. m. 
■ i . 31, 1824, Sarah Lawrence. He d. Meh. 1^. 1^7'l ae. 79, 
at Port Jervis. Orange Co.. X. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3070. i. William Lawrence We?t. b. Oct. 5, 1825. 

3071. ii. Albert Samuel West. b. Feb. 25, 1827. 

3072. iii. George Clinton West. - t. 18, 1828. 

3073. iv. Henry Farnum West. b. Scot. 18, 1830. 
74. v. Sarah Abigail West. , b. Feb. 19. 1832. 

- Twins. 

3075. vi. Mary Caroline We ; t. \ b. Feb. 19, 1832, d. ae. 2 w.. 2 d. 

3076. vii. Ann Maria West. b. Nov. 14. 1*34. 

3077. viii. Dudley Francis Wbst, b. 1838. 
78 \. John Child West, b. Dec 28. 18 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3055 iii. Timothy West, third son and child of Abigail 
Child and Samuel West. b. in Strafford, Vt, Oct 28, 1798, m. 
M ... 28, 1830, Mary Gordon. He d. Men. 8, 1875, ae. 76 vrs.. 
4 mo . 10 d., at Sooth Hadley Falls. Mass. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 
3079. i. Samuel Curtis West, b. March 25, 1831, d. March 13, 1867. 
80. ii. Mary Lucretia West. b. Nov. 21. 1- . 
31. iii. Phcebe Jane West. b. Jan. 7. 1834. .1. Dee. 27. 18 

3082. iv. William Edwin West. b. May 26, > a 

3083. v. Sophia Ann West. b. May 10. 1S37. 
3u*4. vi. David Bard West. b. Jan. 2 •. 18 
3085. vii. Charles Henry West. b. Oct. 2, 1841. 

96. viii. Abby Jane West. b. June 13, 18 
3087. ix. Ruby Emeline West. b. March 7. 1S4T. d. Oct. 3, 1873. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3056. iv. Samuel West. Jr.. fourth son and child of Abigail 
Child and Samuel West. b. in Stratford. Vt.. Nov. 30, 1800, m. 
Feb. 21. J828, Miss Thomas: residence Lumberland ; X. Y. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 381 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3C88. i. Oscar Thomas West, b. Dee. 11, 1828. 

3089. ii. James West, b. May 11, 1830, d. Nov. 25, 1840. 

3090. iii. Almira West, b. Feb. 16, 1832. 

3091. iv. Mary Caroline West, b. 1834, d. Jan. 18, 1837, ;e. 3 years. 

3092. v. Sarah Matilda West, b. Oct. 1835. 

3093. vi. Harlan Page West, b. April 13, 1839. 

3094. vii. Phcebe Maria West, b. May 11, 1841. d. Dec. 29, 1841. 

3095. viii. Marietta West, b. Nov. 13, 1843. 

3096. ix. Theodore West, b. Aug. 12, 1845. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3057. v. Abiel West, fifth .son and child of Abigail Child 
and Samuel West, b. Nov. 13, 1802, in Strafford, Vt., married 
twice — 1st, Jan. 7, 1838, Sophia Ann Piatt; m. 2d, Sept, 20, 
1846, Louisa Ashley. Mr. Abiel West d. Oct. 12, 1878, ae. 
75 years, 10 months 29 days, at Glens Falls, Warren Co., N.Y. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3097. i. Sarah Jane West, b. Oct. 22, 1838, d. Nov. 7, 1839. 

3098. ii. Charles Henry West, b. Sept. 8, 1840. d. Oct. 1841. 

Children by second wife: 

3099. iii. George Henry West, b. July 1, 1847. 

3100. iv. Chandler Abiel West, b. Aug-. 5, 1849. 

3101. v. Nancy Abigail West, b. Jan. 1, 1852. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3058. iv. Harry Lovejoy West, sixth son and child of 
Abigail Child and Samuel West, b. in Bath, Grafton Co., N. H., 
May 3, 1805, m. twice— 1st, April 7, 1827, Phoebe Dickerson ; 
m. 2d, Oct. 8, 1851. He d. March 31, 1868, aged 62 years, 9 
months, 28 days, at Sparrowbush, Orange Co., N. Y. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3102. i. Marietta West, b. Nov. 21, 1827. 

3103. ii. Hannah West, b. June 28, 1829. 

3104. iii. Frederick Augustus West. b. .lime 2. 1831. 

3105. iv. Adaline West. 

3106. v. Adaline Augusta W t est, I). Any. 25, 1836. 

3107. vi. George West, b. July 30, 1839. 

3108. vii. Martha Jane West, b. Feb. 4, 1842. 

3109. viii. Delia Ann West, b. Sept. 11, 1845. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

3060. viii. Dudley West, eighth son and child of Abigail 
Child and Samuel West, b. in Bath, Grafton Co., N. H., Oct. 
15, 1809, m. Jan. 1, 1839, Mary E. Powers. He d. Dec. 22, 
1862, aged 53 years, 2 months, 7 days, in Bath, N. H. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3110. i. George Edwin West, b. Oct. 24, 1839. [To whom we are in- 
debted for the record of the West family.] 



382 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

3111. ii. Augustus Dudley West, b. July 13, 1841, d. May 10, 1869. 

3112. iii. Dwight Lang West, b. Mch. 27, 1843. 

3113. iv. Sarah Jane West, b. Feb. 25, 1845. 

3114. v. Henry Green West, b. Sept, 11, 1846, d. Mch. 2, 1871. 

3115. vi. Luvia Sabrjna West, b. Jan. 6, 1849, d. Jan. 13, 1861. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2694. vii. Rosa Anna Child, fifth dau. and seventh child 
of Richard and Abigail Green Child, b. Jan. 2, 1774, m. in 
Thompson, Windham Co., Ct, Jan. 1, 1794. Samuel Hutchins 
Mr. Hutchins was b. in Haverhill, Mass., in 17'69. He com- 
bined mercantile and agricultural pursuits with large success, 
and was yet farther enriched with the patriarchal complement 
of children. Mr. Hutchins d. in Bath, N. H., in 1830. Mrs. 
Hutchins surviving him some fourteen years, d. July 10, 1844. 
at the age of seventy. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3116. i. Hannah Hutchins, 1». Sept. 29, 1794, in. May 9, 1812, Ira 
Goodall. 

3117. ii. Ezra C. Hutchins, b. April 10, 1796, in. Feb. 7, 1821, Augusta 
A. F. Sinclair. 

3118. iii. Samuel Hutchins, Jr., b. Dec. 26, 1797, m. 1st, Mch. 29, 1829, 
Martha Rix ; in. 2d, Aug. 1841, Rebecca Moore. 

3119. iv. Lucretia Hutchins, b. Sept. 8, 1799. m. Oct. 1819, Gen. John 
Wilson. 

3120. v. Persis Hutchins, b. July 16, 1801, in. May 1823, John Hurd. 

3121. vi. Rosanna Hutchins, b. Jan. 26, 1803, m. Luther Foote. 

3122. vii. Chester C. Hutchins, b. July 6, 1805, m. Feb. 12, 1835, Jane 
Swan. 

3123. viii. Moses P. Hutchins, b. June 8, 1808. m. 1st, Jane Johnstone; 
m. 2d, Eliza Morris; m. 3d, Jane Grey. 

3124. ix. Horace G. Hutchins, b. July 20, 1811. in. Oct. 22, 1844, Julia 
Hurd. 

3125. x. Martha Hutchins, b. Dec. 15, 1813, d. June 17. 1815. 

3126. xi. Martha S. Hutchins, b. Mch. 1817, m. 1840, Warren D. 
Gookin. 

3127. xii. Henry C. Hutchins, b. Aug. 1, 1820, m. Oct, 9, 1845, Mary L. 
Groat, 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3116 i. Hannah Hutchins, eldest child of Rosanna Child 
and Samuel Hutchins, b. in Bath, N. H., Sept. 29, 1794, m- 
May 9, 1812, Hon. Ira Goodall, Esq., of Bath, N. H.; a lawyer of 
mark in the State. Mrs. Hannah H. Goodall d. June 3, 1872, 
in West Philadelphia. Pa. Esq. Goodall d. Mch. 3, 1S6S, in 
Madison, Wis. 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 3>3 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3128. i. David G, Goodall, b. Mch. 19,1813, m. June 29, 1835, Maria 
D. French. Mr. Goodall was firsi residenl in Lisbon, X. II.. asa merehanl ; 
since removed to Beloit. Wis. 

3120. ii. Hannah C. Goodall, b. Dee. 17. 1814. 

3130. iii. Ldcretl* W. Goodall, b. Feb. 9, 1817. m. July 1840. John L. 
Carleton, a lawyer of Bath, N. II. 

3131. iv. Ellen B. Goodall, b. Nov. 27, 1818. ro. Dec 3, 1845, John H. 
French. 

3132. v. Ira E. Goodall, b. June 25, 1820, m. Sept. 26, 1842, Mary 
French. 

3133. vi. Samuel II. Goodall. b. Mch. 31, 1823, m. l>t. May 1850; in. 
2d. Sept. 26, 1867. E. P. Nelson. 

3134. vii. Horace H. Goodall, b. Mch. 20, 1826, d. Aug. 21, 1827. 

3135. viii. Horace II. Goodall, 1». Mch. 21. 1828, d. Aug. 23, 1829. 

3136. ix. Jane E. Goodall, Ii. June 17. 1830. in. Dec. 13, 1854. Thomas 
P. Sargent. 

3137. x. Julia R. Goodall, 1.. April 14, 1833. m. Nov. 2. 1853, Alonzo 
I*. Carpenter, Esq.; lawyer in Bath, N. H. 

3138. xi. Edward B. Goodall. t in. Mch. 5. 1863, Louise Bartlett. 

- Twins ; b. Jan. 10, 1838. 

3139. xii. Francis H. Goodall. \ m. Aug. 24, 1865, Ophelia P. Brewer. 

[Edward B. Goodall is a dentist of Portsmouth. N. H. Francis II. Good- 
all a lawyer, and clerk in Second Auditor's Office, Treasury Department. 
Washington, D. C] 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2695. viii. Dea. Dudley Child, third son and eighth child 
of Richard and Abigail Green Child, b. in Thomspon. Wind- 
ham Co., Ct., May 22, 1776, m. 1st, April 24, 1800, Molly 
Weeks, who was b. Nov. 12. 177S. d. in 1831. Dea. Child 
m. 2d. Sept. 1832. Mrs. Nancy Child, widow of Elisha Child. 
of Exeter, Otsego Co., N. Y.. and dan of Capt. Willard Child. 
of Woodstock, Ct. 

Dea Dudley Child removed when quite a young man to 
Bath. N. H., sharing with his brother. Capt John Child, and 
his brother-indaw, Mr. Ezra Child, the privations incident to 
the settlement of a new country. These three families formed 
a nucleus around which a neighborhood of industrious, hardy 
and sober people gathered ; laying the foundations of a pros- 
perous community which grew rapidly in numbers and import- 
ance. When the religious element was embodied in a Con- 
gregational church, Dea. Child was early chosen an office-bearer, 
and served in the capachVy of deacon with efficiency till his 
death. The Scotch element was a noticeable feature in the 
order and theological phase of this community, having been 



384 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

thus moulded by the Eev. Mr. Sutherland, a Scotch Presby- 
terian, whose impress remained upon this people long after the 
stern old divine had entered into his reward. Dea. Dudley 
Child died May 22, 1846. Mrs. Nancy (Child) Child died March 
23, 1850. Her children were of her first marriage, Dea. Dud- 
ley's children of his union with Mrs. M. W. Child. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3140. i. Charity Child, b. April 11, 1801, d. Oct. 8, 1807, in Bath, N. II. 

8141. ii. Theodosia Child, b. Sept. 17. 1802. in. Sept. 23, 1824, Stephen 
N. Bartlett. 

3142. iii. David Child, b. Mch. 29. 1805, m. Meh. 22, 1827. Charlotte 
Moulton. 

3143. iv. Luthera Child, b. Oct. 25, 1806, in. May 6. 1827, Amos K. 
Heath. 

3144. v. Molly Child, b. Feb. 7, 1809, d. Mch. 31, 1812. 

3145. vi. Dudley Child, b. Oct. 21. 1810, d. Aug. 21, 1814. 

3146. vii. Willard Child, b. Aug. 23, 1812. d. Jan. 23, 1813. 

3147. viii. Richard Child, b. Feb. 20. 1814, m. Sept, 1. 1839, Adaline 
Smith. 

3148. ix. Mary Child, b. Mch. 13, 1816, m. Jan. 25, 1838, Smith Moulton. 

3149. x. Dudley Child. 2d, b. Mch. 27. 1819, m. Dec. 22, 1842, Hannah 
Hibbard. 

3150. xi. Jonathan Child, b. Feb. 10, 1821, in. Mch. 4, 1846. Martha N. 
Walker. 

3151. xii. Willard Child, 2d. b. Nov. 19, 1828, d. Dec. 15, 1857, at 
Grinnell, Iowa. 

[Sixth Generation ] 

31-41. ii. Theodosia Child, second dau. and child of Dea. 
Dudley and Mary Weeks Child, b. in Bath, N. H , Sept. 17, 
1802, m. Sept. 23, 1824, Stephen N. Bartlett, by the Rev. 
David Sutherland. Mr. Stephen N. Bartlett is the son of Amos 
and Eunice K. Noyes Bartlett, of Bath, N. H. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen N. Bartlett removed to Grinnell, Iowa, in May 1855, 
with their family of five children, where he died 1880. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3152. i. Eliza Ann Bartlett, b. in Bath, N. H., Sept, 18. 1828. d. Oct. 
27. 1864, in Grinnell, Iowa. 

3153. ii. Emery S. Bartlett, b. in Bath, N. H., Sept. 7, 1832. 

3154. iii. Moses W. Bartlett, b. in Bath, N. H.. Feb. 26, 1834. 

3155. iv. Stanley M. Bartlett. b. in Bath, N. H., Dec. 4, 1836. 

3156. v. Philomela M. Bartlett, b. in Bath, N. H.. July 23, 1839. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3142. iii. David Child, eldest son and third child of Dea. 
Dudley and Mary Weeks Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Mch. 29, 
1805, m. Mch. 22, 1827, Charlotte Moulton, who was b. Mch. 
13, 1 8 1 1 : is a dau. of John and Mary Moulton, of Lyman, N. H. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 385 

Mr. David Child as the elder son of a pioneer, made early 
acquaintance with the hardships inevitable in a new country. 
His surroundings, however, were not unfavorable to the de- 
velopment of sturdy and manly qualities, suited to lit him for 
a respected and useful citizenship in the town of his birth. 
His education was such as the town schools of that period 
afforded, and quite sufficient to awaken him to the full value 
and appreciation of good scholarship. His marriage to a 
worthy daughter of honorable parentage was the beginning of 
a new era and an added stimulus to his efforts in the life strug- 
gle. His industry and economy enabled him not only to gain 
a competence for himself and his growing family, but to ac- 
cumulate a handsome property. In the spirit of enterprise, 
inherent and fostered, he left his native hills, with the honor- 
ing good-will of his townsmen, and settled in Nevada, Story 
Co., Iowa. Surrounded by a goodly family of sons and daugh- 
ters, he expects here to spend the evening of life, trusting the 
honest toil of the morning will gild the sun-setting. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3157. i. Chester Child, b. in Bath, X. H., July 24,1828, m. Dec. 25, 
1858, Margaret A. Daley, dau. of Wilson and Margaret Daley, of Nevada, 
Iowa. Mr. Chester child d. at Nevada, Iowa, Oct. 24, 1867. 

3158. ii. Charity Child, b. in Bath. N. H., Sept, 1830, in. Feb. 1, 1852. 
Theodore Lawrence, of Saratoga, X. Y. 

3159. iii. George Child, b. Dec. 15, 1832, m. Oct. 9, 1853, Lavina Hall. 

3160. iv. Eliza Child, b. April 3, 1835, m. Feb. 19, 1825. S. S. Webb. 

3161. v. Smith M. Child, b. Oct. 5. 1836, m. June 10. 1867, Rachel L. 
Trumbull. 

3162. vi. Le Roy Child, b. Oct. 1. 1838, m. Dec. 27, 1864. Lida J. 
ELeizer. 

3163. vii. Samuel M. Child, b. June 27, 1840, m. June 1867, Mary E. 
Harding. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3158. ii. Charity: Child, eldest dau. and second child of 
David and Charlotte Moulton Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Sept. 
1S30, m. Feb. 1, 1852. Theodore Lawrence, of Saratoga, N. Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence reside in Peoria, 111. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3164. i. Albert Lawrence, b. at Peoria, 111., June 2, 1853, d. Jan. 17, 
1854. 

3165. ii. Hattie Lawrence, b. at Peoria. 111., Feb. 2, 1855, unin. 

3166. iii. Alvah Lawrence, b. at Peoria, 111., June 16, 1857, unra. 

3167. iv. May Charlotte Lawrence, b. at Peoria, 111., May 2, 1860, unm. 

3168. v. Luella Lawrence, b. at Peoria, 111., Sept. 1. 1862, unm. 



'■»'> BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBURY, MASS 



3199. vi. Cora Lawrence, b. at Peoria, 111., July 2, 1865, d. Oct. 9, 1866. 

3170. vii. Ida Elizabeth Lawrence, b. in Peoria, 111., Jan. 3, 1868. 

3171. viii. David C. Lawrence, b. in Peoria, 111., July 9, 1870, d. Oct. 
26, 1873. 

3172. ix. Walter Chester Lawrence, b. in Peoria, 111., Jan. 2. 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3159. iii. George Child, second son and third child of 
David and Charlotte Moulton Child, b. in Bath, N. H, Dec. 15, 
1832, m. Oct. 9, 1853, Lavina Hall, dan. of Alba and Elizabeth 
Hall, of Hanover, N. H. She was b. April 14, 1833. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3173. i. Fanny Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Jan. 27, 1857, d. July 26, 1858. 

3174. ii. Hattie C. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Oct. 6, 1859. 

3175. iii. Willie W. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Jan. 7, 1862. 

3176. iv. George C. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Sept. 2, 1864. 

3177. v. Harry F. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Oct. 3, 1808. 

3178. vi. Burt B. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Feb. 2, 1871. 

3179. vii. Mary E. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Sept. 18, 1875. 

3180. viii. Freddie E. Child, b. in Nevada, Iowa, Dec. 22, 1877, 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3160. iv. Eliza Child, second dau. and fourth child of 
David and Charlotte Moulton Child, b. in Bath, N. H., April 
3, 1835, m. Feb. 1, 1852, S. S. Webb, who was b. Aug. 15 T 
182-1, in Charlestown, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Webb reside at 

Boone, Iowa. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3181. i. Charles P. Webb, b. at Nevada, Iowa, June 19, 1857. 

3182. ii. Etta P. Webb, b. at Nevada, Iowa, May 6, 1861. 

[Seventh Generation. ] 

3161. v. Smith M. Child, third son and fifth child of David 
and Charlotte Moulton Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Oct, 5, 1830, 
m. June 10, 1867, Rachel L. Trumbull. Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
M. Child reside at Dunlap, Iowa. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3183. i. Charlotte M. Child, b. at Dunlap, Iowa, May 8, 1868, d. Oct. 
23, 1870. 

3184 ii. Samuel T. Child, b. at Dunlap. Iowa. Oct, 13, 1871, d. Oct. 19. 
1871. 

3185. iii. Edward A. Child, b. at Dunlap, Iowa, Mch. 9, 1873. 

3186. iv. David B. Child, b. at Dunlap, Iowa, June 1, 1875. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3 162. vi. Le Roy Child, fourth son and sixth child of 
David and Charlotte Moulton Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Dec. 
17, 1838, m. Dec. 27, 1864, Lida J. Heizer, dau. of Mathew 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 387 

and Mary Heizer. of [ndianapolis, Indiana. She was b. June 

1. 18-1:6. Mr. and Mrs. Le Hoy Child reside in Indianapolis, 

Indiana. 

[Eighth Generation J Children: 

3187. i. Jesse Child, b. Sept. 28. 1805, at Nevada, Iowa. 

3188. ii. Pearl Child, b. Meh. 6, 1873, at Indianapolis, Ind. 
:5189. Hi. Fred Child, b. June 20, 1875, at Indianapolis, Ind. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3163. vii. Samuel M. Child, fifth son and seventh child of 
David and Charlotte Monlton Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Jan. 27, 
1840, m. dune 1867. Mary E. Harding, who was b. July 2, 1846. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Child reside in Atlantic. Iowa. 
[Eighth Generation ] Children: 

3190. i. Lulu Child, b. May 5. 1869. at Atlantic, Iowa. 

3191. ii. Charlie C. Child, b. July 19, 1871, at Atlantic, Iowa. 

3192. iii. Lizzie H. Child, 1>. Aug. 15, 1873, at Atlantic, Iowa. 

3193. iv. Ctertie Child, b. Nov. 23, 1875. at Atlantic. Iowa. 

[Sixth Generation] 

3143. iv. Luthkra Child, fourth child and third dau. of 
Dea. Dudley and Mary Weeks Child b. in Bath, N". H., Oct, 
25, 180H, in. May 6, 1827, Amos K. Heath, who was b. Sept. 

30, 1800. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children; 

3194. i. Joseph Heath, b. Feb. 26, 1828, m. abt. 1859, Anna Karney. 

3195. ii. Dudley Child Heath, b. March 11, 1830. 
3190. iii. Mary C. Heath, b. Aug. 23, 1832. 

3197. iv. Abner F. Heath, b. March 2, 1835, m. April 17, 1869, Susan 
Page. 

3198. v. Sophia T. Heath, b. Dec. 11, 1837, m. Henry 0. Sargent. 

3199. vi. Everett K. Heath, b. April 23, 1840, m. June 6, 1872, Ella 
Gould. * 

3200. vii. William YV. Heath, b Sept. 3, 1842, d. May 5, 1864. 

3201. viii. Henry K. Heath, b. Jan. 30, 1845, m. March 17, 1868, Sarah 
Scales. 

3202. ix. VVillard C. Heath, b. May 23, 1846, m. June 0. 1872. Anna 
Gould. 

3203. x. Edward K. Heath, b. June 17, 1849. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

3194. i. Joseph Heath, eldest child of Luthera Child and 

Amos K. Heath, b. Feb. 26. 1828, m. abt. 1S59, Anna Karney 

of Melbourne, Australia. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3204. i. Amos K. Heath, b. 1860. 

3205. ii. Joseph Heath, b. 1869. 



388 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3199. vi. Everett K. Heath, fourth son and sixth child of 
Luthera Child and Amos K. Heath, b. April 23, 1840. m. 
June 6, 1872, Ella Gould. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3206. i. William W. Heath, 1). Jan. 20, 1873. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3201. viii. Henry K. Heath, sixth son and eighth child of 
Luthera Child and Amos K. Heath, b. Jan. 30, 1845, m. Mch. 
17, 1872, Sarah Scales. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3207. i. Nellie S. Heath, b. Sept. 4, 1872, d. Aug. 3, 1876. 

[ Sixth Generation.] 

3147. viii. Richard Child, fourth son and eighth child of 
Dea. Dudley and Mary Weeks Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Feb. 
20, 1814, m., by Rev. Mr. Nichols, Sept. 1, 1839, Miss Adaline 
Smith, who was b. Sept. 29, 1810, and is a dau. of Reuben and 
Lydia Hill Smith, of Lyman, N. H. Mr. Richard Child, one 
of the younger sons of Dea. Dudley Child spent the earlier 
part of his life in his native town. His struggles with the 
difficulties of life have thoroughly taxed his nerve and cour- 
age, but possessing an earnestly industrious temperament, he 
has not known want. Hoping to win more readily the smiles 
of fortune, Mr. Child removed with his family, in 1868, to 
Nevada, Story Co., Iowa, where ampler fields awaited cultiva- 
tion with less severe tax upon all the vital energies, and better 
opportunities offered for the advancement of his children. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

3208. i. Excellence Augusta Child, b. April 24, 1841. m. Jan. 14, 1863, 
by Rev. Dudley Kimball to Ephraim Page Colby. Removed to Iowa in 
October 1871. 

3209. ii. Lydia Ann Child, I). Mch. 19, 1843, m. April 6, 1870, Joseph 
Bellamore. 

3210. iii. Mary Arvilla Child, b. Aug. 25, 1845, m. Feb. 2, 1868, by 
Rev. Mr. Hurd, in Indian Town, Iowa, to Abel Ruggles. 

3211. iv. Nancy Maria Child, b. July 28, 1847, m. Nov. 1, 1872, Albert 
Coffin. 

3212. v. Dudley Richard Child, b. Jan. 17, 1849, d. Aug. 5, 1853. 

3213. vi. Emily Asenath Child, b. Feb. 2, 1852, m. April 5, 1870, John 
P. Willson. 

3214. vii. Reuben Le Roy Child, b. Oct. 29, 1853. m. Dec. 25, 1876, 
Lucy Crippen. 

3215. viii. Infant— unchristened — b. Sept. 29, 1855, d. same day. 

3216. ix. Infant — unchristened — b. Oct. 10, 1857, d. same day. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 389 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3209. ii. Lydia Ann Child, second dan. and child of Rich- 
ard and Adaline Smith Child, b. in Bath, N. H.. Mch. 19, 184:;. 
m. in Indian Town, Iowa, by Rev. Mr. Hurd, April 6, 1870, 
Joseph Bellamore. 

| Eighth Generation.] Child : 

3217. i. Albert Henry Bellamore, b. Oct. 31. 1874. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3^11. iv. Nancy Mama Child, fourth dan. and child of 
Richard and Adaline Smith Child, b. in Bath, N. H., July 28, 
1847. m. in Nevada, Story Co., Iowa, by Rev. Mr. Thompson. 
Nov. 1, 1872, Albert Coffin. 
| Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3218. i. Albert B. Coffin, b. Dee. 19. 1874. 

3219. ii. Mary Adaline Coffin, l>. Nov. 1, 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3213. vi. Emily Asenath Child, fifth dan. and sixth child 
of Richard and Adaline Smith Child, b. in Bath, N. H., Feb. 
2, 1852. m. in Nevada, Iowa, by Rev. Mr. Williams, April 5, 
1870, John P. Willson. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3220. i. adaline Almira Willson, b. Oct. 9, 1872 

3221. ii. Mary Ella Willson, b. Sept, 1, 1874. 

3222. iii. Elizabeth Livingston Willson, b. Sept. 25, 1876. 

3223. iv. Richard Augustus Willson, b. Aug. 21. 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3214. vii. Reuben Le Roy Child, second son and seventh 
child of Richard and Adaline Smith Child, b. in Bath, N. H., 
Oct. 29, 1853. m. in Nevada, Iowa, by Rev. Mr. Reed, Dec. 25, 
1876, Lucy Crippin, 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3224. i. Edgar R. Child, Ii. Jan. 6, 1878. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3148. ix. Mary Child, fifth dan. and ninth child of Dea. 
Dudley and Mary Weeks Child, b. in Bath. Grafton Co.. N. H., 
Mch. 13,1816, m. Jan. 25, 1838, Smith Monlton. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3225 i. Gillespie Motjlton, b.Oct. 11,1838, d. Sept. 20, 1839 

3226. ii. Charity S. Motjlton, b. April 30, 1840, m. Feb. 12, 1861, R. 
Manson Ash. 

3227. iii. Julia E. Moulton, b. June 3, 1842, m. Dec. 4, 1872, James L. 
Cutting. 

3228. iv. Mary L. Motjlton, b. March 11, 1844, m. March 29, 1876, 
Henry C. Nelson. 

3229. v. Dudt.fy C. Motjlton, b. Dee. 10, 1847, m. May 26, 1870, Mary 
J. George. 



390 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3226. ii. Charity S. Moulton, eldest dau. and second 
child of Mary Child and Smith Moulton, b. April 30, 1840, m. 
Feb. 12, 1861, R. Manson Ash. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3230. i. Frank H, Ash, b. Dee. 21, 1861. 

3231. ii. Clinton M. Ash, b. Feb. 17, 1863, d. Feb. 23, 1872. 

[Seventh Generation. 

3229. v. Dudley Child Moulton, youngest son and child 
of Mary Child and Smith Moulton, b. Dec. 10, 1S17, m. May 
26, 1870, Mary J. George. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3232. i. Lizzie A. Moulton, b. July 12, 1871. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3119. x. Dudley Child, Jr., fifth son and tenth child of 
Dea. Dudley and Mary Weeks Child, b. in Bath, Grafton Co., 
N. H., Mcli. 27, 1819, m. Dec. 22, 1812, Hannah Hibbard, dau. 
of Hon. John and Abigail Child Hibbard. 

Upon his father s decease, he was installed as possessor of 
the old homestead. From an elevation of land a few rods from 
his door, with a glass, one can discern the Summit House on 
Mount Washington, the highest point of ascent in the White 
Mountains ; while the long panorama of mountains stretch out 
and up their bold, rugged peaks in full view. Mr. Dudley 
Child is the only one of his father's numerous family remain- 
ing in Bath. The fertile prairies of the West having allured 
most of them to imigrate. Mr. Child may be regarded one of 
the substantial citizens of the town ; a man of steady habits, an 
excellent farmer, and a cordial supporter of the institutions of 
learning and religion. He and his cousins, Hons. Dwight R. 
and Bradley G. Child, share almost alternately the trustee- 
ship of their school district. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3233. i. Ellen M. Child, b. Sept. 28, 1845, d. Dec. 24, 1868, in Bath, N. H. 

3234. ii. Elisha H. Child, b. June 27, 1849, d. Feb. 24, 1859, in Bath, 
N. H. 

3235. iii. Edwin W. Child, b. May 4, 1852, in Bath, N. H. 

3236. iv. Lizzie J. Child, b. Nov. 22, 1855, in. April 6, 1880, Sanborn W. 
Belden, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3237. v. Franklin L. Child, b. Dec. 31, 1858, in Bath, N. H. 

3238. vi. John Hibbard Child, b. May 1, 1862, d. 1863, in Bath. N. H 



AND EIS DESCENDANTS. 391 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3150. xi. Jonathan Child, sixth son and eleventh child of 
Dea. Dudley and Mary Weeks Child, b. in Hath. X. 11.. Feb. 
10, 1821. m. in the same place by Rev. David Sutherland, Mch. 
4-, LS4i;. Martha Hutchins Walker, dan. of Hannah Child and 
Leonard Walker, of Bath. Mr. Jonathan Child, youngest but 
one of twelve children, came upon the stage of life after the 
severities of pioneer days in Bath were passed : he escaped 
therefore much which the elder brothers and sisters so cour- 
ageously overcame. For him life opened with more of sun- 
shine, the progress of society in matters civil and religious. 
rendered all its conditions easier. His natural endowments 
enabled him to command the respect of his fellow-citizens in 
his native town, while resident there, and qualified him to win 
equal honors and esteem when established in the western home, 
to which he removed in the spring of 1868. In the flourishing 
town of Grinnell, Iowa, Mr. Child has made for himself an 
honorable position. In all the ways through which he has 
been called to walk, he has found a true help -meet in his wife, 
whose honorable parentage guaranteed all which time has 

wrought out. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3239. i. Chloe Walker Child, b. Dec. 24. 1846. in Bath, X. II.. a deaf 
mute, educated at Hartford, Conn. 

3240. ii. Sylvia Hannah Child, b. Oct. 1G, 1850, d. Oct. 18, 1850. 

3241. iii. Aldace Walker Child, b. Jan. 11, 1852, m. Sept. 7, 1875, 
Alice B. Weeks. 

3242. iv. Arthur Leon Child, b. Nov. 8, 1854. An artist. 

3243. v. Hattie Martha Child, b. Dec. 12, 1858, m. July 23, 1878, 
Walter Ford Hammond. 

3244. vi. Willie James Child, b. July 17. 1861, d. July 19, 1861. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3241. iii. Aldace Walker Child, eldest son and third 

child of Jonathan and Martha H. Walker Child, b. in Bath, 

X. H., Jan. 11, 1852, m. Sept. 7, 1875, Alice B. Weeks: reside 

in Grinnell, Iowa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3245. i. Clinton Centennial Child, b. July 4, 1876. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

2696. ix. Matilda Child, sixth dau. and ninth child of 
Richard and Abigail Green Child, b. Aug. 8, 1778, m. May 15, 
1798, David Weeks, who was b. July 14. 1774. Mr. David 



392 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Weeks d. June 11, 1842. Mrs. Matilda Child Weeks d. Oct 
3, 1847. The great grandchildren of this couple now number 
forty-seven. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 
3246 i. Laura Weeks, b. May 16, 1799, unmarried. 

3247. ii. John Child Weeks, b. Dee, 10, 1800, m. lst, c J)ec. 3, 1826, 
Maria Powers; m. 2d, Mch. 27, 1842, Ascenath Smith. 

3248. iii. Mary Child Weeks, b. Dec. 25, 1802, m. Sept, 27, 1826, 
Martin C. Powers. 

3249. iv. Dudley Child Weeks, b. Dec. 24, 1804, m. Aprir20, 1853, 
Lucy Topliff. 

3250. v. Alfred Weeks, b. Dec. 12, 1806, in. Jan. 2, 1835, Candace 
Porter. 

3251. vi. Jonathan Weeks, b. Dec, 2, 1808, in. Dec. 10, 1840, Betsey 
< hamberlain. 

3252. vii. Moses Merrison Weeks, b. Feb. 4, 1811, m. Dec. 29. 1840, 
Sally Minot. 

3253. viii. Willard Child Weeks, b. April 21, 1813, in. April 20, 1853, 
Lestine Merrill. 

3354. ix. Ezra Hutchins Weeks, b. July 21. 1816, d. Sept. 1, 1846. 

3255. x. Emily Weeks, b. July 16, 1818, m. April 14, 1842, William 
Minot. 

3256. xi. Eliza Weeks, b. April 10, 1«21, m. Dec 29, 1840, George 
Chamberlain. 

| Sixth Generation.] 

3247. ii. John Child Weeks, eldest son and second child 
of Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. in New Hampshire, 
Dec. 10, 1800, twice married — 1st, Dec. 3, 1826, Maria Powers; 
m. 2d, Mch. 27, 1842, Ascenath Smith. Mr. John C. Weeks 
d. June 23, 1874. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children. 

3257. i. Mary P. Weeks, b. Mch. 3, 1843. 

3258. ii. Charles Augustus Weeks, b. May 7, 1831, d. Feb. 1. 1862. 

3259. iii. Luella Weeks, b. Feb. 8, 1834, d. Feb. 1, 1867. 

3260. iv. David Weeks, b. Jan. 5, 1836. 

3261. v. Luvia Lang Weeks, b. March 12, 1840. 

3262. vi. Maria Weeks, b. April 9, 1842. 

. 3263. vii. Franklin Weeks, b. July 1, 1843. 

3264. viii. Ellen Frances Weeks, b. July 11, 1847, d. Dec. 30, 1862. 

3265. ix. Isaac Smith Weeks, b. April 15, 1856. 

3266. x. Moses W. Weeks, b. Dec. 28, 1858. 

3267. xi. Harry Eugene Weeks, b. Nov. 5, 1863. 

[Sixth Generation] 

3218. iii. Mary Child Weeks, second dau. and third child 
of Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. Dec. 25, 1802, doubtless 
considered the most perfect Christmas gift ever bestowed upon 



\M» HIS DESCENDANTS. 393 

her parents. Man Child Weeks m. Martin C. Powers, Sept. 

27, 1826. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3268. i. Charles Powers, b. Aug. 20, 1828. 

3269. ii. Laura W. Powers, b. Aug. :!0, 1831. 

3270. iii. John M \k«ts Powers, b. Oct. 18, 1834. 

3271. iv. Walter Powers, b. July 19. 1836. 

3272. v. Martha Ellen Powers, b. Nov. 15, 1837. 

3273. \i. Maria W. Powers, b. Dec. 29, 1859, d. June 15, 1870 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3249. iv. Dudley Child Weeks, second son and fourth 
child of Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. Dee. 24, 1804, m. 
April 20, 1853. Lucy Toplift 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3274. i. Horace Weeks, b. Nov. 17, 1832. 

3275. ii Adaline Weeks, b. Oct. 15, 1834. 

3276. iii. Annette Weeks, b. Sept. 29, 1836. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3250. v. Alfred Weeks, third son and fifth child of Ma- 
tilda Child and David Weeks, b. Dec. 12, 1806, in. Jan. 2, 

1838, Candace Porter. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3277. i. Lucia P. Weeks, b. Jan. 23, 1841. 

3278. ii. Willard H. Weeks, b. Jan. 26, 1844. 

Sixth Generation.] 

3251. vi. Jonathan Weeks, fourth son and sixth child of 
Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. Dec. 2, 1808, m. Dec. 10, 
1840, Betsey Chamberlain. Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Weeks 
died within a few days of each other, in June, 1878 ; Mr. Weeks 
the 18th, Mrs. Weeks the 14th, of the month. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

3279. i. Elizabeth C. Weeks, b. Sept. 1, 1842. 

3280. ii. Jane C. Weeks, b. Oct. 10, 1844. 

3281. iii. Alice B. Weeks, b. July 7, 1848. 

3282. iv. Emily M. W t eeks, b. Feb. 10, 1853. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3252. vii. Moses Merrjson Weeks, fifth son and seventh 

child of Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. Feb. 4, 1811, m. 

Dec. 29, 1840, Sally Minot. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3283. i. Minot Weeks, b. Dec. 31, 1841. 

3284. ii. Harriet P. Weeks, b. Oct. 6, 1844. 

3285. iii. Wilmot Weeks, b. June 37, 1848. 

3286. iv. Elbridge Weeks, b. Feb. 4, 1851. 
l)i 



394 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3253. viii. Willard Child Weeks, sixth son and eighth 
child of Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. April 21, 1813 
m. April 20. 1S53, Lestine Merrill. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

3287. i. Ezra Eugene Weeks, b. July 31, 1854. 

3288. ii. Lowell Mason Weeks, b. Aug. 7, 1857. 

3289. iii. Nellie Weeks, b. Aug. 10, 1859. 

3290. iv. Effie Weeks, b. Oct. 30, 1861. 

3291. v. Clara Etta Weeks, b. June 28, 1863. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

3255. x. Emily Weeks, third dan. and tenth child of 
Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. Julv 16, 1818, ra April 
14, 1842, William Mi not. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

3292. i. Eliza Minot, b. May 15, 1843. 

3293. ii. Marian B. Minot, b. May 3, 1850. 

3294. iii. Martha W. Minot, b. Nov. :j. l«53. 

3295. iv. Jonas Minot, b. May 22, 1857. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

3256. xi. Eliza Weeks, fourth dau. and eleventh child of 
Matilda Child and David Weeks, b. April 10, 1821. m. Dec. 
29, 1840, George Chamberlain. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3296. i. Willard W. Chamberlain, b. May 30, 1842. 

3297. ii. Edwin Chamberlain, b. Jan. 27, 1844. 

3298. iii. Samuel N. Chamberlain, b. April 4, 1855. 

3299. iv. Jennette Chamberlain, b. July 2, 1858. 

3300. v. Emilie M. Chamberlain, b. Aug. 2i, 1860. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

2485. viii. Eleazer Child, fourth son and eighth child of 
Capt. Penuel and Dorothy Dwight Child, b. in Thompson, Ct., 
Oct. 2, 1737, m. though to whom not yet ascertained. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

3301. i. Sabra Child, bapt. May 18. 1763, m. Dec. 21, 178-, Ebenezer 
Carroll, of Killingly, Ct. 

3302. ii. Thankful Child, bapt. May 18, 1763. 

3303. iii. Dorothy Child, bapt. Nov. 24, 1765. 

3304. iv. Elizabeth Child, bapt. Nov. 24, 1765. 

[Third Generation.] 

25. xi. Dea.. Thomas Child, eleventh child and eighth son 
of Benjamin and Grace Morris Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., 
Nov. 10, 1703, m. by John Chandler, Esq., Nov. 24, 1729, 
Anna Morris, dau. of Dea. Edward Morris. He was one of 
seven brothers who emigrated from Roxbury to Woodstock ; 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 395 

and was one of the early deacons in the Congregational church 

of Woodstock, Ct. He d. July 19, 1702. aged 59. She d. Aug. 

11, 1806, in her 95th year. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children: All born in Woodstock. 

3305. i. Milthea Child, b. Aug. 12, 1730, bapt. Aug. 20, d. Aug. 26, 1730. 

3306. ii. Margaret Child, b. July 28, 1731, bapt. Aug. 29. 1731, d. July 
26. 1742. 4 

3307. iii. Sybil Child, b. Men. 3, 1733, ra. Mch. 15, 1750, Edward Ains- 
worth. 

3308. iv. Anna Child, b. Aug. 17, 1734, bapt. Aug. IS. 1734. 

' 3309. v. Alithea Child, b. Aug. 4, 1736, m. Nov. 19, 1761, Thos. Peake. 

3310. vi. William Child, b. May 15, 1738, bapt. July 4, 1738, d. Feb. 6, 
1752. 

3311. vii. Dorothy Child, b. April 3, 1740. in. 1st, Oct. 23, 1763, Solomon 
Atherton; m. 2d, Feb. 26. 1766, Joshua Child. 

3312. viii. Lois Child, b. June 18, 1742, in. Nov. 17, 1768, Joseph May. 

3313. ix. Thomas Child, Jr„b. July 15, 1744, rn. Jan. 26, 1775, Lucy Gage. 

3314. x. Lemuel Child, b. July 12, 1747. m. Nov. 16, 1768, Dorcas Perry. 

3315. xi. Huldah Child, b. Nov. 19, 174!). ra. April 28. 1769. Stephen 
Skinner. 

3316. xii. William Child, 2d, b. Dec. 4, 1752. m. Dec. 29, 1784, Susannah 
Corbin. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3313. ix. Thomas Child, Jr., ninth child and second son 

of Dea. Thomas and Anna Morris Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct.. 

July 15. 174-1. m. Jan. 26, 1775, Lucy Gage. She d. Feb. 3, 

1795. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children : 

3317. i. Walter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 15, 1776. 

3318. ii. Anna Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 1, 177S. 

3319. iii. Asa Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept, 17, 1780. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3314. x. Lemuel Child, tenth child and third son of Dea. 
Thomas and Anna Morris Child, b July 12. 1747, m. Nov. 16. 
1768, Dorcas Perry. She was b. Dec. 22, 1741. d. Mch. 26, 
1825. He d. May 6, 1808. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

3320. i. Huldah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 19, 1769, d. Feb. 27, 
1855, unmarried. 

3321. ii. Thomas Perry Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct.. Dec. 20. 1770, d. 
Nov. 27, 1773. 

3322. iii. Stephen Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 24, 1772, d. Oct. 
19. 1783. 

3323. iv. Rowena Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Dec. 3, 1775, m. Nov. 26, 
1795. Alba Abbott. 

3324. v. Nancy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., May 20, 1778, m. Jan. 7, 
1799. Willard Abbott. 

3325. vi. Perry Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 6, 1780. 

3326. vii. Dolphus Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Mch. 25, 1785. m. Dec. 
1, 1808, Chloe Jackson. 



396 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBURY. MASS. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3326. vii. Dolphus Child,* seventh child and fourth son of 
Lemuel and Dorcas Perry Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Mch. 
25, 1785, m. Dec. 1. 1808, Chloe Jackson. He d..Mch. 1867. 
She d. Feb. 18, 1869, near Clymer, Chautauqua Co., K Y. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children : 

3327. i. Justus Childs, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Sept. 21, 1809. in. Sept. 21. 
1834, Betsey Budlong. 

3328. ii. Nancy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 27, 1813, m. A. H. 
Palmer. 

3329. iii. Lemuel Morris Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 7, 1816, m. 
Amy Colgrove. 

3330. iv. Thomas Perry Childs, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 8, 1817, m. 
Altezera E. Eaton. 

3331. v. Rowena Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 16, 1822, m. 
William Burnett. 

3332. vi.. Mary Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 16,1824, m. Samuel Cooley. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

3327. i. Justus Childs. eldest child of Dolphus and Chloe 
Jackson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Sept. 21, 1809, m. Sept, 
21, 1834, Betsey Budlong, dau. of Joseph Budlong, Esq., of 
Bridgewater, N. Y., a wealthy and influential farmer in that 
town. Mrs. Justus Childs was b. in Paris, Oneida Co., N. Y., 
Jan. 31, 1815. Mr. Childs d. May 24, 1868. 

Mr. Justus Childs commenced active life as a farmer in the 
town of Paris, Oneida Co., N. Y., which occupation he success- 
fully followed for a number of years, when from his accumula- 
tions he established himself in the manufacture of agricultural 
implements, in the city of Utica, N. Y. The business grew on 
his hands to large proportions, taxing his energies to an extent 
which seriously impared his health. In the prime of manhood 
and amid business activities, he fell into a decline which term- 
inated his useful life. Mr. Childs was a man highly esteemed 
for his integrity, generosity and business talent. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3333. i. Sarah Louisa Childs. b. in Bridgewater. X. Y., Nov. 18, 1835, 
m. Alexander B Roberts of Utica, d. Oct. 20, 1870 

3334. ii Joseph Morris Childs, b. in Bridgewater, N. Y., April 17. 
1840, m. Sept, 1, 1864, Cora Brown. 

3335. iii. Wallace Budlong Childs, b. in Bridgewater, N. Y., July 8, 
1842. Graduated at Hamilton College, Clinton, Oneida Co., X. Y., in the 
Class of 1864: studied law and entered upon his profession. M. Sept. 15, 
1869, Kate C. Van Buren of Dunkirk, X. Y., d. in Utica. X. Y., in 1870. 

:j:;:}6. iv. Orlaxdo Justus Childs, b. in Bridgewater, X. Y., July 25, 
1844, m. Dec. 10. 1874, Ella A. Jones. 

3337. v. Kate Elizabeth Childs, b. in Bridgewater, X. Y., Julv 10, 
1848, m. April 13, 1872. Charles G. Bamber. 

3338. vi. Charles Henry Childs, b. in Bridgewater, X. Y., Dee. 26, 1854. 
* Two sons of Dolphus Child have added the '" s " to their name. 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 397 

| Seventh Generation. | 

3334. ii. Joseph Morris Childs, second child and eldest 
son of Justus and Betsey Budlong Childs, b. in Bridgewater, 
N. Y., April 17, 1840, m. Sept. 1, 1864, Cor;. Brown, dau. of 
Charles Brown of CJnadilla Forks, Otsego Co., N. Y. The 
eldest sons of Mr. Justus Childs, J. Morris and Orlando J., 
were the immediate successors of their father. The business 
of this house has been successfully carried on Eor a number of 
years in the hands of these brothers, who are men of integrity 
and thorough business habits. A recent change in the firm, 
by the withdrawal of Mr. O. J. Childs, leaves the business in 
the management of J. Morris Childs and his younger brother 
Charles H. Childs, as junior partner. The firm is known as 
extensive wholesale dealers in agricultural implements, con- 
ducting a lucrative business on Fayette street, Utica, N. Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3339. i. Walter B. Childs, b. in Utica, Sept, 18, 1807. 

3340. ii. Fannie M. Childs, b. in Utica, June 28, 1872. 
[Seventh Generation.] 

3336. iv. Orlando J. Childs, fourth child and third son of 
Justus and Betsey Budlong Childs, b. in Bridgewater, N. Y., 
July 25, 1844, m. Dec. 10, 1874, Ella A. Jones, dau. of Jona- 
than Jones of Utica, N. Y. Mr. O. J. Childs withdrew from 
the old firm as before stated, to enter into new business rela- 
tions, and formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Frank 
Jones, under the firm name of Childs & Jones, in Utica, N. Y. 
They are extensive dealers in dairy apparatus and general hard- 
ware, extending their trade to the southern states. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3341. i. Wallace J. Childs, b. in Utica, Oct. 5, 1875. 
[Seventh Generation.] 

3337. v. Kate Elizabeth Childs, fifth child and second 
dau. of Justus and Betsey Budlong Childs, b. in Bridgewater, 
N. Y, July 10, 1848, m. April 13, 1872, Charles G. Bamber : 
residence Lockport, N. Y. 

| Eighth Generation.] Children : 

3342. i. Gertrude Bamber, b. April 17, 1875. 

3343. ii. William Bamber, b. Sept. 29, 1876. 
3343a iii. Bessie Bamber, b. 1879. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3328. ii. Nancy Child, second child and eldest dau. of 
Dolphus and Chloe Jackson Child, b. Aug. 27, 1813, m. Sept; 
28, 1834, A. H. Palmer: reside in Sandwich, 111. 



398 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3344. i. Oscar B. Palmer, b. Aug. 20, 1835. 

3345. ii. Morris Al. Palmer, b. Jan. 24, 1837. 

3346. iii. Camillus J. Palmer, b. Aug. 24, 1838, d. Feb. 24. 1839. 

3347. iv. Clinton R. Palmer, b. Dec. 13. 1839. 

3348. v. Camillus M. Palmer, 2d. b. Aug. 16, 1841. d. Jan. 12, 1863. 

3349. vi. James B. Palmer, b. Dec. 9, 1842. d. May 1, 1847. 

3350. vii. Frances Palmer, b. Oct. 18. 1844, d. Sept. 19. 1845. 

3351. viii. Frances Palmer, 2d, b. June 9, 1846. 

3352. ix Clara Palmer, b. Xov. 5, 1848. 

3353. x. MaryE. Palmer, b. May 20, 1851. 

3354. xi. Isadora Palmer, b. Dec. 21, 1854. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3329. iii. Lemuel Morris Child, third child and second 
son of Dolphus and Chloe Jackson Chiid, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct., Feb. 7, 1816, m. Amy Colgrove, then of Clymer, N. Y. 
He removed to Baxter Springs, Cherokee Co., Kansas, and d. 
there Aug. 9, 1878. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3355. i. Justus Child: lives at Parker's Landing. Pa. 

3356. ii. Frank Child: lives at Baxter Springs, Kansas. 
[Sixth Generation J 

3330. iv. Eev. Thomas Perry Childs, fourth child and 
third son of Dolphus and Chloe Jackson Child, b. in Wood- 
stock, Ct., Jan. S, 1817, m. Sept. 21, 1810, at Troy, Ohio, 
Altezera E. Eaton, dau. of Rev. Zelva Eaton. Mr. Childs is a 
clergyman of the Baptist denomination. He is extensively 
and favorably known as the discoverer of a catarrh remedy 
called i; Childs' Catarrh Specific." Much success seems to 
have attended his efforts in this direction, as would be indi- 
cated bv the numerous flattering testimonials which have been 
published from those who have been benefitted by its use ; re- 
sides in Troy, Ohio. 

[Seventh Generation. J Children: 

3357. i. Almira Childs, b. July 22.. 1841, m. Nov. 23, 1865, Dr. J. H. Green. 

3358. ii. Abbott Eaton Childs, b Aug. 29, 1845. m. Olive A. Shilling. 

3359. iii. Edwin Douglass Childs. 1,. May 15, 1850, d. Aug. 30, 1850. 

3360. iv. Mary Esther Childs, b. Aug. 18, 1852, m. Dec. 25, 1873, 
Albert D. Kniek. 

3361. v. Altezkra Childs, b. June 28, 1856, d. Aug. 21, 1856 

3362. vi. Clara Childs, \ ~ / b. July 22. 1S58. d. July 28, 1858. 

3363. vii Calla Childs. '/ B \ b. July 22, 1858, d. Oct. 23, 1858. 

3364. viii. Frank Perry Childs. b. Aug. 26, 1860. 
[Seventh Generation.] 

3357. i. Almira Childs, eldest child of Rev. Thos. Perry 
and Altezera E. Eaton Childs, b. Jan. 22, 1811, m. Nov. 23 ? 
18tf5. Dr. J. H. Green. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 399 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 
3465. i. Anna Mary Green, b. Jan. 19, 1871. 

[Seventh Generation J 

3358. ii. Abbott Eaton Childs, second child and eldest 

son of Rev. Thos. Perry and Altezera E. Eaton Childs, 1> 

Aug. 29, 1845, in. May 11, 1875, Olive A. Shilling; reside in 

Troy, Ohio. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3366. i. Thomas Maxwell Childs, 1>. Deo. 30, 1877. 

[ Seventh Generation.] 

3360. iv. Mary Esther Childs, fourth child and second 
dan. of Rev. Thos. Perry and Altezera E. Eaton Childs, b. 
Aug. 18, 1852, m. Dec 25, 1873, Albert Dye Knick ; resi- 
dence Troy, Ohio. 
[Eighth Generation ] child: 

3367. i. Albert Dye Knick, Jh., b. Dee. 6. 1875. v 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3331. v. Rowena Child, fifth child and second dau. of 
Dolphus and Chloe Jackson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Aug. 
16, 1822, m. Mch. 10, 184-1, William Bennett, b. Feb. 18, 1821, 

d. Oct. 15, 1853. 
[Seventh Generation.] Child : 

3368. i. M. Ledru Rollin Bennett, b. Aug 19, 1846, m May 12, 1867, 
Dora Lamora Rogs; she was b. Aug. 20, 1846. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3332. vi. Mary Child, sixth child and third dau. of Dol- 
phus and Chloe Jackson Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, July 16, 
1824, m. Nov. 1, 1859, Samuel 1. Cooley, son of Job M. and 
Eugenie Cooley. He was b. in Pharsalia, Chenango Co., N. Y., 
March 6, 1831. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3369. i. Dolphus Job Cooley, b. Sept. 6. 1861. 

3370. ii. Carroll Abbott Cooley, b. July 28. 1863. 

3371. iii. Clarence Dana Cooley, b. July 30, 1865. 

3372. iv. Chloe Eugenie Cooley, b. Jan. 3. 1869. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3316. xii. William Child, 2d, twelveth child and fourth 
son of Dea. Thomas and Anna Morris Child, b. in Woodstock, 
Ct, Dec. 4, 1752, m. Dec. 29, 1780, Susannah Corbin. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

3373. i. Lillie Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 16, 1781. 

3374. ii. Abigail Lillie Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., March 23, 1786. 



CHAPTER VI. 

JOSHUA CHILD. 

The reader who has become familiar with the name of Mr. 
Isaac Child of Boston, who gathered much of the early statistics 
embodied in this work, will observe his descent from Benjamin 
the emigrant, through the Joshua Child who heads this Chap- 
ter. 
[Second Generation.] 

5. iii. Joshua Child, third child and son of Benjamin 
Child, the emigrant, b. in Roxbury, Mass., 1658. We learn the 
"Apostle Elliot" laid upon his head the consecrating waters of 
baptism, giving to him the name Joshua, on the 20th of June, 
1658 ; at the same time, in like manner enfolding the elder sons 
Ephraim and Benjamin. The happy union of his brother Ben- 
jamin with Grace Morris, brought Joshua into pleasant friend- 
ship with the Morris family, and resulted in his alliance May 9, 
1685, with Elizabeth Morris, a sister of Grace, she was born March 
26, 1666. A memorandum upon a legal paper belonging to 
Mr. Benjamin Child, signed by Mr. Joshua Child, states that 
he had received his full part of the estate of his late father 
some time before ; bestowed upon him doubtless b} r his father 
at the time of his marriage, with a view to his comfortable 
establishment in life. Mr. Joshua Child made his home a short 
distance west of the old homestead in the now pleasant village 
of Brookline, Mass. Here generation after generation of the 
family lived and died for nearly two hundred years. Mr. 
Joshua Child was a man much respected, and held numerous 
offices of importance and honor in this town up to the time of 
his decease. His health became much irnpared, and entire 
loss of sight shadowed his latter days, so that his death on the 
18th of January, 1720, was unto him indeed an entrance into 
light. The full patriarchal number of children graced this 
home, though not all of the twelve grew to maturity. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Morris Child died March 6, 1754, aged 88. 
[Third Generation.] Children: 

3375. i. Joshua Child, Jr.. b. June 20, 1687, m. Sept. 6, 1715, Deborah 
Weld. 

3376. ii. Isaac Child, b. Dec. 20, 1688, m. 1st, 1713, Sarah Newell: m. 
2d, 1716, Elizabeth Weld. 



AM) HIS DESCENDANTS. I'M 

3377. iii. Elizabeth Child, b. July 20, 1691, in. Dec 18, 1711, John 
May of Roxbury, who removed to Woodstock, Ct. 

3378. iv. Mehitable Child, b. Oct. '37. 1693. 

3379. v. JosEPn Child, b. Jan. 7. 1696, m. Nov. 29, 1722,Abigail Bridges. 

3380. vi. Abigail Child, b. Men. 15, 1698, m. Nov. 12, 1719, Jas. Draper. 

3381. vii. Ann Child, b. April 8, 1700. in. Joshua Murdock, of Newton. 

M.'ISS. 

3382. viii. Dorothy Child, b. May 5, 1701, m. May 2. 1723. Ebenezer 
Draper. 

3383. ix. Prudence Child, 1». July 22, 1703. 

3384. x. Samuel Child, b. Nov. 7, 1705, d. young. 

3385. xi. Samuel Child, 2d, b. Feb. 4, 1707. 

3386. xii Caleb Child, b. Sept. 1(5. 1709, in. Oct, 19, 1728. Rebecca Dana. 

[Third Generation.] 

3375. i. Joshua Child, Jr., eldest child of Joshua and Eliza- 
beth Morris Child, b. June 20, 1687, m. Sept. 6, 1715, Deborah 

Weld. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

3387. i. Ahi.iah Child, b. Feb. 24, 1717, d. Dec. 3. 1719. 

3388. ii. Mary Child, b. Dec, 24, 1718, d.Dee. 21, 171 ( J. 

3389. iii. Abi.iah Child, 2d. b. Nov. 21, 1720, d. young. 

3390. iv. Joshua Child. Jr.. b. April 21, 1722, d. young. 

3391. v. Joshua Child. 2d, b. April 22. 172(5. 

[Third Generation.] 

3376. ii. Isaac Child, second child of Joshua and Elizabeth 
Morris Child, b. Dec. 20, 1688, m. 1st. 1713, Sarah Newell : m. 
2d, 1716, Elizabeth Weld. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children. By Sarah Newell : 

3392. i. Sarah Child, b. April 11, 1715, in. Ezra Davis, of Roxbury. 
Mass. 

By Elizabeth Weld : 

3393. ii. Isaac Child, Jr., b. April 30, 1717, in Brookline, Mass., d. yg. 

3394. iii. Elizabeth Child, b. June 12, 1718, in Brookline, Mass., in. 
June 15, 1738, John Payson. 

3395. iv. Esther Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Feb. 17, 1720, d. youn^. 

3396. v. Isaac Child, 2d, b. in Brookline, Mass., Mav 1, 1722, m. Dec. 
12, 1745, Elizabeth Weld. 

3397. vi. Esther Child, 2d, b. in Brookline, Mass, Nov. 14, 1724. m. 
Josiah Murdock. of Newton. He d. May 23, 1794. 

3398. vii. Abigail Child, b. in Brookline. Mass., April 15, 1727. 

3399. viii. Anna Child, b. in Brookline. Mass., April 24, 1730. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3396. v. Isaac Child, Jr., fifth child of Isaac and Elizabeth 
Weld Child, b. May 1, 1722, m. Dec. 12, 1745. Elizabeth Weld. 
He d. May 23, 1794. 
[Fifth Generation. J Children: 

3400. i. David Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Nov. 2, 1740. d. Oct. 16. 
1766. 



402 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

.3401. ii. Abi.iah Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Dec 7, 1748, m. Lois 
Davis, of Roxbury. She was b. Oct. 9, 1748, d. July 24, 1830. 

3402. iii. Mary Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., May 2, 1750. in. Daniel 
White, of Brookline. 

3303. iv. Abigail Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Feb. 5, 1752, in. John 
Colburn, of Sturbridge, Mass. 

3404. v. Daniel Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Feb. 19. 1754, in. Oct. 
29, 1781, Rebecca Richards. 

3405. vi. Elizabeth Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Feb 8. 1756, d yg. 

3406. vii. Elizabeth Child, 2d, b. in Brookline, Mass., July 23. 1758, 
d. young. 

3407. viii. Sarah Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass , May 1, 1760, d. young 

3408. ix. Ann Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Jan. 11, 1761, d. young. 

3409. x. Isaac Child, b. in Sturbridge. Mass., May 2, 1763, in. Esther 
Bardwell. 

3410. xi. Joseph Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass , Oct. 16, 1765. 

3411. xii. David Weld Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Feb. 19, 1772, 
ra. April, 1801, Abigail Dorr. dau. of Ebenezer Dorr, merchant. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3401. ii. Abuah Child, second child of Isaac and Elizabeth. 
Weld Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Dec. 7, 1748, m abt. 1777, 
Lois Davis, of Roxbury, who was b. Oct. 25, 1749, d. May 1, 
1S24. Mr. Abijah Child first settled in Roxbury, Mass., and 

thence removed to Sturbridge, Mass. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3412. i. Mary Child, b. July 5, 1778, ra. Peres Walker, of Sturbridge, 
Mass. 

3413. ii. William Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., April 15. 1780, unm. 

3414. iii. Sarah Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Mch. 1, 1782, m. Lyman 
Morse, of Sturbridge, Mass. 

3415. iv. Amasa Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Mch. 21, 1784, m. Dec. 
1, 1808. Cynthia Freeman, dau. of Comfort Freeman. She was b. Oct. 9, 
1784, d. July 9, 1830. He d. Dec. 27, 1828. 

3416. v. Nancy Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass.. June 30, 1786, m. Lyman 
Johnson. 

[Sixth Generation] 

3412. i. Mary Child, eldest child of Abijah and Lois Davis 
Child, b. July 5, 1778, m. Perez Walker, of Sturbridge, Mass. 
[Seventh Genei'ation.J Children: 

3417. i. Louisa Walker, b. Feb. 23, 1800. 

3418. ii. Mary Walker, b. Oct. 28, 1804. 

3419. iii. Chester Walker, b. Oct. 28, 1802. 

3420. iv. Clorinda Walker, b. Mch. 26, 1809. 

» 
[Sixth Generation.] 

3413. ii. William Child, second child of Abijah and Lois 
Davis Child. Was a leading and successful merchant in Balti- 
more, Maryland. He was never married, but has left memorials 
in his successful and useful life, which his friends will be glad 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 4<>o 

to preserve in these records. The knowledge of the history of 
Mr. Child as a representative man of the branch to which he 
belonged, obtained from one of the line, will justify some 
pleasant inferences: 

It is a prominent feature in tin' characteristics thai distin- 
guish the family surname, that practical life partakes of the 
sober and robust cast, derived, from the age in which the Puri- 
tans lived, and gave complexion to the moral and social phases 
of society. The successes of life, though not remarkably 
striking, with few exceptions have grown out of the vitalizing 
and enduring elements, which underlie the structure of sub- 
stantial and prosperous communities. We find this happily 
illustrated in the brief history of Mr. William Child, second 
son of Mr. Abijah Child, of the 5th generation. His personal 
virtues were the basis of his active and useful life. They won 
for him the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens, and 
made him a benefactor to his race. His kinsmen may proudly 
cherish the memory of so worthy a representative of their lint'. 
The estimate in which he was held as a citizen of Baltimore 
may be seen in an article copied from the Baltimore American, 

on the occasion of his death February ii, 1S62. It says : 

"No citizen was more remarkable for his punctuality and uniformly 
regular deportment than the deceased, and his amiable and benevolent dis- 
position was well known and endeared him to a large circle of intimate 
friends. The regularity of his habits may well be judged of when we state 
that for forty-eight years he never failed to appear at his counting room 
before breakfast, and during that long period he was never once known to 
be absent from his pew in church. For the city of his adoption Mr. Child 
entertained the liveliesl feelings of affection and regard; and when the in- 
vasion by the British took place, in 1814, he stood manfully in its defence in 
Fnrt McHenry. Cherishing warmly the principles of christian philanthropy 
he shaped the whole action of his life by the golden rule of 'doing unto 
others as he would be done by.' " 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3414. iii. Sarah Child, third child of Abijah and Lois 
Davis Child, b. Mch. 1. 1782, m. Lyman Morse of Sturbridge, 
Mass. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3421. i. William Child Morse, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Feb. 23, 1805. 

3422. ii. Julia Morse, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., March 29, 1809. 

3423. iii. Samuel Morse. 

3424. iv. Lyman Morse, Jr., d. 1858. 

3425. v. Sarah Morse, d. 1863. 



404 BENJAMIN CHILI) OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3415. iv. Capt. Amasa Child, fourth child and second son 
of Abijah and Lois Davis Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Mcli. 
21, 1784, m. Dec. 1, 1808, Cynthia Freeman, dau. of Comfort 
Freeman of Sturbridge. Of the substantial men of the period 
Mr. Child ranked among the most popular of his fellow towns- 
men for intelligence, sturdy principles and general prosperity. 
As a tiller of the soil he was prosperous, and successful in 
securing the means for a comfortable independence for himself 
and family. As a patriot he gave to his country willing and 
unconstrained service at the time of the British invasion of 

1812. In this war he held a captain's commission and served 
to its close, when he was honorably discharged to serve his 
country in a civil capacity. His public services, as a represen- 
tative from the town of Sturbridge, for a term of }^ears in suc- 
cession in the Massachusetts Legislature, are proofs of the 
confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. He died 
in mature manhood, bequeathing to a large family of interest- 
ing sons and daughters the virtues of a worthy father. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

3426. i. Alphonso Child, b. in Sturbridge. Mass, Sept. 10. 1809, d. 
Aug. 28 1830. 

3427. ii. Amanda Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass , Nov. 15, 1811, rn. May 
4, 1831, Fitzhugh Morse. 

3428. iii. Cynthia Freeman. Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Sept, 15, 

1813, m. Oct. 6, 183G, Howard Uphani. 

3429. iv. Abijah Child, I), in Sturbridge. Mass., Dec. 8, 1815, m. Sept. 
24, 1840, Hannah Uphani. 

3430. v. Anna Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass.. March 30, 1819. 

3431. vi. Addison Child, b. in Sturbridge. Mass., Jan. 30, 1821, m. 
Abbie Cunningham Child. 

3432. vii. Adaline Sophia Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., March 19, 
1823, m. May 10, 1855, Henry Porter. 

3433. viii Clakinda Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Oct, 25, 1826, d. 
Feb. 3, 1827. 

3434. ix. Amasa Davis Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., July 21, 1828, 
d. July 14, 1829. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3427. ii. Amanda Child, eldest dau. and second child of 
Amasa and Cynthia Freeman Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., 
Nov. 15, 1811, m. May 4, 1831. Fitzhugh Morse: she d. April 

17, 1867. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3435. i. Henry Alphonso Morse, b. March 27. 1832, m. Sept. 29, 1S57, 
Joey D. Cunningham. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 4<>5 

3436. ii. Amasa Child MoKSE, b. Oct. 24. 1833, m. L858, Mary Ann 
Southwick. 

3-137. iii. Fitz Albert MORSE, b. May 25, 1839, in. May. 1875, Helen D. 
Cnlting. 

3438. iv. Ellen Eugenia Morse, b Oct. 20, 1844. m. Sept. 29. 1*70, 
Rev. Richard Metcalf. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3435. i. Henry Alphonso Morse, eldesl child of Amanda 
Child and Fitzhugh Morse, b. Mch. 27. 1832. m. Sept. 29, 
1857. Joey D. Cunningham. 

[Ninth Generation] Children: 

3439. i. Ruth Mouse, b. 1858. 

3440. ii. Abba Child Morse, b. 1861. 

3441. iii. Gertrude Morse, b. 1864. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

343B. ii. Amasa Child Morse, second child and son of 

Amanda Child and Fitzhugh Morse, b. Oct. 24. 1833, m. 1858, 

Mary Ann Southwick. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 
3442 i. William Child Morse, b. 1859. 

3443. ii. Anna Southwick Morse, b. 1860. 

3444. iii. Edna Southwick Morse, b. 1862. 

3445. iv. Henry Alphonso Morse, b. 1870. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3437. iii. Fitz Albert Morse, third child and son of 
Amanda Child and Fitzhugh Morse, b. May 25, 1839. m. May, 
1875, Helen D. Colting. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3446. i. Robert Cunningham Morse, b. 1877. 

3447. ii. Albert Child Morse, b. 1878. 

[Seventh Generation ] 

.'.428. iii. Cynthia Freeman Child, third child and second 
dan. of Amasa and Cynthia Freeman Child, b. Sept, 15, 1813, 
m. Oct, 6, 1836, Howard Upham; she d. 1873. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3448. i. Lucius Everett Upham, b. 1838, in. 1858, Emily Dorman. 

3449. ii. Addison Child Upham, 1). 1842. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

342'J. iv. Abi.iah Child, fourth child and second son of 
Amasa and Cyithia Freeman Child, b. in Sturbridge. Mass.. 
Dec. 8, 1815. m. Sept. 24. 1840, Hannah Upham ; he d. Dec. 

11, 1875. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children : 

3450. i. Alphonso Freeman Child. 1>. 1841, d. Aug.20, 1864. a prisoner 
of war at Andersonville 



406 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

3451. ii. Florence C. Child, b. 1845, m. William . 

3452. iii. William Child, b. 1846. 

3453. iv. Ada Lois Child, b. 1848. 

3454. v. Hannah Clara Child, b. 1850, in. Clarence Shumway. 

[Seventh Generation] 

3430. v. Anna Child, third dau. and fifth child of Amasa 
and Cynthia Freeman Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Mch. 30, 
1S19. She was a teacher of pleasant memory, in Virginia and 
California ; she died in the latter State Aug. 6, 1865, greatly 
respected and lamented, as well for her philanthropy as for her 
capacity as an instructor. The Boston Christian Register of 
September 3, 1865, pays the following deserved tribute to the 
memory of Miss Child : 

"The subject of this notice, Miss Anna Child, whose death we chronicle 
to-day, was a native of Sturbridge, Mass. She became early in life a teacher 
in the South, but living in the midst of slavery her views in regard to it 
became gradually so much at variance with those with whem she daily 
associated, that she found she must veil her sentiments, and sacrifice either 
her personal feelings or her sphere of usefulness there. She chose the 
latter and returned to the North, although in so doing she parted with 
many warm and estimable personal friends there. After spending some 
years at home, she determined to seek a new and enlarged sphere of doing 
good, and went to California, in 1859, in the same steamer that carried out 
our lamented Star King and family. She opened a school for girls there, 
which she continued to the time of her last illness, oftentimes receving and 
instructing such as were unable to pay for it. She was a constant and sin- 
cere worshipper at the Unitarian church, and was an efficient and conscien- 
tious teacher in the Sunday-school, during Mr. King's ministry and since, 
and as Mr Stebbins writes, 'found her own happiness in making others 
happy.' Her funeral was in the Unitarian church, Aug. 7, attended by 
many members of the Sunday-school and a goodly number of those who 
had been attracted by her unselfish goodness. At the regular teachers' meet- 
ing, held Aug. 14th, the following preamble and resolutions were passed : 

'God in his infinite wisdom has removed one of our number by death. Miss 
Anna Child was for many years connected with this Sunday-school, and by 
her faithful and untiring service, her gentle disposition and unfailing love 
for the school, had won the esteem and affection of all who knew her. When 
we miss her from her sphere of duty, and wonder why one so useful should 
be so suddenly taken away; it is at least some consolatiou to believe that 
for her 'to die is gain," still it is becoming us to recognise our loss, and to 
tender our sympathy to her bereaved friends. Therefore, Resolved, That 
the Superintendent be instructed to convey to the friends and family of Miss 
Child our sense of her worth, and the loss we have sustained in her death, 
and offer our sympathy with them in their bereavement.' 

San Francisco, Cal , Aug. 14, 18(55. Samuel S. Cutter, 

Supt. Pilgrim Sunday School." 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3431. vi. Addison Child, third son and sixth child of 
Amasa and Cynthia Freeman Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 407 

Jan. 30, 1821, m. Abbie Cunningham Child, Jan. of Joshua 
and Lucretia Dorr Child, who was b. 1817, d. May 20, 187-1. 

Mr. Addison Child is a thorough Anglo-Saxon in personnel, 
six feet in height, symmetrical in figure, and of a line pres- 
ence. A goodlv inheritance of strong physical and mental 
qualities, have been developed and cultivated. The advantages 
of home and foreign travel have enlarged his powers, and in 
the refinement of cultured society lie finds his true home. Bis 
literary attainments are finely shown in the able articles over 
his signature in the earlier part of this book. Of the mercantile 
house of Lewis Audenraid & Co., Boston, Mass., he has made 
his financial success a means of enjoying the delights of genuine 
rural life, in St, Lawrence Co., New York, devoting time and 
means to the best development of a wooded, hilly township. 
Looking to the future, he has stocked the lakes and streams 
from the fish nurseries of Western New York. 

(Seventh Generation.] 

343a. vii. Adaline Sophia Child, fourth dan. and seventh 
child of Amasa and Cynthia Freeman Child, b. in Sturbridge, 
Mass., Mch. 19. 1823, m. May 16. 1S55. Henry Porter. 
[Eighth Generation] Child: 

3455. i. Theodoke Child Porter, b. 18G0. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3404. v. Daniel Child, fifth child and third son of Isaac 
and Elizabeth Weld Child, b. in Brookline. Mass., Feb. 19. 
1754, m. Oct 29, 1781, Rebecca Richards, who was b. Dec. 18, 
1760, d. May 10, 1826. He d. Oct. 2 7. 1S44. 
[Sixth Generation] Children: 

3456. i. Betsey Child b. in Brookline, Mass.. Jan. 24, 1772. m. May ■">, 
1803, Oliver Fisher, of Boston. He was b. Feb. 28, 1778. d. April 6, 1830. 
She d. Oct. 17, 1858. 

3457. ii. Richards Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Dec. 9, 1783, in. Oct. 4, 
1812. Elizabeth Richards. 

3458. iii. Joshua Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Dee. 28, 1785, m. Aug. 
5, 1815, Lucretia Dorr. 

3459 iv. John Richards Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., Aug. 28, 1788, 
in. in 1820, Hannah Richards. 

3460. v. Isaac Child, b. in Brookline, Mass. Mch. 15. 1791, d. April 4, 
1791. 

3461. vi. Isaac Child, 2d, b. in Newton, Mass.. May 1, 1792, in. 1st, Eliza 
Billings; m. 2d. Maria M. Eastman: m. 3d, Abigail Baker. 

3462. vii. Hannah Child, b. in Newton, Mass., Aug. 3, 1794, d. Feb. 27, 
1809. 

3463. viii. Catharine Richards Child, b. in Newton, Mass , Feb. 27, 
1797, d. Oct. 19, 1873, unmarried. 



408 BENJAMIN CHILD OF BOXBUKY, MASS. 

3464. ix. Julia Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., June 27, 1799, d. Sept. 25, 
1800. 

3465. x. David Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., July 15, 1801, d. in Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, 1840, unmarried. 

3466. xi. Daniel Franklin Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., Mav 16, 1803, 
m. Nov. 14, 1839, Mary Davis Guild. 

3467. xii. Hannah Child, 2d, b. Mch. 17, 1809, d. by drowning in a well. 
[Sixth Generation J 

3457. ii. Eichards Child, second child and eldest son of 
Daniel and Kebecca Eichards Child, b. in Brookline, Mass., 
Dec. 9, 1783, m. Oct. 4, 1812, Elizabeth Richards, dan. of Paul 
Dudley and Anna May Richards. She was b. Aug. 18, 1781, 
d. in Boston, Dec. 13, 1878. Mr. Child d. Nov. 28, 1840. 
The following obituary from the Boston Daily Journal of Mrs. 
Child will be read with interest: 

•'Death of a Remarkable Old Lady. — Mrs. Elizabeth Child, one of the 
oldest residents of Boston, died at her residence, No. 1 Hollis street, FridaW 
morning, at the age of 97 years, 3 months, 25 days. About one year ago 
she ceased to go down stairs, but she has been able to walk about her cham- 
bers until within three months. She did not take her bed until within a short 
time of her decease, and she possessed her faculties until the last. 

Mrs. Child was the daughter of Paul Dudley Richards, who died in 1832, 
at the age of 82 years, and was a descendant in a direct line of Thomas 
Dudley, one of the first Governors of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, the 
connecting links in the genealogical chain being Governor Joseph Dudley, 
Wilham Dudley, Elizabeth Dudley Richards and Paul Dudley Richards. 
She was born August 18. 1781, on Bennet street, near the corner of Wash- 
ington, her parents having but one other child, Joseph, who died in 1822. 
Marrying Mr. Richards Child, of this city, she had two children, both of 
whom she outlived. These children were Elizabeth, wife of the late Dr. Abel 
Ball (deceased in 1856), and Henry R Child (deceased in 1847). Her hus- 
l i.ind died in 1840. At the present time her nearest living relatives are her 
grandson, Mr. Dudley R. Child of this city, and several nephews and nieces. 
For many years she has lived in the old house at the corner of Hollis and 
Washington streets, which was built by her father in 1790, he having pur- 
chased the land soon after the great fire of 1787, paying therefor the 
sum of £160 She has always lived within 200 yards of this spot. Mrs. 
Child was a woman of much intelligence, and retained her mental faculties 
to the last, not only possessing vivid recollections of old-time events but 
taking an interest in current events which led her to keep fully informed 
concerning them. Her eyesight was remarkable, and she never was obliged 
to use glasses, but up to a few weeks before her death she read for herself 
the news of the time as given in the columns of The Daily Journal, to 
which she has been a constant subscriber since 1861, at which time she gave 
up the Courier on account of its secession proclivities, which did not accord 
with her old-fashioned " Whig " sentiments. She was a devout christian 
and a member of the Hollis Street Church, in which she owned a pew inherit- 
ed from her ancestors. She held pleasant memories of her former pastors, 



AND HIS DES< KM'ANTS. 409 

Rev. Mr. Wight, Rev. Samuel West, Rev. 1 1 « • rare Bolly, and others. 

Among her memories of general events was that of having seen Gen. Wash- 
ington on Orange street, now Washington street, when she was aboul twelve 
years of age In her charities Mrs. Child was unostentatious ami actuated 
by good judgment. Ber way of living was quiet ami her disposition peace- 
ful, ami to these facts, together with her possession of a sound constitution,. 
may be attributed the great length of her life. In some respects she was 
peculiar, never having been inside an omnibus horse-car or steam-car. Still 
-he has visited the White Mountains, the State of Maine, and various parts 
of this State. always traveling, however, in a carriage or stagecoach Given 
to industry throughout her life, she was able t>. sew and knit to within a 
short time of her death. Her last days have been comforted by the tender 
ministrations of her faithful companion, Miss Lydia Ball, who has resided 
with her over twenty-seven years. She was in many respects a very remark- 
able woman, and her decease removes one more of those who are living ties 
net ween the last century and the present '* 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3468. i. Elizabeth Child, b. in Boston. Mass , July 24, 1813, m. June 
24, 1845, Dr. Abel Ball, of Northborough. Mass.. son of Dr. Stephen Ball, of 
Northborough, Mass. He was b. in 1810. We are without the date of his 
death. The following brief notice is from the New England Historical and 
i" iwalogical Register : 

"Dr. Ball studied medicine with his father in Northborough Mass. He re- 
ceived the degree of M. D. from Bowdoin College in 1837, since which he 
has been in the practice of dentistry. He married Elizabeth R, Child. The 
■ hath of Dr. Ball was very sudden." He was on a visit to Philadelphia, and 
had attended the Centennial Exhibition during the day, and on his return 
to the Globe Hotel, he fell dead in the wash-room in the act of putting his 
hand to the water faucet. The canse of his death was disease of the heart. 

His relative and friend, Mr Isaac Child, says of him: "His reputation 
for skill in his profession was very high. He was truly a man whom to 
know was to love. He had a heart as tender as a child, and his sympathies 
were ever ready to flow out to every one who needed them. His amiable 
and affectionate nature bound his friends to him in the strongest ties, and 
deep and universal will be the mourning for his sudden and unexpected 
departure." He was admitted a member of the New England Histori- 
cal Genealogical Society in Nov. 4, 1865. 

3469. ii. Henry Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Julv 17, 1815. d. April 6. 
1816. 

3470. iii. Henry Child. '2d. b. in Boston, Mass., July 25, 1816, m. June 
24, 1S44. Sarah Shurtliff Freeman, dau. of Dr. Benjamin Shurtliff and 
widow of Benjamin Freeman. Mr. Child was a merchant in Hillsboro, 111. 
Mrs Child was b. in 1813. d. Aug. 8, 1876. 

[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3471. i. Dudley Richards Child, b. June 2, 1845, m. Oct. 13, 1866, 
Missouri Stockwell. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children of Dudley Richards and Missouri Child : 

3472. i. Dudley Richards Child, Jr., b. Sept. 16, 1867. 
:;473. ii. Edith Child, b. Sept. 27, 1870. 

::474. iii. Bessie Child, b. March 5, 1879. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3458. iii. Joshua Child, third child and second son of 
Daniel and Rebecca Richards Child, b. in Brookline, Mass. r 

K-i 



410 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

Bee. 28, 1785, m. Aug. o, 1816, Lucretia Dorr. dau. of Ebene- 
zer Dorr, of Boston ; she was b. June 19, 1781, d. Dec. 16, 1863. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children : 

3475. i. Abbie Cunningham Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Sept. 10, 1817, in. 
Addison Child, son of Amasa and Cynthia Freeman Child, d. May 24.* 1874. 

:J476. ii. Henry Dorr Child, b. , d. May 24 1874, in Florence, 

Italy, unmarried. It is considered a remarkable coincidence that Mr. 
Henry Dorr Child and his sister, Abbie Cunningham Child, wife of Mr. 
Addison Child, should have died about the same time though 3.000 or 4,000 
miles apart and in different countries. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3459. iv. John Richards Child, fourth child and third 
son of Daniel and Rebecca Richards Child, b. in Brookline, 
Mass., Aug. 28, 1788, m. 1820, Hannah Richards, dau. of 
Joshua and Deborah Davis Richards ; she was b. April 13, 
1797. Mr. Child removed to Cincinnati, O., where he was en- 
gaged for many years in a prosperous business. He was a 
man of large benevolence, esteemed for his manly and noble 
qualities ; he d. Aug. 24, 1866. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3477. i. Elizabeth Fisher Child, b. in Boston, Mass.. 1821, m. George 
Henry Davis ; lived in Cincinnati and New York City. 

3478. ii. John Richards Child, Jr., b. in Boston, Mass., Jan. 29, 1823, 
m. Frances Wood of Cincinnati. O. 

3479. iii. Caroline Frances Child, b. in Cincinnati, 0., Jan. 15. 1825, 
d. Sept, 27, 1826. 

3480. iv. Joshua Richards Child, b. in Cincinnati, 0.,Mav22, 1828, 
•d. March 30, 1829. 

3481. v. Richard E. Child, ) b. in Cincinnati, O.. Aug. 3, 1838, 

- Twins. [d. June 28, 1840. 

3482. vi. Warren Hartshorn Child. ) b. in Cincinnati, 0., Aug. 3, 1838, 
m. 1865, Molly Edmondston. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3477. i. Elizabeth Fisher Child, eldest child of John 
Richards and Hannah Richards Child, b. in Boston, Mass., 
1821, in. about 1845, George Henry Davis; they reside in New 
York City. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3483. i. Henry Davis, b. Jan. 8, 1847. 

3484. ii. Carlton C. Davis, b. June 18, 1848. m. Jan. 12, 1875, Julia 
Helen Force. 

3485. iii. Walter John Davis, b. May 18, 1860. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3484. ii. Carltox C Dayis. second child and son of Eliz- 
abeth Fisher Child and George Heniy Davis, b. in Cincinnati, 

* On page 407, the date of death of Mrs. Abbie Cunningham Child is given 
May 20, 1874. The discrepancy is owing to different dates in the record sent 
us— discovered too late to be remedied. 




fr 



&JMXSM.) ^Kvi^ 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 411 

O., June 18, 1848, m. Jan. 12, 1875, Julia Helen Force of 
Pittsburg, Pa.; she was b. in Pittsburg, Pa., Nov. 12, 1853. 
She is the dau. of William and Mary A. Force. Mr. Child 
resides in Denver, Col. 
[Ninth Generation.! Child: 

3486. i. Carlton Charles Davis, b. in Denver. Col., Nov. 26, 1876. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3478. ii. John Richards Child, second child and eidesl 
son of John Richards and Hannah Richards Child, b. in Boston, 
Mass., Jan. 29, 1823, m. about 1846, Frances Wood. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3487. i. William Wood Child, b. in Cincinnati, 0., Aug. 8, 1847. 

3488. ii. John Richards Child, Jr., b. in Cincinnati, 0.. Feb. 16, 1849. 

3489. iii. Hannah Frances Child, b. in Cincinnati, 0.. 1853. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3461. vi. Isaac Child, 2d, sixth child and fifth son of 
Daniel and Rebecca Richards Child, b. in Newton, Mass., May 
1, 1792, m. three times— 1st, Nov. 22. 1821, Eliza Billings, 
dau. of Benjamin and Susanna Weld Billings of Roxbury, 
Mass., she was b. 1798; m. 2d, July 4, 1848, Maria M. East-' 
man, dau of Phineas and Judith Gale Eastman of Franklin, 
N. H., she d. April 3, 1S53, and he m. 3d, May 31, 1854, 
Abigail Baker, dau. of Eli Forbes Baker, Esq., of Steuben. Me., 
she was b. Mch. 7, 1816. Mrs. Eliza Billings Child was in- 
tered at West Roxbury, Mass., and Mrs. Maria Eastman Child 
at Forest Hill Cemetery, Roxbury. 

Mr. Isaac Child by reason of his great age, eligible family 
connections, and many years of special devotion to genealogical 
research relating to our family name, is justly entitled to a 
pleasant notice in this connection. He was born in Roxbury, 
Mass., on the first of May, 1792, making his age at this date 
(Sept. 1, 1880,) 88 years and 4 months. One possessed of the 
physical and intellectual stamina, which it has been the for- 
tune of Mr. Child to inherit from a robust ancestry, could 
scarcely live to his age without an instructive history of much 
interest. We should look for intelligence and manliness, and 
all the best results of an industrious and virtuous life. The 
channel of Mr. Child's activities has brought him in contact 
with men of intelligence and culture, and enabled him to have 
memories which future generations will contemplate with no 
little interest. His early life was spent in mercantile pursuits 



412 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

either in his own interest or that of others, which was charac- 
terized by efficiency and entire uprightness. During these 
man} r years of business employments, his reading and observa- 
tion have been quite extensive, resulting in humane and benev- 
olent views of life, as well as in the adoption of opinions and 
theories on moral and religious questions, which have drawn 
him aside from the generally accepted current systems of the 
present day. Without detracting from his moral worth he 
might be regarded as somewhat eccentric. Whether his medi- 
umislic tendencies should be classed among his eccentricities 
we express no opinion. He claims, to quote his own lan- 
guage, " a foretaste of the future life as immediately connected 
w T ith the present, as fully exhibited by the whole character of 
Jesus .... overlooked or evaded by the christian world of 
the present times." We discover in this no very great ad- 
vance in christian experience over the rest of the christian 
world. And he adds : " Universal kindness, forgiveness, 
goodness, and unselfishness in every possible way are sure to 
• raise us toward God and a happy future." There can be no 
doubt that these attainments are the legitimate fruits of true 
faith in Christ, which is the common belief of the bulk of pro- 
fessing christians. His moral honesty cannot be questioned. 
The drift of his researches for many years have been in the 
direction of genealogical lore and antique curiosities. Speci- 
mens of the latter constitute an unclassified cabinet full of 
interest. Here one lives among the ancients. The lessons 
afforded are suggestive of instructive and amusing events. It 
would be folly to call some of the results of a long life thus 
displayed, a waste of time, and a proof of an aimless life — each 
man fills a sphere, no man lives in vain. His emanations are 
full of instructive lessons that should be used to make us wiser 
and better. In the line of genealogical investigations in behalf 
of our family name, Mr. Child has been indefatigable. While 
bodily infirmities are bowing his once noble form, his mental 
powers are still remarkable for vigor. His domestic felicities 
have been shared and enhanced by three successive compan- 
ions in holy wedlock, whose intelligence, amiability and moral 
worth have constituted no small part of his home comforts ; 
the last of whom still lives to sympathize with and care for 
his declining years. 



AND JUS DESCENDANTS.. 413 

|Seventh Generation.] Children of Isaac Child by 1st marriage: 

3490. i. Sophia Buckland Ciiild, b. in Boston, Mass.. Aug. 11, 1822, m. 
Sept. 15, 1842, James Guild', son of Samuel Guild, of Roxbury, Mass. She 
d. Dec. 2, 1857. They had no children. 

By second marriage : 

3491. ii. Susan Rebecca Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Sept. 21, 1855, d. 
Aug. 1858, at Steuben, Me. This was a remarkably mature child, and gave 
great promise for the future. 

3492. iii. Elizabeth Ball Child, b. June 1, 1858, d. July 30, I860. 
| Sixth Generation.] 

3466. xi. Daniel Franklin Child, eleventh child and 
seventh son of Daniel and Kebecca Richards Child, b. in Box- 
bury, Mass., May 10, 1803, m. Nov. 4, 1839, Mary Davis Guild, 
dau. of Samuel and Mary Mears Guild. She was b. Dec. 23, 
1807, d. Jan. 25, 1861. He d. suddenly Oct. 18, 1876. 

Mr. Daniel F. Child is so thoroughly presented in the obit- 
uary notices of him in three of the leading papers of Boston, 
the Commonivealth, Transcript and Advertiser, that we feel we 
cannot do better than make excerpts therefrom : 

"He was connected with the Boston locomotive works and the Hinkley 
and Drury locomotive works, as treasurer, more than forty years. He was 
favored from youth to manhood with ample means for early training and 
education ; whoever shared in the noble and characteristic justice of this man 
was made better and more happy for life thereby. Hospitable to new truth, 
though not carried away by delusion, he examined every new theory in 
physics and morals; and if his faith waned he was as frank in its abandon- 
ment as he had been chivalrous in its defence. A parishoner and warm 
friend of Theodore Parker; exceedingly tenacious of opinion, and firm as 
steel in his protest against public wrong. Mr. Child was in his private re- 
lations the most gentle and genial of men. He 

" Never found fault with you, never implied 
Your wrong by (his) right; and yet men at (his) side 
Grew nobler, girls purer." 

His nature seemed proof against trial ; strong and sweet to the core. Some 
of the happiest hours of his life were passed in solitary visits to his farm in 
West Roxbury. He was on his way to this favorite haunt when, without 
a sigh, he passed away in the railway train, on the 18th October, 1876." 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3493. i. Mary Louisa Everett Child, b. in Boston, Mass., May 27, 1841, 
m. Oct. 5, 1863, Francis Bush. 

3494. ii. Franklin David Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Nov. 24, 1842, m. 
at the St. James Hotel, Boston, Mass., by Rev. Minot J. Savage, Nov. 6, 1879, 
Eliza C Howard, dau. of the late William H. Howard. 

3495. iii. George Frederick Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Aug. 9, 1844. 

3496. iv. Samuel Guild Child, b. in Boston, Mass., July 21, 1849. 

3497. v. Sophia Child, b. in Boston, Mass., June 3, 1853. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3409. x. Isaac Child, Jr., tenth child and fourth son of 
Isaac and Elizabeth Weld Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., May 



414 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

2, 1763, m. Sept. 30, 1792, Esther Bardwell. She d May 3, 
1835. He d. April 5, 1840. This family removed to Crafts- 
bury, Vt; at what date is not given. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3498. i. Esther Child, b. in Stnrbridge, Mass., July 22, 1793, d. same day. 

3499. ii. David Child, b. in Sturbridge. Mass., Aug. 23, 1794, m. Jan. 1, 
1822, Abigail Jones. 

3500. iii. Charles Lewis Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Jan. 24, 1796, 
d. young. 

3501. iv. Abijah Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Mch. 7, 1798, d. same 
day. 

3502. v. Charles Lewis Child, 2d, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Sept. 5, 1800, 
m. twice— 1st, April 10, 1823, Harriet Leach; m. 2d, Dec. 16, 1827, Malinda 
Leach. 

3503. vi. Azubah Bardwell Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Dec. 5, 1803, 
d. Nov. 4, 1821. 

3504. vii. Elizabeth Bardwell Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Jan. 18, 
1808, m. Mch. 16, 1828, Ansel Robbins. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3499. ii. David Child, second child and eldest son of Isaac 

and Esther Bardwell Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Aug. 23, 

1794, m. Jan. 1, 1822, Abigail Jones. She was b. July 3, 1801. 

Lived in Craftsbury, Vt., and removed to Union Centre, Ohio. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3505. i. Marian Winfield Child, b. June 12, 1826, d. June 5, 1829. 

3506. ii. Isaac Child, b. June 15, 1830, in. Mch. 24, 1864, Clarissa S« 
Downer. 

3507. iii. Simon Bardwell Child, b. April 2, 1834, m. April 14, 1859, 
Susan Michael. 

3508. iv. William Mason Lewis Child, b. July 10, 1838, d. May 2, 1839. 

3509. v. Mary Child, ) T . ) . g . M 1M „ 

3510. vi. Martha Child, \ iwins ' $ D - &ept ' i% 184 °- 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3507. iii. Simon Bardwell Child, third child and second 
son of David and Abigail .Jones Child, b. April 2, 1834, m. 
April 14, 1859, Susan Michael. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3511. i. Carrie Child, b. Jan. 30, 1860, d. Aug. 8, 1863. 

3512. ii. Hattie M. Child, b. Jan. 1, 1862, d. May 18, 1864. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3502. v. Charles Lewis Child, 2d, fifth child and fourth 
son of Isaac and Esther Bardwell Child, b. Sept. 5, 1800, m. 
twice — 1st, April 10, 1823, Harriet Leach; she d. Jan. 14, 
1825 ; m. 2d, Dec. 16, 1827, Malinda Leach, sister of the first 
wife; shed. Aug. 7, 1879. Mr. Child d. Mch. 8, 1880, in 
Decorah, Iowa. Mrs. Sallee, a daughter, writes of her father 
as a great but patient sufferer in the last months of his life ; 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 415 

but they were brightened and cheered by the prospect of a 
bappy future in his anticipated surroundings in the spirit world. 
He was an upright man, well informed on the general topics 
of the day ; a man of genial temperament and pleasant humor. 
He was one of the first settlers in Decorah, Iowa, having locat- 
ed there in 1853 ; was active in the affairs of town and county. 
| Seventh Generation.] Children. By first marriage: 

3513. i. Sylvanus Leach Child, b. Dec. 16, 1824, d. Men. 31, 1841. 

By second marriage : 

:;.->14. ii. John Killum Child, b. Sept. 3, 1828, d. Sept, 4, 1830. 

3515. iii. Sarah Jemima Child, b. Feb. 17, 1830, m. Jan. 11, 1849, James 
B. Hartgrave. 

3516. iv. Mary Ann Child, b. Men. 19, 1833, m. Dec. 25, 1851, John H. 
Davm. 

3517. v. Esther Child, b. May 25, 1835. m. May 25, 1856, Daniel C. 
Jerold. 

351S. vi. Darius Child, b. July 17, 1837, m. Dec. 25, 1861, Amanda 
Malvina Moore. 

3519. vii. George Child, b. April 7, 1840, d. Men. 4, 1849. 

3520. viii. Elizabeth Child, 1>. April 30, 1842, m. Oct. 11, 1865, William 
Sallee. 

3521. ix. Amasa Child, b. Aug. 24, 1844, in. Mary A. Jenkins. 

[Seventh Generation. ] 

3515. iii. Saeah Jemima Child, eldest dau. of Charles Lewis 
and Malinda Leach Child, b. in Sturbridge, Mass., Feb. 17, 
1831, m. Jan. 11, 1S49, James B. Hartgrave. Mrs. Hartgrave 
d. Nov. 1, 1875, in Floyd, Floyd Co., Iowa, to which place the 
family removed from Tazwell Co., 111. Mr. Hartgrave is 1 >y 

occupation a blacksmith. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3522. i. Harriet Leach Hartgrave, b. in Tazwell, Co., 111., Oct. 18, 
18-:9, m. Henry Lawrence Inman. 

3523. ii. Charles Lewis Hartgrave, b. in Allamakee Co., 111.. May 8, 
1853, m. Sept. 19, 1879, Geneva (iitt'ord. Resides in Wellington, Kansas. 

3524. iii. Susan Jane Hartgrave, b. in Decorah. Iowa, May 8, 1855, m. 
July 14, 1872, Lewis Miller. 

3525. iv. Pamelia Rebecca Hartgrave, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Nov. 2, 
1856, m. Dec. 25, 1873, Charles Sibley. 

3526. v. Lucia Malinda Hartgrave, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Sept. 4, 1858. 

3527. vi. Isabell Marion Hartgrave,^ in Decorah, Iowa, Mch. 22, 1862. 

3528. vii. Sarah Senora Hartgrave, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Feb. 22,1865. 

3529. viii. James Hartgrave, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Dec. 14, 1868, d. same 
day. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3522. i. Harriet Leach Hartgrave, eldest child of Sarah 
Jemima Child and James B. Hartgrave, b. in Tazwell Co., 111., 
Oct. 18, 1849, m. Mch. 27. 1S69, Henry Lawrence Inman of 
Winter, Burton Co., Iowa : reside in Wellington, Sumner Co., 
Kansas. 



416 BENJAMIN CHILD OF EOXBUBY. MASS. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3530. i. Austin James Inman, b. in Winter, Iowa, Jan. 20, 1870. 

3531. ii. Norabell Inman, b. in Winter, Iowa, Aug. 31, 1871. 

3532. iii. Henry Lawrence Inman, Jr., b. in Winter. la. Men. 6. 1873. 

3533. iv. Sarah Melvixa Inman, b. in Floyd, Iowa, Mch. 9, 1876. 

3534. v. Hattie Leoxice Inman, b. in Wellington, Sumner Co., Kansas. 
Dee. 11, 1879. 

[Eighth Generation. 

3524. iii. Susan Jane Habtgbave. third child and 
second dau. of Sarah Jemima Child and James B. Hartgrave, 
b. in Decorah, Winneshiek Co., Iowa, May S. 1853, m. July 
14. 1S72, Lewis Miller of Floyd, Floyd Co., Iowa : they reside 

in Floyd, Iowa. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3535. i. Pearla C. Miller, b. in Floyd. Iowa, May 14, 1873. 

3536. ii. James Miller, b. in Floyd, Iowa, Aug. 1875. 

3537. iii. Coral Belle Miller, b. in Floyd, Iowa, April 7, 1878. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3525. iv. Pamelia Rebecca Habtgbave, fourth child and 
third dau. of Sarah Jemima Child and James B. Hartgrave, b. 
in Decorah, Winneshiek Co., Iowa. Nov. 2, 1S56, m. Dec. 25. 
1873, Charles Sibley. 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3538. i. Freddie Sibley, b. Nov. 1874. 

3539. ii. Grace Sibley, b. May 1877. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3516. iv. Maby Ann Child, second dau. of Charles Lewis 
and Melinda Leach Child, b. Mch. 19, 1833, m. Dec. 25, 1851. 
John Hemy Davin of Tazwell Co., 111.; reside in Urbana, Burton 
Co., Iowa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3540. i. Emily Jaxe Davix, b. in Decorah, Iowa. April 28. 1853, in. John 
Gunn, Dee. 23. 1875; reside in Jewell, Jewell Co.. Kansas. 

3541. ii. Elizabeth Davix, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Oct. 4, 1855, m. March 
1876, Spencer Johnson. 

3542. iii. Elvira Malixda Davix. b. in Decorah, Iowa. Jan. 1, 1858. 

3543. iv. Axx Davix, b. in Decorah. Iowa, June 26. 1860. 

3544. v. Clara Davix, b. in Decorah, la,. Sept, 3, 1863, d. Sept. 10, 1865. 

3545. vi. Philip Davix, b. in Burton Co.. Iowa, Mav 23. 1866, d. Oct. 8. 
1866. 

3546. vii. Amasa Davix, b. in Burton Co.. Iowa. Feb. 17, 1868. 

3547. viii. Malvixa Davix. b. in Burton Co., Iowa, Feb. 23, 1871. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3541. ii. Elizabeth Davin, second child and dau. of Mary 
Ann Child and John Henry Davin, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Oct. 
4, 1855, m. March 1876, Spencer Johnson ; they reside near 
Winter, Iowa. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 417 

[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3548. i. Elsie Johnson, b. Jan. 17, 1877. 

3549. ii. Charles Leslie Johnson, l>. Dec ls?s. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3517. v. Esthek Lucinda Child, third dau. of Charles 
Lewis and Malinda Leach Child, b. May 25, 1835, m. May 25. 
1856, Daniel C. Jerold of Decorah, Iowa; reside in Lime Springs, 
Howard Co., [owa. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3550. i. Sarah Matilda Jerold, b. in Decorah, Iowa, Nov. 2, 1857. 

3551. ii. Emma Malinda Jerold, b. in Decorah, Iowa. Dee. 11. 1861, d. 
June 14,1862. 

3552. iii. Samuel Elmer Jerold, b. in Tioga Co., Pa., June 2, 1864. 

3553. iv. Daniel Amasa Jerold, b. in Tioga Co., Pa.. Oct. 2'2. 1867 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3518. vi. Darius Child, fifth child of Charles Lewis and 

Malinda Leach Child, b. July 17, 1837. m. Dec. 25, 1861, 

Amanda Malvina Moore. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3554. i. Etta Lucia Child, b. Dec. 14, 1862, in Decorah, Iowa. 

3555. ii. James Lewis Child, b April 3, 1865, in Decorah, Iowa. 

3556. iii. Laura Elizabeth Child, b. March 13, 1867, in Decorah, Iowa. 

3557. iv. George Leslie Child, b. Sept. 9, 1871, in Decorah, Iowa. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3520. viii. Elizbeth Child, fourth dan. of Charles Lewis 

and Malinda Leach Child, b. in Craftsbury, Vt., April 30, 1842. 

in. Oct. 11, 1865, William Sallee, of Decorah, Iowa. He d. 

Sept, 27, 1880. He was sergeant in Co. H, 9th Iowa Yet. Vol.: 

wounded at Pea Ridge. Mrs. Sallee resides in Decorah, Iowa. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3558. i. Charles Wilber Sallee, b. in Enimet, Iowa, Oct. 7, 1866. 

3559. ii. Darius Abram Sallee, b. in Benton Co., Iowa, April 13, 1868. 

3560. iii. Alma Malinda Sallee, b. in De Pne, Bureau Co., 111., Dec. 31. 
1874. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3521. ix. Amasa Child, fifth son of Charles Lewi- and 
Malinda Leach Child, b. in Craftsbury, Vt., Aug. 24. 1844, m. 
about 1873. Mary A. Jenkins. Residence Decorah. Iowa 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3561. i. Estella May Child, b. in Juniata, Adams Co., Nebraska. Jan. 
27, 1874. 

3562. ii. Charles Lewis Child, b. May 7, 1875, in Juniata, Neb. 

3563. iii. Alice Rosamond Child, b. June 11, 1877, in Juniata. Neb. 

3564. iv. Addie Cora Child, b. Nov. 15, 1878, in Juniata. Neb. 



418 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 



[Fifth Generation.] 

3411. xii. David Weld Child, twelfth child and seventh 
son of Isaac, Jr., and Elizabeth Weld Child, b. in Sturbridge, 
Mass., Feb. 19, 1792, m. April 1801, Abigail Dorr. dan. of 
Ebenezerand Abigail Cunningham Dorr, a merchant of Boston. 
[Sixth Generation ] Children: 

3565. i. David Child, b. in Boston, Mass., June 6, 1802, d. young. 

3566. ii. Edward Vernon Child, b. in Boston, Mass , March 13. 1804, 
m. in 1831, Malinda Katharine Lee. 

3567. iii. Abigail Dorr Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Aug. 10, 1806. d. 
Sept. 27, 1807. 

3568. iv. William Henry Child, b. in Boston, Mass., Dec. 22, 1809, d. 
Nov. 12, 1811. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3566. ii. Edward Vernon Childe, second child and son of 
David Weld and Abigail Cunningham Dorr Child, b. in Bos- 
ton, Mass., Mch. 13, 1804, m. 1831, Malinda Katharine Lee, 
dau. of General Henry Lee of Baltimore, Md. ; she d. 1861, in 
Paris, France. Reside in Paris, France. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children. 

3569. i. Edward Lee Childe, b. in Baltimore, Md., 1832, m. 1868, 
Blanche De Triquite of Paris, France. 

3570. ii. Arthur Childe, b. in Boston, Mass., 1834, d. in Munich, 
Bavaria. 

3571. iii. Florence Childe, b. in Florence, Italy, 1838, in. 1853, Count 
Henry Soltyk of Cracow, Poland. 

3572. iv. Mary Childe, b in Paris, France, 1841, m. 1859, Robert Hoff- 
man of Baltimore, Md., she d. 1865. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3571. iii. Florence Childe, third child and eldest dau. of 
Edward Vernon and Katharine Lee Childe, b. 1838, in Flor- 
ence, Italy, m. 1853, Count Henry Soltyk of Cracow, Poland. 
[Eighth Generation.] Child: 

3573. i. Stanislaus Soltyk, b. in 1854. He is a midshipman in the 
Austrian Navy. 

[Third Generation.] 

3377. iii. Elizabeth Child, third child and eldest dau. of 
Joshua and Elizabeth Morris Child, b. in Roxbury, Mass., July 
20, 1691, m. Dec. 18, 1711, John May, of Roxbury, Mass. He 
was b. 1686. 

Immediately after marriage Mr. May removed to Woodstock, 
where he spent a long and useful life. We are indebted to the 
diary of this Mr. May, covering the years of 1711-12-13, for 
establishing the identity of John Child of Woodstock, who 
m. Elizabeth , as the tenth child of Benjamin Child the 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 419 

emigrant. Mr. John May was of the fourth generation in descent 
from his emigrant ancestor. His father was John May, born 
in Roxbury, Mass., May 19, 1663, married Prudence Bridge* 
His grandfather was John May, who was born in England, 1631, 
who, with his brother, Samuel, emigrated with their father to 
America. His greatgrandfather, John May, was born in May- 
field, Sussex Co., England, 1590. He came to America in 
1640, and settled in that part of Roxbury, Mass., known as 
Jamaica Plains. He married twice, the name of first wife, or 
date of marriage, is not given. She died 1651. Her death is 
mentioned by the ''Apostle Elliot" where he says "Sister Maye 
died a very gracious and savory christian." 1 His second mar- 
riage was to Sarah . According to tradition, Mr. May, 

was master of the vessel called The James, which, as early as 
1635, sailed between the port of London and New England. 
He died April 28, 1670. Mrs. May died the same year.* 

[After giving the descendants of John May, who married 
Elizabeth Child, we shall give some account of his brother, 
Nehemiah. the eighth child of John and Prudence Bridge May.] 

[Fourth Generation ] Children. All the children were b. in Woodstock, Ct: 

** i. Elizabeth May, b. Oct. 18, 1712. 

** ii. John May, Jr., b. Sept. 9, 1714. He and one of his brothers were 
killed in bed by lightning. 

** iii. Joshua May, b. Oct. 16, 1716, in. Anna Bacon. 

** iv. Caleb May, b. Sept. 13, 1719, m. twice— 1st, Elizabeth Child: 
m. 2d, Mehitable Holbrook. 

** v. Stephen May, b. Nov. 10, 1721, in. Mary Child. 

** vi. Thomas May, b. Feb. 14, 1723, m. Lucy Goddard Child. 

** vii. Prudence May, b. Mch. 22, 1725, d. 1728. 

** viii. Esther May, b. Jan. 7, 1727, d. July 6, 1729. 

** ix. Prudence May, 2d, b. 1728. 

** x. Esther May, 2d, b. 1729, d. young. 

** xi. Prudence May, 3d, b. April 11, 1730. 

** xii. Joseph May, b. April 3, 1732. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

** iii. Joshua May, third child and second son of Eliza- 
beth Child and John May,b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 16, 1716, 
m. Jan. 20, 1741, Anna Bacon. 

*We are indebted to Henry A. May, Esq., of Boston, who is revising a 
Genealogy of the May Family, for this item of history. The record of 
Elizabeth Child May and her descendants reached us too late for the regular 
numbering. 



420 BENJAMIN CHILD OF KOXBURY, MASS. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 
*** i. Joseph May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 28, 1743, m. Lois Child. 
*** ii. Hannah May. 

*** iii. John May, b. in Woodstock, Dec. 29, 1749, in. Hannah Bugbee. 
*** iv. Hakmon May. 
*** v. Joshua May. 
*** vi. Walter May. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

*** iii. John May, third child and second son of Joshua 
and Anna Bacon May, b. in Woodstock, Dec. 29, 1749, m. 
Mch. 12, 1778, Hannah Bugbee; she was b. June 6, 1755, d. 
Nov. 15, 1857. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

**** i. Mary May, b. in Woodstock, Jan. 23, 1779, m. Luther Rawson. 

**** ii. Penuel May. b. in Woodstock, April 19, 1781, d. Sept. 20, 1759. 

**** iii. Erastus May, b. in Woodstock, Feb. 8, 1783, d. Feb. 8, 1787. 

**** j v> Charles May, b. in Woodstock, April 17, 1785, m. Mrs. Maria 
Chandler. 

**** v. John B. May, b. in Woodstock, Jan. 7, 1787, m. Sylvia Alba. 

**"* vi. Sophia May, b. in Woodstock, Nov. 30, 1789, d. Mch. 2, 1794. 

**** vii. Betsey May, b. in Woodstock, Dec. 11, 1791, d. 1806. 

**** viii. Sally May, b. in Woodstock, Oct. 15, 1793. m. Asa May. 

**** is. Erastus May, 2d, b. in Woodstock, Nov. 2, 1796, m. Lydia M. 
Child. (For children see page 195, No. 911.) 

**** x. Sophia May, 2d, b. Oct. 3, 1798. m. Dexter W. Jones. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

**** viii. Sally May, eighth child of John May and 

Hannah Bugbee, and granddaughter, of Elizabeth Child and 

John May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 15, 1793, m. Mch. 1819, 

Asa May. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

***** j_ Elizabeth May, b. July 10, 1821, m. Luther Rawson. 

***** ii. Charles Harris May, b. Feb. 2. 1823, m. Mch. 20. 1856, Harriet 
F. Child, dau. of Stephen and Abigail Carter Child. {For eh ildren see p. 171.) 

***** iii. Ezra C. May, b. Oct. 13, 1825, in. Elsie E. Chamberlain. 

***** lv> Carlo May, b. Sept. 3, 1S29. m. Mch. 23, 1853, Sarah M. Child, 
dau. of Dea. William and Sophia Selby Child. (For children see p. 252.) 

[Fourth Generation.] 

** iv. Caleb May, fourth child and third son of Eliza- 
beth Child and John May, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Sept. 13, 1791, 
m. twice — 1st, Oct. 15, 1751, Elizabeth Child, dau. of Ebenezer 
and Elizabeth Child, of Woodstock, Ct.; she was b. May 3, 
1723; m. 2d, Mehitable Holbrook. 
[Fifth Generation. J Children : 

*** i. Hannah May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1752. 

*** ii. Abtgail May, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Jan. 24. 1753. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 421 

[Fourth Generation. | 

** v. Stephen May, fifth child and fourth sou of Eliza- 
beth Child and John May, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Nov. 10, 1721, 
ra. June 11, 17-17, Mary Child, dan. of Ephraim and Priscilla 
Harris Child. She was b. April 1, 1721, d. Mch. 18, 1807. 
He d. May 3, 1791. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

*** i. Elizabeth May, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Nov. 10, 1748, in. Aaron 
Lyon. 

*** ii. Lucy May, I). Mch. (i, 1750. 

*** iii. Makv May, b. Aug. 25, 1752, in. Mch. 21, 1777, Alpha Child, 
son of Nathaniel and Jemima Bugbee Child, of Woodstock, Ct. (For 
children see page 252, No. 1578.) 

*** iv. Stephen May, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Mch. 23, 1755, m. 
Hannah Murray. 

*** v. Joanna May, b. Feb. 8, 1757. 

*** vi Ephraim May. b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 22, 1759, in. Abigail 
Chandler. 

*** vii. Sarah May. b. in Woodstock, Ct., Nov. 21, 1761, m. Col. 
( ihester Child ; she d. Feb., 1826. (For children see page 240.) 

*** viii. Asa May, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Sept. 4, 1764, m. Annie 

Fillibrown; he d. Nov. 17. 1825. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

** vi. Thomas May, sixth child and fifth son of Eliza- 
beth Child and John May, b. in Woodstock, Ct,, Feb. 14, 
1723, m. 1755, Lucy Goddard Child, dau. of William and 
Deborah Goddard Child, she d. Dec. 17, 1790. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

*** i. Silas May, b. in Woodstock, Ct., 1753, d. 1805. 

*** ii. William May, b. in Woodstock, 1760, d. Dec. 12, 1849. 

*** iii. Abel May, b. in Woodstock. 1762, d. Oct. 10, 1767. 

*** iv. Chloe May, b. in Woodstock, 1764, d. Sept. 17, 1767. 

*** v. Prudence May. j b. in Woodstock, 1766, .1. June 24, 1831. 

- Twins. 

*** vi. Jonathan May, ) b. in Woodstock, 1766, d. 1836. 

*** vii. Abigail May, b. in Woodstock, m. Cyril Carpenter. 

*** viii. Thomas May, b. in Woodstock, m. Mary Hunt Mills. 

We notice also Nehemiah May, a brother of the John May who married 
Elizabeth Child, as some of his descendants have married into the Child 
family. He emigrated with his brother John to Woodstock, Ct,, where he 
reared a family of seven children. His youngest son, Eliakim May, married 
Martha Lyon, daughter of Mehitable Child and Nehemiah Lyon. Eliakim 
and Martha Lyon May had six children (see page 198). His second child. 
Nehemiah May, married Nancy Morse, daughter of Dr. David Morse, of 
Woodstock, Ct. Nehemiah and Nancy Morse May had six children ; their 
second child, Trenck May, married Cynthia Child, daughter of Capt. Wil- 
lard Child. (For record of Trenck Mag, see page 199.) 



422 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Third Generation.] 

3379. v. Joseph Child, fifth child and third son of Joshua 
and Elizabeth Morris Child, b. in Koxbury, Mass., Jan. 7, 1696, 
m. Nov. 29, 1722, Abigail Bridges. Removed to Woodstock, 
Ct., where the births of his children are recorded. He d. 1765, 
aged 69. She d. Jan. 24, 1788. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

3574. i. Anna Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 17, 1725, m. Nathaniel 
Johnson, Jr. 

3575. ii. Abigail Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Jan. 15, 1727, m. Oct. 5, 
1752, Ebenezer Haven. 

3576. iii. Prudence Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., July 22, 1729, m. July 
15, 1752, Uriah Allard. 

3577. iv. Relief Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 12, 1830. 

3578. v. Rebecca Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 11, 1733, d. Oct. 

18, 1736. 

3579. vi. Francis Child, b. Dec. 28, 1735, d. April 10, 1738. 

3580. vii. Rebecca Child, 2d, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Mch. 13, 1838. 

3581. viii. Joseph Child, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., Mch. 4, 1739, in. 
Abigail . He d. Oct. 26, 1760, at Greenbush, N. Y. She m. again, Nov. 

19, 1767, Nathaniel Blake, of Woodstock, Ct. 

3582. ix. Abel Child, b. Feb. 24, 1746, d. Mch. 5, 1751. 
[Fourth Generation.] 

3574 i. Anna Child, eldest child of Joseph and Abigail 
Bridges Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, June 17, 1725, m. April 
1, 1756, Nathaniel Johnson, Jr.; she d. Aug. 29, 1804. Mr. 
Johnson was arnry nurse in the Revolutionary war, and died 
of small-pox at Fishkill, N. Y., where he was buried. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: All born in Woodstock, Ct. 

3583. i. Stephen Johnson. 

3584. ii. William Johnson, b. Oct. 13, 1760. 

3585. iii. Peter Johnson. 

3586. iv. Silas Johnson, b. June 29, 1763, in. March 31, Huldah Beck- 
with. 

3587. v. Levi Johnson, b. March 25, 1766, m. Bishop. 

3588. vi. Sarah Johnson, m. Morse. 

3589. vii. Asa Johnson, b. Oct, 16, 1767, m. at Bolton, Ct., April 24, 
1794, Clarissa Carver. 

3590. viii. Anna Johnson, b. Dec. 25, 1771, m. Nathaniel Brown. 

3591. ix. Mart Johnson, b. , m. Lyons. 

3592. x. Nathaniel Johnson, Jr., b. June 5, 1775, m. Lydia Chandler, 
d. Dec. 31, 1851. 

3593. xi. Dolly Johnson, b. Aug. 23, 1776. Of the seven sons of 
Nathaniel Johnson, Jr., four were patriot soldiers of the Revolution — Peter 
was first-lieutenant. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3589. vii. Asa Johnson, seventh child and sixth son of 
Anna Child and Nathaniel Johnson, Jr., b. Oct. 16, 1767, m. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 423 

April 24, 1794, Clarissa Carver, of Bolton, Ct. Clarissa Carver 
was a descendant of Gov. Carver, of the Plymouth colony, 
and a decided christian woman. 
[Sixlli Generation.] Children: 

3594. i. Clarissa Johnson, b. in Bolton, Ct., Jan. 25, 1796, in. Capt. 
Asa Lawrence. 

3595. ii. Mary Johnson, b. in Bolton, Ct. Sept. 24, 1798, unmarried. 

3596. iii. Pamelia Johnson, b. in Deerfield, Mass., June 23, 1800, d. 
Dec. 31, 1858, unmarried. 

3597. iv. Asa Johnson. Jr.. b. in Deerfield. Mass., Feb. 13,1802, ni. July 
4, 1830, Julia Warner Sadd. 

359S. v. Carver Johnson, b. in Deerfield, Mass., June 30, 1804. d. April 
9, -1868. 

3599. vi. Harvey Child Johnsox, b. in Deerfield. Mass.. Sept. 30, 1806, 
d. Mch. 15, 1858. 

3600. vii. Nathaniel Trumbull Johnson, b. in Deerfield. Mass., Nov. 
17, 1808. 

3601. viii. Ebenezer Johnson, b. in Deerfield, Mass., April 10, 1811. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3597. iv. Rev. Asa Johnson, fourth child and eldest son of 
Asa and Clarissa Carver Johnson, and grandson of Anna Child 
and Nathaniel Johnson, Jr., b. in Deerfield, Mass.. Feb. 13, 1802, 
m. Julv 4, 1830, Julia Warner Sadd. dau. of Dea. Chauncey 
and Cynthia Barbour Sadd of Windsor, Ct. Mrs Johnson died 
March 23, 1852, at Goshen, Ind. Rev. Mr. Johnson gradu- 
ated at Union College, Schenectady, X. Y., in 1827. and at 
Auburn Theological Seminary, in 1830. His pastorates as a 
Presbyterian clergyman have been in Cape Grerardeau, Mo.; 
Richmond and ISTunda, N. Y.: Peru. Ind.; Adel and Redfield* 
Iowa. He resides with his son, Rfv. E. P. Johnson, in Mar- 
shall. Mich.: four children. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3602. i. Cynthia Maria Johnson, b. May 3, 1831, m. June 14, 1860, 
Rev. Francis Z. Rossiter, son of Rev. Dudley Denison Rossiter and Eliza 
Woodbridge Rogers. Rev. Mr. Rossiter was b. in Boston, Mass., Jur.e 8, 
1831. He graduated at Marietta College, Ohio, in 1850, and at Lane Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1859. His pastorates as a Presbyterian clergyman have 
been in Huron, Ohio; Oshkosh and Omro, Wis : no children. 

3603. ii. Eleanor Emerson Johnson, b. Oct. 22. 1833, m. Sept. 25. 
1855, Rev. P. S. McCabe D. D., of Topeka, Kansas. Dr. McCabe was suc- 
cessor of his father-in-law. Rev. Asa Johnson, in Peru, Ind. 

3604. iii. Rev. Edward Payson Johnson, b. Jan. 26. 1850. in. March 
23, 187b, Cora Brown. Mr. Johnson has been settled at Sandy Hill, N. Y.. 
and is now the pastor of the Presbyterian church in Marshall, Mich. 

3605. iv. Mary Clarissa Johnson, b. June 5. 1855. 

[Third Generation.] 

3382. viii. Dorothy Child, eighth child and fifth dau. of 
Joshua and Elizabeth Morris Child, b. in Roxburv. Mass., May 
5, 1701, m. May 2, 1723, Ebenezer Draper. 



424 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Fourth Generation.] Children: 
3600. i* Dorothy Draper, b. Feb. 1, 1724. 

3607. ii. Ann Draper, b. May 23. 1725. 

[Third Generation.] 

3386. xii. Caleb Child, twelfth child and sixth son of 
Joshua and Elizabeth Morris Child, b. in Hoxbury, Mass., Sept. 
16, 1709, m. Oct. 19, 1736, Eebecca Dana. 
[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

3608. i. Anna Child, b. Dec. 16, 1739, d. Oct. 15, 1747. 

3609. ii. Mehitable Child, b. Mch. 23, 1740, d. Sept. 28, 1747. 

3610. iii. Abigail Child, b. Aug. 10, 1744, d. Nov. 10, 1745. 

3611. iv. Caleb Child, Jr., b. Sept. 17, 1746, d. Oct. 16, 1747. 

3612. v. Phineas Child, bapt. Sept. 3, 1749, m. abt. 1775, Elizabeth 
Briggs. 

3613. vi. Solomon Child, b. Sept. 13, 1752, m. 1803, widow William 
Wiswell. 

3614. vii. Caleb Child, Jr., 2d, b. May 7, 1759, m. 1799, Sarah Bram- 
hall. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3612. v. Phineas Child, fifth child and second son of Caleb 
and Rebecca Dana Child, bapt. Sept. 3, 1749, m. abt. 1775, 
Elizabeth Briggs, dau. of James Briggs, of West Eoxbur y, Mass. 
Mr. Child d. 1814. Mrs. Child d. Sept. 28, 1800. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

3615. i. Phineas Child, Jr., b. April 25, 1777, in. Sept. 20, 1801, Susanna 
Whitney. 

3616. ii. Thomas Child, b. Jan. 10, 1779, ra. 1803, Harriet Williams : 
lived in Cambridge, Mass. 

• 3617. iii. Solomon Child, b. Jan. 30, 1781, d. at Putnam, Ct., May, 7, 
1816 

3618. iv. Betsey Child, b. Bfec. 3, 1782, m. Nov. 8, 1812, Aaron Rhodes. 

3619. v. Rebeca Child, b Nov. 21, 1784, m. Dec. 14, 1807, William 
Tucker, of Boston, Mass.; she d. Sept. 10, 1842. 

3620. vi. Polly Child, b. Oct. 15, 1786, d. Dec. 14, 1867, unmarried. 

3621. vii. Abigail Child, b May 17, 1789, d. May 10, 1795. 

3622. viii Anna Child, b. July 13, 1792, m. Thomas Dillaway; shed, 
in Boston, July 1829. 

3623. ix. Sarah Child, b. Dec. 6, 1795, m. Andrew Hyde, of Prescott, 
Mass., d. Jan 4, 1847. 

[Fifth Generation ] 

3615. i. Phineas Child, Jr., eldest child of Phineas and 
Elizabeth Briggs Child, b. April 25, 1877, m. Sept. 20, 1801, 
Susanna Whitney, of Warwick, Mass. She was b. Jan. 31 r 
1773. Resided in Warwick. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children : 

3624. i. Phineas Child, Jr., b. March 18, 1804, d. Jan. 16, 1852. 

3625. ii. Daniel Child, b. Dec. 20, 1805, d. Jan. 2, 1828, unmarried 

3626. iii. Susanna Child, b. Sept. 27, 1807, unmarried. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

[It is with very sincers regret that I learn upon the issue of 
my last circulars, announcing the completion of my work, thai 
the record sent me of the descendants of Joshua Child, is 
quite incomplete, and also that numerous errors in dates and 

names are found in other families of this line, besides those 
herewith amended, vet too late to correct. 

When I was preparing the material sent me of the Caleb 
Child who married Sarah Bramhall, 1 felt that there should In- 
later report, ami wrote to Mr. Isaac Child for some address by 
which I might obtain it. hut could get none. In sending my 
last circulars I have found the grandchildren of this Be\\ 
Caleb Child, and I most gladly welcome from them, especially 
Mr. Ethan Allen Doty, the following most interesting account 
of this talented man and his worthy and honorable descendants. 

It may not be amiss to state in connection with this supple- 
ment that I have compared the record sent me of early history, 
with copies made personally, or by agents, of town records, in 
Woodstock, Ct, Upton, Deerrleld. Rutland and Boston, Ma^s., 
and of the Roxbury church records.] 

Rev. Caleb Child, M. D., whose record is very brief on 
page 425. was b. May 13, 1759, and m. July 21, 1799, Sarah 
Bramhall. In 1792 he went to Albany. N. Y., and opened a 
school there, with a recommendation signed by " Samuel West, 
minister of the Church of Christ, Hollis street, Boston." 
" William Heath, late Major General in the American arm v. 
Roxbury,'' " and twenty other persons of respectability " to 
the effect that. " Mr. Caleb Child, the bearer, has taught school 
to general satisfaction, and with great snecess, in the neighbor- 
hood of this place for five years past, during which time he 
has occasionally supplied the pulpit at the Third Parish in 
Roxbury. having at a proper time, and in a regular manner, 
entered on the work of the Gospel ministry.'" In June, 1795, 
Deacon Caleb Child was recommended for admittance to the 
Order of Priests, by a certificate signed by Bishop Seaburv 
and the Standing Committee of the Episcopal Church in Con- 
necticut, and addressed to the Bishop of New York. He was 
granted a certificate as physician by Gilbert Livingston. 
Master in Chancery at Poughkeepsie. June 1. 1798, and March 
3, 1803. was appointed b} r the Governor. " Surgeon of the 
Reg't of Militia in the county of Dutchess." From this time 
until his death he preached the Gospel, practicing at the same 
time as a physician, and for at least a portion of the time while 
residing in Troy, N. Y., kept an apothecary store. Rev. Dr. 
Child could not have filled all these varied callings, had he 
not been a very methodical man : a large volume of sermons 
in manuscript testifies to his power as a minister, as well as to 
his neatness as a penman. A medallion portrait of him on 
ivory, taken apparently about his fortieth year, remains in the 
family ; it represents him in clerical costume, with a pleasing 
and attractive face, and strong characteristics. His marriage 
to Miss Bramhall was not pleasing to her parents, and the ser- 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

vice was performed by William Lathrop, Esq., at the borne of 
her uncle Blisha Barlow. Esq.. the brother of her mother. 
The Bramhalls and Barlows were among the earliest settlers of 
Amenia. X. Y. the Bramhalls having come from Plymouth, 
.Mass., and the Barlows from Sandwich on Cape Cod. 
[Fifth Generation J Children: 

i. Edmund Bramhall Child, b. Dec. 23, 1800, m abt. 1823. Fanny X. 
Lockwood. 

ii. Caleb Child, b May 31, 1803, in Poughkeepsie. X. Y. He received 
a fair education and became a printer. In 1832, he left Xew York City for 
the South. He died at Xew Orleans. La., of yeilow fever, Oct. 9, 1833," just 
as he hal been called to the editorship of a newspaper in Mobile, Ala. He 
was a man of varied attainments, and died greatly regretted. 

iii. Mary Eliza Child, b. in Poughkeepsie. ' Oct. 25, 1805, d. at Trov. 
N. Y.. May 30, 1811. 

iv. RbBECCA Anna Child, b April 4, 1808, m. May2,1847, Isaac D. Wetsell. 

v Sarah Mehitable Child, b. Sept, 19, 1810. in. Oct, 15, 1830, Warren 
S. Doty. 

vi. Solomon Child, b. in Troy. X. Y.. July 19, 1813. Became a printer: 
left Xew York City in 1832, and settled finally in Montgomery, Ala., where 
he became editor and part owner of the Montgomery Advertiser ; at that 
time the second in value of newspapers in the State. He died there, un- 
married, 1838 or '39. 

vii. Joseph Bramhall Child, b June 8, 1815, m. 1858, Sarah B. Hamlin. 
[Fifth Generation.] 

Edmund Bramhall Child, the eldest son and child of Rev. 
Caleb and Sarah Bramhall Child, b. in Stamford, Ct, Dec. 23, 
1800, m. about 1S23. Fannie N. Lockwood, dan. of Millington 
Lockwood. of Albany, N. Y. The family of Dr. Caleb Child 
inherit the literary tastes and talents of the father, three of the 
sons becoming journalists Mr. E. B. Child was for several 
years connected with the Albany Argus. He published the 
E-scretor, a masonic paper, also the American Masonick Record 
in that city. He was the publisher of the Albany Direct. >ry 
for a number of years. He died in Albany in 1840. 

[Sixth Generation. 1 Children: 

i. Henry Clay Child, b. April 25, 1824, m. Jan. 30, 1848, Georgiana T. 
H. Bowman. 

ii. Edmund Bramhall Child, b. Sept. 2, 1826, m. Oct. 7. 1855, Rebecca 
Anna Harystman 

iii. Jane Lockwood Child, b. Aug. 5, 1830, m. Capt. John Baxter of Cape' 
Cod. Two children, son and daughter; names not sent. 

iv. Charles Augustus Child, b. Sept. 13, 1834, m. and has four children: 
names not given. Mr. Child is President of the American Union Express 
Co.. Xew York City. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

i. Henry Clay Child, eldest child of Edmund Bramhall 
and Fanny X. Lockwood Child, b. in Albany, N. Y.. April 25, 
1S24, m. Jan. 30, 1818, by Rev. William Adams, D. D., of Cen- 
tral Presbyterian Church, New York City, Georgiana T. H. 
Bowman. Residence, Sb 8th street, Hoboken, N. J. A printer. 

[Seventh Generation J Children: 

i. Fanny Millington Child, b. in Xew York Citv, Dec. 24, 1848, m. Jan. 
8. 1868. James II. Wilson. She d. May 6, 1869, without children. 

ii. Emma Bertha Child, b. in Xew York Citv, Aug. 6, 1851, m. Oct. 25, 
1876, David B. Idell. 

iii. Laura Amelta Child, b in Hoboken, X. J., Aug. 20, 1853, d. May 2, 

iv. Ella Gertrude Child, b. in Hoboken, X. J., April 7, 1857. [1857. 

v. Grace Charlotte Child, b. in Hoboken, X. J., Sept. 8, 1859. 

vi. Jennie Louise Child, b. in Hoboken, X. J , April 22, 1864. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

vii. George Henry Child, b. in Hoboken, N. J., Nov. 30, 1866. 
viii. Frank Malcomb Child, Ii in Hoboken, N. J.. Jan. 1870. 

] Sixth Generation.] 

ii. Edmund Bramhall Child, b. Saturday Sept. 2, 1826, 

in Albany, N. V., m. Oct. 7, 1855, on Sunday, a1 the homeof the 
bride, in Morrisania. Rebecca Anna Harystrnan, dau of Arthur 
Berryhill and Catherine Eliza Drummond Harystrnan, who 
were among the original settlers of Morrisania, now a part of 
the City of New York, an active participant in public affairs, 
was elected and re-elected to various offices, and was for many 
years Justice of the Peace. Air. E. B. Child attended the 
schools of Mr. Morse and Mr. Steele of Albany. Learned the 
printing business; became an editor and publisher in New 
York City. Actuary of Mechanics Institute in that city 
several years, and much valued in that position for his efficien- 
cy. Is a democrat in politics. Is a writer for the press. En- 
gaged in Fire Ins. business. Residence, New York City. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

i. Bdmumd Bramhall Child, Jk., b. Monday, July 11, 1864, in Morris- 
ania, N. Y. Attended Miss Coyles' school, and the " Suburban Seminary" 
of Rev. Edwin Johnson. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

iv. Rebecca Anna Child, second dau. of Rev. Caleb and 

Sarah Bramhall Child, b. in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., April 4, 

L80S, m. May 2, 1847, Isaac Dennison Wetsell of Albany, N.Y. 

He was b. in Catskill, N. Y., Nov. 21, 1811 ; son of James and 

Katherine Van Bergen Van Valtenberg Wetsell. Mrs. R. A. C. 

Wetsell d. Nov. 10, 1879. 

[Sixth Generation.] Child: 

i. Sarah Harriet Wetsell, b. Oct, 27, 1849. in. Oct. 20. 1874, John T. 
Bramhall. 

[Sixth Generation.] 

i. Sarah Harriet Wetsell, only child of Rebecca Anna 
Child and Isaac. D. Wetsell, b. in Albany, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1849, 
m. Oct. 20, 1874, John Tobias Bramhall, who was b. Oct. 6, 
1849, at Ghent. Columbia county, N. Y. ; son of Charles Hurl- 
burt and Eliza Hogeboom Bramhall. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

i. Laura Elbertje Bramhall, b. in Falls Church, Va., Oct. 14, 1875. 

ii. Lida Martin Bramhall, b. in Albany, X. Y., Oct. 25 1877. 

iii. Frederic Dennison Bramhall, b. in Albany, N, Y., April 16, 1880. 
[Fifth Generation.] 

v. Sarah Mehitable Child, third dau. of Rev. Caleb and 
Sarah Bramhall Child, b. Sept. 19, 1810, in Troy, N. Y., m. at 
Niscayuma, Albany county, N. Y., Oct. 15, 1830, Warren 
Samuel Doty, who was b. in Renssalaer county, N. Y., May 6, 
1810; a son of Ethan Allen and Keturah Tompkins Doty. He 
was a lineal descendant of Edward Dotey, one of the original 
pilgrims of the "Mayflower." Mrs. Doty was early thrown on 
her own resources by the death of her parents; was a woman 
of superior natural gifts, self-reliant, energetic, and thoroughly 
devoted to the care of her family circle. Mr. and Mrs. Doty 
removed, in 1S31, to NewYork City, and for several years both 
worked as map mounters in the map establishment of the Col tons. 



BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBl'RY. MASS. 

Mr. Doty later went into the business of engraving and print- 
ing, in which he continued until his death : he was a successful 
business man. and won the respect and esteem of all who 
knew him. He died at Brooklvn. N. Y.. Nov. 14, 1855. Mrs. 
Sarah M. C. Doty died at Brooklyn. N.Y., July 23. 1878, aged 
68. Funeral services were held Thursday the 25th. from her 
late residence 97 St. Felix street. She was buried in the family 
lot at Greenwood beside her husband. Affectionate, kind and 
devoted parents, their memory will ever be cherished by their 
children." 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

i. Mary Eliza Doty. b. in Xew York City. July 5. 1831, unra: merchant; 
lives in Brooklyn, N. Y, 

ii. George Washington Doty, b. in New York City. Oct. 5, 1834, d. in 
Brooklyn, Nov. 6. 1870. Clerk: unmarried. > 

iii. Ethan Allen Doty. b. in New York. June 14, 1837. in. Jan. 22, 1861. 
Ellie Eliza MeFarlan. who was b. in Brooklyn, Aug. 23. 1839: dau. of James 
and Margaret Cronk MeFarlan. Mr. Doty was educated at the public 
schools and college of New York City, where he is now a merchant and 
manufacturer, of the firm of Doty & MeFarlan. + 

iv. Catherine Long Doty, b. in Xew York, Nov. 5, 1839, m. Feb. 15, 
1861, Gilbert R, Lindsay. 

v. Rebecca Anna Doty. b. in Xew York, April 10, 1842, unm. Resides 
in Brooklyn, X. Y. 

vi. Sarah Mehitable Doty, b. in Xew York, June 7, 1845, d. in Brook- 
lyn, July 6, 1849. 

\ii. Warren Samuel Doty, b. in Brooklyn, Sept. 22. 1848, unm: clerk. 
Lives in Brooklyn. 
[Sixth Generation.] 

iv. Catherine Long Doty, second dau. of Sarah M. Child 
and Warren S. Doty, b in Xew York City, Nov. 5, 1831*. m. 
in Brooklyn. Feb. 15, 1S61. Gilbert Robertson Lindsay, who 
was b. in New York, Jan. 31, 1834. son of Gilbert Robertson 
and Susanna Brower Lindsay Reside in Rahwav. N. J., 
where he is a practicing lawyer and Superintendent of Public 

Schools. 

[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

i. Kate Lindsay, b. Oct. 5, 1865. in Brooklyn. 

ii: Robert Lindsay, b. Sept. 14. 1869, in Rah way. X. J. 

iii. Sarah Agnes Lindsay, b. Aug. 19, 1875. in Rahway. X. J. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

Joseph Bramhall Child, seventh and youngest child of 

Rev. Caleb and Sarah Bramhall Child, was a printer, received 

a fair education. In June, 1847, he left Xew York City as a 

sailor and was not heard from till his return to the city in 

1852. having in the mean time sailed mainly between the coasts 

of Africa and England. About 1855 he removed to Grand 

Detour, Ogle county. 111., where he married, in 1858, a widow 

whose maiden name was Sarah B. Hamlin (first husband's name 

unknown). Mr. Child died in the autumn of 1864, in Grand 

Detour. Communications have failed to reach his family since 

1866. 

[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

i. Mary Fliza Child, b Men. 13, 1859. 

ii Ida Frances Child, b. July 5, 1860. 

iii. Edmund Bramhall Child, b. 1862. 

iv. A daughter, b. Dec. 10, 1864. 

*The brief mention of Mrs. Doty's death is fr( m an "In mdnorinni" caid. 1 
+ Is collecting material for the Genealogy of the " Dotey or Doten family. '" J 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS. -i'25 

362?. iv. Elizabeth Child, b. Jan. 25, 1810, in. Ebenezer Bird of Fram- 
ingham. Mass. : she d. July 20, 1860. 

3628. v. Ann Maria Child b. Aug. 26, L812, m. May 01. 1841, Barvey 
Barber; they lived in Warwick. Mass. 

3629. vi. Sophia Whitney Child, b. June 23, 1815, d. July IS, 1816. 

3630. vii. William Thomas Child, b. Oet. 6, 1817, in. Sept. 10,1847, 
Mary K. Watts. 

ii ( feneration. | 
3680. vii. William Thomas Child, seventh and youngest 
child and third son of Phineas and Susanna Whitney Child, b. 
Oct 6, 1817. in. Sept. 10, 1847, Mary R Watts. Reside at 

Gates. Mo. 

[Seventh Generation.] Child: 

3631. i. Ann Maria Child. I>. in Gates, Mo., May 1, 1849, m Mch. 11, 
1868, Milton Barnes 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3613. vi. Solomon Child, sixth child of Caleb and Rebecca 

Dana Child, b. Sept. 13, 1752. m. 1803, the widow of William 
Wiswell, of Newton, Mass. 
[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

3632. i. Bui.ah Child. b. 1804. 

3633. ii. Mary Ann Child, b. 1805. 

3634. iii. Rebecca Child, b. 1806. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3614. vii. Caleb Child, 2d, seventh child and fourth sou of 
Caleb and Rebecca Dana Child, b. May 7. 1759, m. 1799, Sarah 
Bramhall, dan. of Edmund and Mehitable Bramhall of Armenia, 
Dutchess Co., 1ST. Y. She d. 1806, at Canaan, Columbia Co., 
N. Y. Mr. Child was a graduate of Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge. Mass. He lived and died in Albany, N. Y. 

[Fifth Generation.] Children: 

3635. i. Edmund Bramhall Child, I), in Albany. X. Y., Dec. 23, 1800, 
in. Isabella . 

3636 ii. Caleb Child, Jr., b. in Albany. N. Y., May 31, 1803, d. of 
yellow fever, at Mobile, Ala.; unmarried. 

3037. iii. Mary Eliza Child, b. in Poughkeepsie, X. Y, 1806. d. 1811. 

3638. iv. Rebecca Ann Child, b. in Poughkeepsie. X. Y, April 4. 1808, 
in. Dennison Weskell, of Albany, X. Y. 

3639 v Sarah Mehitable Child, b. in Troy, X. Y., Sept. 18, 1810, in. 
Wanen Doty: now lives in New York City, and has six children, namesand 
dates of birth not given. 

364(1. vi. Solomon Child, b. July 18, 1813: lives in Texas; unmarried. 

3641. vii. Joseph Bramhall Child, b. June 8, 1S15. d. in Illinois a few 
years since, after an adventurous life. 



F l 



CHAPTER VII 



JOHN CHILD. 



It seems necessary to introduce this line with a preface, as 
there has been some question as to its paternity, and it becomes 
us to state the premises and our reasons for the conclusion we 
have reached in the matter. Our first point will be the fact 
that Benjamin and Mary Child of Roxbury, Mass., emigrants 
to America, had a son John, their tenth child and fifth son. 
The second point is to identify said John and his descendants, 
as there are found two lines quite distinct in their homes and 
families who have been supposed to be his posterity. We 
will give then, here, the reasons for the conclusion attained. 

We find that by far the larger number of the descendants of 
Benjamin Child, emigrant, removed from Koxbury to the 
colony established in the town now called Woodstock in Con- 
necticut, though we have no evidence that any of his sons 
went there unless it should seem that his younger son John 
did go there. If we find John did go to Woodstock our per- 
plexity ends. We have upon the Woodstock records the 
births of a large family of children to John and Elizabeth 
Child. At the time of the sending of the second delegation 
from Roxbury to the colony then called New Roxbury, seven 
sons of Benjamin Child, the second son of the Emigrant of that 
name, were old enough to go, some were married, others mar- 
ried after removing: John, the younger son of the emigrant, 
was not much the senior of some of his nephews, and might 
have felt he could better establish a family in the newer coun- 
try. A very strong point in the presumptive proof (for we 
cannot call it positive) is that the families from those earlier 
times always held themselves to be closely allied ; a stronger 
proof comes to us from an old diary of one John May, who 
married in 1711 Elizabeth Child, the daughter of Joshua 
Child, (Joshua being the son of Benjamin Child, the emigrant.) 
In this diary, which we have carefully read, we find Mr. May 
calls the John Child of Woodstock, Ct,, " Uncle John," (as he 
would be the uncle of his wife Elizabeth Child May, if he 



AND BIS DESCENDANTS. 427 

were the son of the emigrant and so the brother of Joshua,) 
while Ephraim, Benjamin. &c, the grandchildren of the emi- 
grant, he always calls "cousin." Others beside ourselves have 
examined the Woodstock records on this point, and entertain 
no doubt that the John whom we place at the head of this 
chapter, and whose long line of posterity we record, is the son 
of Benjamin Child, the emigrant. We therefore register him 
as we have done the others. 
[Second Generation.] 

lis. x. John Child, fifth son and tenth child of Benjamin 
and Mary Child, b. in Roxbury, Aug. 1. 1671, in. about" 1696 

or 1697 Elizabeth . Removed to New Roxburv, after- 

wards Woodstock, Ct: his children settled in that part of the 
town called West Woodstock, and here at a good old age he 
was "gathered to his father's" in 1764. 

[Third Generation.] Children: 

3642. i. Joiix Chili.. Jr., b. in Roxbury abt. 1698, m. Dec. 7, 1721, 
Abigail Ainsworth. 

3643. ii. Nathaniel Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 3, 1699. in. Dee. 
8, 1726. Dorothy Johnson. 

8644. iii. Samuel Child, b. Sept. 25, 1700, d. same week. 

3645. iv. Samuel Child, 2d. b. Jan. 27, 1702. in. May 27, 1727. Keziah 
Hutchins. 

3646. v. Jacob Child, b. April 25, 1703, in. April 18, 1728, Dorcas Ains- 
worth. 

3647. vi. JosiAH Child, b. Oct. 11, 1705, d. same month. 

3648. vii. Elizabeth Child, b. Sept. 10, 1708. 

3649. viii Hannah Child, b. Nov. 12, 1709, m. July 30, 1738, John 
Chamberlain. 

3650. ix. Abigail Child, b. May 17, 1711, d. June 19, 1790. 

3651. x. Martha Child, i g i , T 1A ^ 10 d. June 20, 1712. 

3652. xi. Mary Child. "/ g \ b - ,lum 1U ' ia ~ d. June 10, 1712. 



E— 



[Third Generation.] 

3642. i. Johx Child. Jr.. eldest child of John and Eliza 
beth Child, b. probably in Eoxbnrv. Mass.. abt. 1697 or 1698, 
m. Dec. 7, 1721, Abigail Ainsworth. 
[Fourth Generation.] Children: 

3653. i. Dorothy Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Oct. 6, 1722. 

3654. ii. Sarah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct,. May 12, 1724. 

3655. iii. Abi.iah Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., Sept. 17, 1726. m. twice— 
1st, Oct. 29, 1748. Priscilla Morse; m. 2d. Abigail Johnson. 

3656. i\-. Abigail Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct., -Tan. 1. 1728. in. Oct. 10, 
1740, Nathan Ains\Yorth. 

3657. v. John Child. Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., Aug. 8, 1733. m. Jan. 22, 
1756, Sybil Bugbee. 

3658. vi. Shuhael Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct , Aug. 13. 1735. m. Dec. 
27. 1759, Abigail Bowen. 



428 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBCRY, MASS. 

3659. vii. Benaiah Child, b in Woodstock, Ct., April 17, 1740. 

3660. viii. Hannah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Oct. 3, 1742. 

[Fourth Generation.] 

3055. iii. Abijah Child, third child of John and Abigail 
Ainsworth Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 17, 1726, m. 1st, 
Priscilla Morse, Oct. 29, 1748; m. 2d, abt. 1750, Abigail 
Johnson. 
[Fifth Generation J Children: By first marriage. 

3661. i. Abijah Child, Jr., b. in Woodstock, Ct., Sept. 3, 1749, in. Feb. 
17, 1774, Sarah Mascraft. 

By second marriage. 

3662. ii Eunice Child, b in Woodstock, Ct., May 3, 1750, m. May 17, 
1770, Samuel Buggies. 

3603. iii. Sarah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., Feb. 18, 1752, in. Jan. 19, 
1775, Elijah Mason. 

3664. iv. Hannah Carpenter Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct.. April 26, 
1751. 

3665. v. Benaiah Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., April 19, 1756. 

3666. vi. Fanny Child, b. in Woodstock. Ct.. April 6, 1759. 

36(57. vii. Asa Child, b. in Woodstock, Ct., June 18, 1701. in. April 20, 
1791, Abigail Adams. 

[Fifth Generation.] 

3601. i. Abijah Child, Jr, eldest child of Abijah Child 
and Priscilla Morse, b. in Woodstock, Ct, Sept. 3, 1749, m. 
Feb. 17, 1774, Sarah Mascraft, in Pomfiet, Ct, and removed 

to Pomfret, Vt, which town began to be settled in 1770. 
[Sixth Generation.] Children: 

3668. i. Jacob Child, b. Feb. 11, 1775, m. March 3, 1800, Abigail Drew. 

3669. ii. Sarah Child, b. Sept. 13, 1770. m. Dec. 1, 1796, John Land). 

3670. iii Abijah Child, Jr., b. May 18, 1778, unmarried. 

3671. iv. Sanfokd Child, \ ~ I b. Men. I m. Dec. 4. 1806, PollvConani. 

3672. v. Clarinda CniLD, "( '% \ 3, 1780, } m. Men. 5, 1810, John Wood. 

3673. vi. Gardner B. ChildT^ Feb. 22, 1782. m. Mch. 27, 1816, Isabella 
Martin. 

3674. vii. John Child, b. Dec. 14. 1783, m. 1812, Lorain Meigs. 

3675. viii. Irena Child, b. May 27, 1794, in. Aug. 22. 1822, Truman 
I >ixon 

[Sixth Generation.] 

3668. , i. Jacob Child, eldest son and child of Abijah and 
Sarah Mascraft Child, b. in Pomfret, Vt, Feb. 11, 1775, in. 
Mch. 3, 1800, Abigail Drew ; removed soon after his marriage 
to Franklin Co., N. Y. 
[Seventh Generation.] Children: 

3670. i. Angelina Child, b. Nov. 6, 1800, m. April 8, 1817, John Cargin. 

3677. ii. John Child, b. March 29, 1802, m. Sybil Clark. 

3678. iii. Jacob Child, Jr., b. Feb. 13, 1804, m. Samantha Sumner. 

3679. iv. Mary F. Child, b. Oct. 8, 1808. 

3680. v. George Child, b. June 2. 1812. m. 1st. July 1836, Mary C Nut- 
ter; in. 2d, Calista Cofferin. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS 429 

3681. vi. (huncey Child, 1>. .lune 5, 1814, m. May 11. 1887, Caroline 
Taylor. 

3682. vii. William S. Child, b. Deo. 21. 1815, in. March 10, 1841, 
Sophronia Coonley. 

3683. viii. Caroline A. Child, b. Dec. 16, 1821, in. Feb. 2, 1841, Tru- 
man Hale of Chateaugay, X. Y. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3677. ii. John Child, second child and eldest son of Jacob 
and Abigail Drew Child, b. in Pomfret, Vt., Mch. 29, 1802, 
m. May 20, 1S24, Sybil Clark. Mr. Child d. Dee. 21. 1836. 
Mrs. Child m. 2d, July 23, 1844, Joseph Pike, and d. Feb. 27, 
1879. Eesidence Castle Rock. Minnesota. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
36>'4. i. Clark Child, 1. Jan. 10. 1826, in. Dee. 24, 1848, Mary Goke. 

3685. ii. Temple Child, b. April 23, 1828. m. Sept. 27, 1852, Cornelia M. 
Eastings 

3686. iii. Henry D. Child, b. Oct. 17. 1830. m. July 3, 1856. Eliza R. 
Howell. 

3687. iv. Melixda Child. 1>. April 16, 1833. in. May 7. 1851, George P. 
Smith. 

3688. v. Ltjcinda Child, b. April is, 1835, <1. June 1. 1853. 
[Eighth Generation. J 

3686. iii. Henry D. Child, third son and child of John and 
Sybil Clark Child, b. Oct. 17, 1830, m. July 3. 1856. Eliza R. 
Howell. Residence East Castle Rock. Dakota Co.. Minn. 
| Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3689. i. John H. Child, b. July 12, 1857. 
**** ii. Herbert E. Child, b. Jan. 1, 1860. 
**** iii. Temple A. Child, b. Nov. 9, 1872. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3678. iii. Jacob Child. Jr., second son and third child of 
Jacob and Abigail Drew Child, b. in Pomfret, Vt. Feb. 13, 
1804, m. about 1831, Samantha Sumner, of Malone, N.Y. Mr. 
Child d. Sept. 13. 1873. Mrs. S. S. Child d. in Constable. 
Franklin Co., N. Y., May 28. 1846. 

[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3690. i. Delia Child, b. April 5. 1832. m. Nov. 18, 1857, Nahnm B. Bob- 
bins, of Constable. 

3691. ii. Daniel Child, b. June 18, 1833. 

3692. iii. George W. Child, b. April 3, 1835, m. Sept. 19. 1861, Arabel 
Wentworth. 

3693. iv. Clarissa Child, b. Sept. 6, 1836. in. George W. Shears. 

3694. v. John F. Child, b. Dec. 27, 1837. 

3695. vi. Betsey Child, b. Oct. 14, 1839, in. John Watson. 

3696. vil. Putnam F. Child, b. Dec. 27, 1841. 

3697. viii. William A. Child, b. Oct. 14, 1844. 



430 BENJAMIN CHILD OF ROXBURY, MASS. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3692. iii. George W. Child, second son and third child of 
Jacob, Jr., and Samantha Sumner Child, b. April 3, 1835, m. 
Sept. 19, 1861, Arabel Wentworth. Reside in Constable, NY. 
[Ninth Generation.] Children: 

3698. i. Alice B. Child, b. Aug. 22, 1862, in Constable, N. Y. 

3699. ii. Carrie E. Child, b. Oct. 3, 1864, in Constable, N. Y. 

3700. iii. Warren H. A. Child, b. July 8, 1868, in Constable, N. Y. 

3701. iv. George W. Child, Jr., b. June 6, 1870, in Constable, N. Y., d. 
Oct. 6, 1873. 

[Seventh Generation.] 

3680. v. G-eorge Child, third son and fifth child of Jacob 
and Abigail Drew Child, b. in Windsor Co., Vt, June 2, 1812, 
m. twice— 1st, July 1836, Mary C. Nutter; m. 2d, Calista 
Cofferin. Mr. Child resided in Malone, Franklin Co., N. YT 
In 1853 he removed to Illinois, and resided near Belvidere, in 
Boon Co., from thence he removed to Colorado, thence to Cal- 
ifornia, in 1858. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3702. i. George Albion Child, b. 1840 d. . 

3703. ii. Mary Elzadie Child, b. 1842, d. . 

3704. iii. Robert A. Child, b. Mch. 22, 1845, in. Dec. 24, 1873, Mary E- 
Cofferin. 

3705. iv. Henry Franklin Child, 1). 1846. Resides in Decatur, 111. 

3706. v. John Samuel Child, b. , d. at Higgins Place, Arkansas* 

Oct. 1870. 

3707. vi. Orange Scott Child. 

3708. vii. Corydon Child, ) g| ) Resides at Dubuque, Iowa. 

3709. viii. Cornelia Child, J > j d. aged 4 years. 

3710. ix. Abbie Child. 

[Eighth Generation.] 

3704. iii. Eobert A. Child, second son and third child of 
George and Mary C. Nutter Childs, b. in Antwerp, Jefferson 
Co., N. Y., Mch. 22, 1845, m. Dec. 24, 1873, in Normal, Mc- 
Lean Co., Illinois, by Rev. Mr. Leonard, Mary E. Cofferin, dau. 
of William W. G. and Helen E. Lester Cofferin. Mr. William 
W. G. Cofferin died Sept. 1866. Mrs. H. E. L. Cofferin resides 
with her daughter, Mrs. Robert A. Child, in Hinsdale, 111. Mr. 
Robert A. Child enlisted March, 1861, in the Federal army, 
and served until August, 1865, in the armies of the Mississippi 
and the Cumberland, respectively, under Generals Fremont, 
Hunter, Grant, Sherman, and Thomas. 
[Ninth Generation ] Children : 

3711. i. Lester Cofferin Child, b. Oct. 11, 1874, in Hinsdale, 111. 

3712. ii. William Robert Child, b. Sept. 27, 1876, in Hinsdale, 111. 



AND HIS DESCENDANTS.. 431 

[Seventh Generation. | 

3681. vi. CHAUNCEY CHILD, fourth son and sixth child of 
Jacob and Abigail Drew Child, b. June 5, 1814, m. May 11, 
1837, Caroline Taylor. Residence Malone, Franklin Co., N.Y. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 
3713 i. Bdson R. CmLD, b. May 28, 1838. 

3714. ii. Cornelia ('. Child, b. Oct. 29, 1839. 

3715. iii. M.u.vixa .1. Child, b. Jan. 28, 1840. 

3710. iv. Marion Child, b. Aug. 22. 1843, d. Feb. 1, 1859. 
:'»T17. v. Augusta J. Child, b, -Inly 22, 1845. 

[ Seventh Generation. | 

36S2. vii. Dr. William S. Child, fifth son and seventh 
child of Jacob and Abigail Drew Child, b. Dec. 21. 1815, m. 
Mch. 16, 1841, Sophronia Coonley, of Constable, N. Y. Mr. 
Child studied for the medical profession with Dr. George 
Darling of Constable, N. Y. Settled in Chateaugay, Franklin 
Co., N. Y.; commenced practice as a surgeon and physician, 
and gained the reputation of being skillful in his profession; 
a worthy and esteemed citizen. He died Aug. 21, 1846. 
[Eighth Generation.] Children: 

3718. i. Sarah A. Child, b. Oct. 3, 1843, in. 1871, William Lockley, of 
Boston. 

3719. ii. Williamine S. Child, b. Jan. 13